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News Article | April 5, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

Sometimes our immune cells get overzealous, mistake parts of our own bodies for invading pathogens, and launch an attack. This is how autoimmune diseases develop. For example, in multiple sclerosis, immune cells destroy the insulating protein sheath on nerve cells, causing patients to slowly lose motor function. At the American Chemical Society national meeting in San Francisco on Tuesday, researchers reported two biomaterials designed to tell rogue immune cells to stand down. These two types of particles could lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms behind autoimmune diseases and possibly to novel treatments with fewer side effects, said Christopher M. Jewell of the University of Maryland, College Park, who led the work. Current treatments for autoimmune diseases act on cells across the entire immune system, not just the malfunctioning immune cells attacking the body. This suppresses normal parts of patients’ immune systems, making people vulnerable to actual pathogens. “We’d like to have better control over the immune responses we activate and suppress,” Jewell said. He and his colleagues are working on biomaterials that can deliver multiple molecules at once to reprogram those immune responses specific to autoimmune diseases. Previous studies have shown that particles delivering combinations of proteins targeted by the immune system along with immune-regulating molecules can induce tolerance in immune cells. Jewell presented two examples of new biomaterials during a session sponsored by the Polymeric Materials Science & Engineering Division. In one, his team designed poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles that can be injected directly into lymph nodes—tissues that coordinate immune cell functions. The particles are too big to drain from the nodes, so as they slowly degrade, they release their payload just within that local area, avoiding effects elsewhere in the immune system. The particles carried two molecules: rapamycin, which regulates immune cell signaling, and a fragment of myelin, the protein that forms the insulating sheath on nerve cells. Together, these molecules reprogrammed immune cells in the lymph node to stop attacking myelin and instead told inflammatory cells targeting the protein to calm down. A single injection permanently reversed paralysis in mice with multiple sclerosis-like symptoms (Cell Reports 2016, DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.033). But Jewell pointed out that polymers used to make micro- or nanoparticles sometimes can trigger immune responses or inflammation themselves. So he and his colleagues wondered whether they could develop a strategy that didn’t involve traditional biomaterials. The particles they came up with consist of just a pair of immune-reprogramming molecules. The team used a layer-by-layer assembly method to build these materials, starting with a negatively charged calcium carbonate microparticle as a template. Then the researchers alternated between applying a coating of a positively charged myelin fragment and a layer of a negatively charged nucleic acid called GpG, which shuts down signaling for a toll-like receptor. This class of receptors is important in programming the functions of immune cells. After applying a few layers, the researchers dissolved the calcium carbonate particles, leaving behind hollow capsules made from just myelin and GpG. Electrostatic interactions between the layers were strong enough to keep them together. “The capsule is the cargo,” Jewell said. “If you have a traditional polymeric particle loaded with some small molecule drug, then maybe 1-10% is the drug. Here, 100% of the capsule is the drug.” When injected under the skin of mice with multiple sclerosis-like symptoms, the capsules reduced inflammation caused by immune attacks on myelin and prevented the development of paralysis in all animals. The researchers observed a similar reduction in inflammatory responses when they incubated the capsules with cells taken from patients with multiple sclerosis (ACS Nano 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.6b04001). Zhen Gu of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and North Carolina State University said both materials hold promise for clinical translation. In particular, he noted that the simple, straightforward layer-by-layer assembly of the hollow capsules makes those materials attractive for large-scale production. Such particles also could be used in immunotherapies that coax the immune system into attacking tumors, Gu said.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Boulder, Colo. -- May 4, 2017 -- A sounding rocket originally developed as a prototype for NASA's next generation of space-based solar spectrographs will make its third flight tomorrow, May 5, at 12:25 p.m. MDT from White Sands, N.M. The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE), designed and built by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), carries an ultraviolet imaging spectrograph targeting an active region of the Sun to better understand the dynamics that cause solar eruptions. The brief flight, offering five minutes of observations, will coordinate with three orbiting satellites -- the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Hinode Solar Observatory, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) -- to gather multiple data perspectives of the same solar activity. "Using sounding rockets to get out of Earth's atmosphere provides us with fantastic data at a relatively low cost," said RAISE Principal Investigator Dr. Don