Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Bethesda, MD, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 70.00K | Year: 2011

Enig Associates, Inc., a woman-owned, small business providing advanced modeling and simulation capabilities to the DoD and DoE, is proposing an innovative and novel electrical approach, using explosive-driven flux compression generators (FCG) to convert explosive chemical energy to electromagnetic energy with very high current output and superb energy conversion efficiency and then enhance explosive load to augment reaction zone pressure and detonation speed with electromagnetic energy. Electrical conditioning can also be applied to munition casing to control fragmentation and blast pattern and directionality. The proposed program will use Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control (LMMFC) as our Phase I/II subcontractor and is complementary to our DARPA MAHEM Phase 3 program. Both theoretical and computational tools will be utilized in designing an integrated munition with augmented explosion, selectable fragmentation, and controlled blast to provide scalable and adaptive lethal effects against targets.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.95K | Year: 2015

ENIG, in collaboration with SRI, proposes to develop a modeling methodology with predictive and inferential capabilities to address the challenges of designing body armor to resist realistic multiple impacts from burst fire events. Our toolkit will provide an end-to-end modeling capability, grounded in the statistics of realistic impacts from small-arms fire, which would address the final materials state of a body armor system. ENIG will predict armor performance after an initial impact, predict the location of possible subsequent impacts, and update the materials model with these subsequent impacts. Initially, as a proof-of-concept, ENIG will focus the statistics of realistic burst fire impacts, examine the effect of multiple impacts from a Type IV, armor-piercing rifle threat on a ESAPI consisting of a boron carbide ceramic with a ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene backing. Multiple sets of impact validation studies will be performed to evaluate the ballistic resistance of this system. Methodologies developed here will be used evaluate a variety of small-arms systems, under a range of conditions. The end goal is to provide rigorous probabilistic risk assessments for body armor performance, which would enable better decision-making concerning armor design, materials selection, and requirements generation.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 2.22M | Year: 2009

Continuation of a program to investigate flux compression generator (FCG) internal voltage intolerance is proposed. The goal will be to develop feasible concepts for greatly increasing FCG internal voltage tolerance and implement the new concept in device simulations. Phenomena to be considered include “seeding” of gas breakdown by armature / stator contact point physics studied in Phase I. This program will coordinate flux compression generator simulations with gas breakdown theory and simulations. Flux compression generator numerical modeling tools will provide time-domain evolution of electric fields, magnetic fields, and current densities. Gas breakdown modeling will show if stray conducting paths through the gas are present for specified gas pressure. Several hypotheses are discussed in this proposal to explain why FCG voltage tolerance is poor. Improvements to gas chamber preparation, and coil design, expected to increase FCG voltage tolerance are proposed. The theory of breakdown of magnetized electronegative gases is described. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic gas breakdown simulation results and preliminary runs with a kinetic code are also presented. Plans for expansion and commercialization of the work are included, in part, through several Phase II technology options.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.91K | Year: 2016

Circuit card assembly (CCA) reliability is dependent on solder joints, which join components to printed circuit boards (PCBs). Board users strive to mitigate risks associated with gold-embrittled solder joints. Enig Associates, Inc. (ENIG), in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories, proposes to develop a risk-forecasting tool for quantifying the risks associated with gold-embrittled solder joints in electronic assemblies. The team will utilize existing Finite Element (FE) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) tools and modeling approaches to predict the evolution of gold-embrittlement on PCB-level, surface mounted devices. FE models, developed in Comsol Multiphysics and/or ANSYS, will assess stress concentrations in the solder joint adhesion layer, as a function of time and as a result of fabrication and environmental stresses. KMC models will examine the dynamics of intermetallic diffusion in the solid and adhesion layer. Results will be used to estimate bonding area strength in the FE model and to evaluate solder joint performance under transient loads. Approved for Public Release 16-MDA-8620 (1 April 16)


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 4.14M | Year: 2012

Enig Associates, Inc., a small business providing advanced modeling and simulation capabilities to the DoD and DoE, is proposing an innovative and novel electrical approach, using explosive-driven flux compression generators (FCG) to convert explosive chemical energy to electromagnetic energy with very high current output and superb energy conversion efficiency and then enhance explosive load to ultimately enhance the detonation speed with electromagnetic energy. Electrical conditioning can also be applied to munition casing to control fragmentation and blast pattern and directionality. Both theoretical and computational tools will be utilized in designing an integrated munition with augmented explosion, selectable fragmentation, and controlled blast to provide scalable and adaptive lethal effects against targets. The proposed Phase II program will use Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control (LMMFC) and SAIC (Albuquerque) as our Phase II subcontractors.

Discover hidden collaborations