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News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Sandia National Laboratories Director Stephen Younger discusses the future of the federal government's largest weapons and research facility now that it's under new management during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M., Monday, May 1, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Scientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory are pushing ahead with work related to national security and the proliferation of nuclear weapons as new managers take over New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories for the first time in decades, officials said Monday. Director Stephen Younger discussed the lab's future during a news conference that marked the start of a new contract with National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, a subsidiary of Honeywell International. The U.S. Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration announced the $2.6 billion management contract in December. Officials have spent the last few months working on a smooth transition for the lab's thousands of employees and operations. The bulk of work at Sandia centers on the research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons, but scientists there also have worked on energy and climate projects. Younger, who has a background in nuclear weapons, called Sandia's employees the "superheroes of technology." "Sandia defends the world and provides the opportunity for millions, if not billions, of people to lead peaceful and productive lives," he said. Younger said his team has centuries of combined experience when it comes to national security issues and while the core mission of Sandia will not change, Honeywell, Northrup Grumman and other partners will be looking for ways to do more work and do it faster. The new lab leadership acknowledged current global conflicts, including nuclear threats by North Korea. "The government understands the importance of these institutions, and the institutions understand they have to be accountable for the money and the information they're providing. It's a different world today," Younger said. Lockheed Martin had operated Sandia, located in Albuquerque, for the past two decades and was among bidders that lost out to the Honeywell team. With an annual budget of close to $3 billion, Sandia is one of the Albuquerque area's largest employers with more than 10,500 workers. Most are based in Albuquerque, but Sandia also operates sites at Lawrence Livermore lab in California and testing facilities in Nevada and Hawaii. Its Albuquerque campus spans more than 21 square miles. A recent report by a coalition of local governments found that Sandia's partnership with private organizations through a science and technology park has generated more than $315 million in economic impact across the state over two years. Sandia will continue to work with local and small businesses, Deputy Director Dave Douglass said Monday.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