Hassler of SwRI's Space Science and Engineering Division. "In particular, we expect this flight to provide some of the highest cadence spectral observations of the Sun at these wavelengths ever taken." Scientific research objectives of the flight are to study the small-scale dynamics of coronal loops, the nature of high-frequency waves in the solar atmosphere, and the nature of transient brightenings in the solar network. RAISE previously has flown twice. During a November 2014 flight, the spectrograph gathered 1,500 images of the Sun over that five-minute mission, focusing on the changes occurring near active regions. Its maiden launch, in August 2010, generated observations of the dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona. RAISE is pushing the limits of high-cadence observations. Pushing these limits is challenging, but this is exactly what the NASA sounding rocket program is for," Hassler said. NASA's Sounding Rocket Program oversees the RAISE mission. Despite these brief flight times, sounding rocket missions play a vital role in the NASA mission of advancing new technologies and instrumentation and qualifying them for space in a low-cost, rapid turn-around environment.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Boulder, Colo. -- April 12, 2017 -- Dr. Robin Canup, associate vice president of the Space Science and Engineering Division at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has been named a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The 2017 class of inductees includes leaders from academia, business, public affairs, the humanities and the arts. Academy members contribute to publications and studies of science and technology policy, energy and global security, the humanities and culture, and education. Canup, who joined SwRI in 1998, is particularly known for her studies concerning the formation of planets and their satellites, including her research that demonstrated a single impact from a Mars-sized object could have produced the Earth-Moon system. "This is fantastic recognition for Robin and her research," said Dr. Jim Burch, vice president of SwRI's Space Science and Engineering Division. "Her work has been vastly important to our understanding of the Earth-Moon system and our place in the universe." Canup holds a bachelor's degree in physics from Duke University, and a master's degree and doctorate in astrophysical, planetary and atmospheric sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She has received several honors during her career including the American Astronomical Society Division for Planetary Sciences' Harold Urey Prize (2003) and the American Geophysical Union's Macelwane Medal (2004). She was also named one of Popular Science magazine's "Brilliant 10" young scientists to watch (2004) and was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (2012). Canup will be inducted Oct. 7, 2017, in Cambridge, Mass. Other inductees of the Academy's class of 2017 include singer-songwriter John Legend, mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani, writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and award-winning actress Carol Burnett. Editors: A photo to accompany this story is available at: http://www.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: phys.org

The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE), designed and built by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), carries an ultraviolet imaging spectrograph targeting an active region of the Sun to better understand the dynamics that cause solar eruptions. The brief flight, offering five minutes of observations, will coordinate with three orbiting satellites—the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Hinode Solar Observatory, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS)—to gather multiple data perspectives of the same solar activity. "Using sounding rockets to get out of Earth's atmosphere provides us with fantastic data at a relatively low cost," said RAISE Principal Investigator Dr. Don Hassler of SwRI's Space Science and Engineering Division. "In particular, we expect this flight to provide some of the highest cadence spectral observations of the Sun at these wavelengths ever taken." Scientific research objectives of the flight are to study the small-scale dynamics of coronal loops, the nature of high-frequency waves in the solar atmosphere, and the nature of transient brightenings in the solar network. RAISE previously has flown twice. During a November 2014 flight, the spectrograph gathered 1,500 images of the Sun over that five-minute mission, focusing on the changes occurring near active regions. Its maiden launch, in August 2010, generated observations of the dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona. RAISE is pushing the limits of high-cadence observations. Pushing these limits is challenging, but this is exactly what the NASA sounding rocket program is for," Hassler said. NASA's Sounding Rocket Program oversees the RAISE mission. Despite these brief flight times, sounding rocket missions play a vital role in the NASA mission of advancing new technologies and instrumentation and qualifying them for space in a low-cost, rapid turn-around environment. Explore further: Sounding rocket will take 1,500 images of sun in five minutes


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