US nuclear weapons lab to keep focus on national security (AP) — Scientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory are pushing ahead with work related to national security and the proliferation of nuclear weapons as new managers take over New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories for the first time in decades, officials said Monday. Director Stephen Younger discussed the lab's future during a news conference that marked the start of a new contract with National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, a subsidiary of Honeywell International. The U.S. Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration announced the $2.6 billion management contract in December. Officials have spent the last few months working on a smooth transition for the lab's thousands of employees and operations. The bulk of work at Sandia centers on the research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons, but scientists there also have worked on energy and climate projects. Younger, who has a background in nuclear weapons, called Sandia's employees the "superheroes of technology." "Sandia defends the world and provides the opportunity for millions, if not billions, of people to lead peaceful and productive lives," he said. Younger said his team has centuries of combined experience when it comes to national security issues and while the core mission of Sandia will not change, Honeywell, Northrup Grumman and other partners will be looking for ways to do more work and do it faster. The new lab leadership acknowledged current global conflicts, including nuclear threats by North Korea. "The government understands the importance of these institutions, and the institutions understand they have to be accountable for the money and the information they're providing. It's a different world today," Younger said. Lockheed Martin had operated Sandia, located in Albuquerque, for the past two decades and was among bidders that lost out to the Honeywell team. With an annual budget of close to $3 billion, Sandia is one of the Albuquerque area's largest employers with more than 10,500 workers. Most are based in Albuquerque, but Sandia also operates sites at Lawrence Livermore lab in California and testing facilities in Nevada and Hawaii. Its Albuquerque campus spans more than 21 square miles. A recent report by a coalition of local governments found that Sandia's partnership with private organizations through a science and technology park has generated more than $315 million in economic impact across the state over two years. Sandia will continue to work with local and small businesses, Deputy Director Dave Douglass said Monday.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Scientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory are pushing ahead with work related to national security and the proliferation of nuclear weapons as new managers take over New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories for the first time in decades, officials said Monday. Director Stephen Younger discussed the lab's future during a news conference that marked the start of a new contract with National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, a subsidiary of Honeywell International. The U.S. Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration announced the $2.6 billion management contract in December. Officials have spent the last few months working on a smooth transition for the lab's thousands of employees and operations. The bulk of work at Sandia centers on the research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons, but scientists there also have worked on energy and climate projects. Younger, who has a background in nuclear weapons, called Sandia's employees the "superheroes of technology." "Sandia defends the world and provides the opportunity for millions, if not billions, of people to lead peaceful and productive lives," he said. Younger said his team has centuries of combined experience when it comes to national security issues and while the core mission of Sandia will not change, Honeywell, Northrup Grumman and other partners will be looking for ways to do more work and do it faster. The new lab leadership acknowledged current global conflicts, including nuclear threats by North Korea. "The government understands the importance of these institutions, and the institutions understand they have to be accountable for the money and the information they're providing. It's a different world today," Younger said. Lockheed Martin had operated Sandia, located in Albuquerque, for the past two decades and was among bidders that lost out to the Honeywell team. With an annual budget of close to $3 billion, Sandia is one of the Albuquerque area's largest employers with more than 10,500 workers. Most are based in Albuquerque, but Sandia also operates sites at Lawrence Livermore lab in California and testing facilities in Nevada and Hawaii. Its Albuquerque campus spans more than 21 square miles. A recent report by a coalition of local governments found that Sandia's partnership with private organizations through a science and technology park has generated more than $315 million in economic impact across the state over two years. Sandia will continue to work with local and small businesses, Deputy Director Dave Douglass said Monday.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Scientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory are pushing ahead with work related to national security and the proliferation of nuclear weapons as new managers take over New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories for the first time in decades, officials said Monday. Director Stephen Younger discussed the lab's future during a news conference that marked the start of a new contract with National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, a subsidiary of Honeywell International. The U.S. Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration announced the $2.6 billion management contract in December. Officials have spent the last few months working on a smooth transition for the lab's thousands of employees and operations. The bulk of work at Sandia centers on the research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons, but scientists there also have worked on energy and climate projects. Younger, who has a background in nuclear weapons, called Sandia's employees the "superheroes of technology." "Sandia defends the world and provides the opportunity for millions, if not billions, of people to lead peaceful and productive lives," he said. Younger said his team has centuries of combined experience when it comes to national security issues and while the core mission of Sandia will not change, Honeywell, Northrup Grumman and other partners will be looking for ways to do more work and do it faster. The new lab leadership acknowledged current global conflicts, including nuclear threats by North Korea. "The government understands the importance of these institutions, and the institutions understand they have to be accountable for the money and the information they're providing. It's a different world today," Younger said. Lockheed Martin had operated Sandia, located in Albuquerque, for the past two decades and was among bidders that lost out to the Honeywell team. With an annual budget of close to $3 billion, Sandia is one of the Albuquerque area's largest employers with more than 10,500 workers. Most are based in Albuquerque, but Sandia also operates sites at Lawrence Livermore lab in California and testing facilities in Nevada and Hawaii. Its Albuquerque campus spans more than 21 square miles. A recent report by a coalition of local governments found that Sandia's partnership with private organizations through a science and technology park has generated more than $315 million in economic impact across the state over two years. Sandia will continue to work with local and small businesses, Deputy Director Dave Douglass said Monday.


LIVERMORE, Calif. - Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level. Mathematical and algorithmic developments along these lines are necessary for enabling the detailed study of complex hydrocarbon molecules that are relevant in engine combustion. Existing methods to approximate potential energy functions at the quantum scale need too much computer power and are thus limited to small molecules. Sandia researchers say their technique will speed up quantum mechanical computations and improve predictions made by theoretical chemistry models. Given the computational speedup, these methods can potentially be applied to bigger molecules. Sandia postdoctoral researcher Prashant Rai worked with researchers Khachik Sargsyan and Habib Najm at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility and collaborated with quantum chemists So Hirata and Matthew Hermes at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Computing energy at fewer geometric arrangements than normally required, the team developed computationally efficient methods to approximate potential energy surfaces. A precise understanding of potential energy surfaces, key elements in virtually all calculations of quantum dynamics, is required to accurately estimate the energy and frequency of vibrational modes of molecules. "If we can find the energy of the molecule for all possible configurations, we can determine important information, such as stable states of molecular transition structure or intermediate states of molecules in chemical reactions," Rai said. Initial results of this research were published in Molecular Physics in an article titled "Low-rank canonical-tensor decomposition of potential energy surfaces: application to grid-based diagrammatic vibrational Green's function theory." "Approximating potential energy surfaces of bigger molecules is an extremely challenging task due to the exponential increase in information required to describe them with each additional atom in the system," Rai said. "In mathematics, it is termed the Curse of Dimensionality." The key to beating the curse of dimensionality is to exploit the characteristics of the specific structure of the potential energy surfaces. Rai said this structure information can then be used to approximate the requisite high dimensional functions. "We make use of the fact that although potential energy surfaces can be high dimensional, they can be well approximated as a small sum of products of one-dimensional functions. This is known as the low-rank structure, where the rank of the potential energy surface is the number of terms in the sum," Rai said. "Such an assumption on structure is quite general and has also been used in similar problems in other fields. Mathematically, the intuition of low-rank approximation techniques comes from multilinear algebra where the function is interpreted as a tensor and is decomposed using standard tensor decomposition techniques." The energy and frequency corrections are formulated as integrals of these high-dimensional energy functions. Approximation in such a low-rank format renders these functions easily integrable as it breaks the integration problem to the sum of products of one- or two-dimensional integrals, so standard integration methods apply. The team tried out their computational methods on small molecules such as water and formaldehyde. Compared to the classical Monte Carlo method, the randomness-based standard workhorse for high dimensional integration problems, their approach predicted energy and frequency of water molecule that were more accurate, and it was at least 1,000 times more computationally efficient. Rai said the next step is to further enhance the technique by challenging it with bigger molecules, such as benzene. "Interdisciplinary studies, such as quantum chemistry and combustion engineering, provide opportunities for cross pollination of ideas, thereby providing a new perspective on problems and their possible solutions," Rai said. "It is also a step towards using recent advances in data science as a pillar of scientific discovery in future." Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Sandia has major research and development responsibilities in nuclear deterrence, global security, defense, energy technologies and economic competitiveness, with main facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

FULLERTON, CA--(Marketwired - December 15, 2016) - Premier Mounts is the leading designer, manufacturer, and supplier of standard as well as custom AV and digital signage mounting solutions serving worldwide applications through its USA and Taiwan engineering, manufacturing and distribution facilities. Following up on significant growth in partner services and support during 2016, Premier Mounts is putting additional focus on growing its digital display mounting solutions sales and engineering capabilities by expanding its Solutions Team to further support partner business development on its range of stock and custom products and services including the rapidly evolving market in direct view LED mounts. Tiffany Daugherty joins the team with a depth of experience as an account executive. She will be working directly with our channel partners and re-sellers. Tiffany's role is to keep in constant and ongoing contact to help facilitate and take advantage of applications and projects making sure the channel partners have the right information at the right time and connected with the proper support within Premier Mounts. Mike Devine has been brought on board in the critical area of business development support for the Premier Solutions Group. Mike is an AV industry veteran with many years of experience including 10 years of manufacturing and R&D expertise in developing innovative products. Mike's keen understanding of the customer's final objectives enables him to analyze the opportunity, understand the challenges, and identify effective solutions through his track record of managing OEM and Strategic partnerships. To expand the Premier capabilities even further in terms of both expertise and bandwidth, John Wu has been assigned to the Engineering Solutions Team with the assignment to directly support partner business development initiatives. With an extensive mechanical engineering background, John brings both the design and technical talents that can make the difference in meeting all the objective a partner and end user might have. Shaun O'Brien commented, "with the range of opportunity in digital signage today, these appointments allow us to further support our customers and our partners who face challenges with integrating digital displays into architecture. Expanding the Solutions Group allows us to bring more technical expertise to each opportunity." An internationally known and leading innovator, manufacturer, and distributor of digital display mounting solutions, Premier Mounts has provided state-of-the-art, top-quality mounting systems for the audio visual industry for over 40 years. Premier Mounts works closely with major display manufacturers and customers all over the world and in every market to develop and support OEM and custom-designed products for A/V manufacturers, A/V systems integrators, hospitality and many other markets. Premier Mounts is committed to delivering the utmost in product quality and customer service by continually meeting the needs of our customers. Interested in meeting Mike, Tiffany or John? Contact Premier Mounts by visiting www.PremierMounts.com or calling 714-888-1755.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Brain functions are controlled by millions of brain cells. However, in order to understand how the brain controls functions, such as simple reflexes or learning and memory, we must be able to record the activity of large networks and groups of neurons. Conventional methods have allowed scientists to record the activity of neurons for minutes, but a new technology, developed by University of Calgary researchers, known as a bionic hybrid neuro chip, is able to record activity in animal brain cells for weeks at a much higher resolution. The technological advancement was published in the journal Scientific Reports this month. "These chips are 15 times more sensitive than conventional neuro chips," says Naweed Syed, PhD, scientific director of the University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine's Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and senior author on the study. "This allows brain cell signals to be amplified more easily and to see real time recordings of brain cell activity at a resolution that has never been achieved before." The development of this technology will allow researchers to investigate and understand in greater depth, in animal models, the origins of neurological diseases and conditions such as epilepsy, as well as other cognitive functions such as learning and memory. "Recording this activity over a long period of time allows you to see changes that occur over time, in the activity itself," says Pierre Wijdenes, a PhD student in the Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program and the study's first author. "This helps to understand why certain neurons form connections with each other and why others won't." The cross-faculty team created the chip to mimic the natural biological contact between brain cells, essentially tricking the brain cells into believing that they are connecting with other brain cells. As a result, the cells immediately connect with the chip, thereby allowing researchers to view and record the two-way communication that would go on between two normal functioning brain cells. "We simulated what mother-nature does in nature and provided brain cells with an environment where they feel as if they are at home," says Syed. "This has allowed us to increase the sensitivity of our readings and help neurons build a long-term relationship with our electronic chip." While the chip is currently used to analyze animal brain cells, this increased resolution and the ability to make long-term recordings is bringing the technology one step closer to being effective in the recording of human brain cell activity. "Human brain cell signals are smaller and therefore require more sensitive electronic tools to be designed to pick up the signals," says Colin Dalton, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Schulich School of Engineering and a co-author on this study. Dalton is also the Facility Manager of the University of Calgary's Advanced Micro/nanosystems Integration Facility (AMIF), where the chips were designed and fabricated. Researchers hope the technology will one day be used as a tool to bring personalized therapeutic options to patients facing neurological disease. This discovery was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The University of Calgary's multidisciplinary Engineering Solutions for Health: Biomedical Engineering research strategy is focused on developing solutions for pressing health challenges in disease and injury prevention, diagnosis and treatments. We are also applying systems engineering principles to continuously improve the health system.


Joseph P.G.,Engineering Solutions
Geotechnique | Year: 2010

This note models monotonic soil shear as a dynamical system. It provides additional information to support the hypothesis that for monotonic soil shear, the rates of change of the shear stress, effective normal stress and void ratio are proportional to the applied shear and effective normal stresses with the proportionality values decaying with strain to become zero at the steady-state condition. This hypothesis provides close fits to stress-strain-void ratio curves from undrained shear tests of uncemented, resedimented clays and drained shear tests of uncemented sands and silts, using triaxial and truetriaxial equipment, and various stress paths. For undrained shear, model parameters vary smoothly with over-consolidation ratio; for drained shear, they vary in an orderly way with relative density. The model's value lies in that a well-formed hypothesis, derived from the steady-state condition, provides a simple, alternative approach to current complex elastoplastic models based on critical state theory.


Joseph P.G.,Engineering Solutions
International Journal of Geomechanics | Year: 2013

Previous work indicated that rates of change of shear stress, effective normal stress, and void ratio of a sheared soil are proportional to applied values of shear and effective normal stress; initial proportionality values decay exponentially with strain to become zero at the steadystate condition. This paper proposes that the physical basis for this behavior is an underlying stochastic process in which particles move at random shear strains into the steady-state flow structure under the action of shear stress, countered by frictional resistance generated by the effective normal stress. The resulting dynamical systems model with physical properties closely fits 130 undrained and drained triaxial and true-triaxial shear tests, exhibiting strain softening or strain hardening, using various stress paths, conducted on uncemented, resedimented clays at various overconsolidation ratios (OCRs) and uncemented sands and silts at various relative densities. Parameters varied orderly with OCRs (clays) and confining pressure (silts and sands). The model's value is that based on a simple hypothesis of particles moving into the steady state at random shear strains, it closely matches data from a variety of tests. Present limitations of the model are that it only applies to static loading and not yet to generalized stress paths found in field situations. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

HANOVER, Md., Feb. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Engineering Solutions, Inc. (ESi), a leading provider of software, systems and mission assurance services to the Intelligence Community is pleased to announce the assignments of Mr. Jim Cannaliato, Director of Research and Technology and Ms. Amy...

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