I’m laughing. While watching an Apple video. That’s not normal. A typical Apple promotional video has a type: Clean, dispassionate, slightly British (thanks Jony Ive) and self-congratulatory. It’s not quirky, whimsical, or funny. But each of the four short animated stories detailing Apple’s efforts to become a 100 percent renewable company and released just a few days before Earth Day, are unlike anything Apple has produced before. What’s more interesting is that the audio is 100 percent true and, taken by itself, not particularly funny. But when combined with the hand-drawn animation from illustrator James Blagden the stories become whimsical and even a little odd. SEE ALSO: Your iPhone's camera could one day scan a room to pick out faces The standout is a roughly minute-long spot called “Why Does Apple Make its Own Sweat?” In it Apple’s Environmental Technologies Group lead Rob Guzzo explains how and why Apple chose to stop buying artificial sweat and started creating its own. Guzzo, who is depicted in the cartoon, offers a pretty straight forward account of the decisions, but Blagden’s animation embellishes with images of armpits and even one of an Apple lab tech tasting the artificial sweat. “We knew from the start that we wanted this to be engaging in a different way to tell the stories,” said Apple VP of Environment, Policy & Social Initiatives Lisa Jackson. Jackson told me that simply explaining what Apple’s doing in the environmental space doesn’t really convey the work or the people behind it. The goal of the animations is to boil it down and make the complex work of environmentalism more tangible and digestible and to highlight the “unsung” people doing the work. However, it’s the unusual blend of unscripted Apple employees’ voices, including Jackson’s, and the whimsical visuals that really transforms the spots. “When it’s unscripted and in their own voice, people tend to pay attention and just get it,” she said. Bladgen, who is probably best known for his Dock Ellis & The LSD No-No short on how a Major League Baseball pitcher threw a no-hitter while on LSD, still sounded surprised at some of the places Apple let him take the visuals. “I didn’t think the bit where he tastes the sweat, I didn’t think they were going to go for it,” laughed Blagden, who told me he prefers drier material like the Apple environmental story and then finding the humor in it. For the story of Apple’s solution for accommodating solar panels and grazing yaks in China, Bladgen perfectly illustrated Apple’s solution: putting the solar panels higher so the light could reach them and the ground below. However, he also put a yak at a dinner table, eating grass with a fork. When Jackson, who narrates the spot (an animated version of her appears in it), mentions the need for creative solutions, Blagden illustrated her and the yak painting portraits of each other. “One of the coolest things that will ever happen to me: hip artist James Blagden rendering how I will look in his world,” said Jackson. There’s even a “Where’s Waldo” element to the four spots, with an animated Apple CEO Tim Cook popping up in each video. In one, he’s inside the new and soon-to-be-opened Apple Park, which relies on cooled water and air circulated from the outside for air conditioning, breathing in the office's fresh air. Blagden, who spent four months working on the animations, couldn’t recall whose idea it was for all the Cook cameos, but he does recall that when Apple execs had to present the unusual collection of videos to Cook. “I know there was a big meeting with him where he signed off, it was a pretty big deal. Everyone was really nervous,” he said. Perhaps Cook signed off because he, knew that now is the time for something different. Jackson, who served as the head of the Environmental Protection Agency from 2009 to 2013, an agency that is being gutted by President Donald Trump's administration (there are proposals to cut its budget by at least 31%), wouldn’t address President Trump directly. But there’s a recognition that the stakes are higher this year and a new, more in-your-face approach to environmental story-telling is necessary. Apple's spaceship-style Apple Park looks just as good in cartoon form. “What we knew we wanted this year more than ever, in this time, to connect people to environmental story,” said Jackson. Apple and businesses like it have a huge role to play in leadership, she said. “We’re not walking away from that," Jackson said. In Silicon Valley, Apple is known for setting ambitious environmental goals, while still facing many of the same challenges that plague the industry overall, namely supply chain pollution, rare Earth mineral use, and data center energy consumption. While the videos focus on some of the smaller stories in Apple’s environmental efforts, its goals remain, for lack of a better word, huge. The California tech giant powers nearly all its data centers, offices, and retail stores worldwide with renewable energy. About 96 percent of its direct electricity use came from wind, solar, and other clean sources in 2016, the company said in its latest environmental progress report. However, that doesn’t cover all the carbon emissions related to manufacturing iPhones, iPads, and other Apple products. About 77 percent of the company’s total carbon footprint comes from manufacturing sites and companies that Apple neither owns nor directly operates, the company said in 2016. Jackson said the company is focused on tackling climate change, and not just through its own efforts. “If we zeroed out our carbon footprint ... that would not solve the problem. We need businesses and people running on clean energy… The only way to tackle climate change, it has to be bigger than what we can do,” said Jackson. With so much progress made on the renewable energy side, Apple is now attacking the much trickier carbon footprint of its supply chain.  That’s why Apple is pushing its partners to jump on the clean energy bandwagon, too. Seven of Apple’s major suppliers have pledged to power their Apple production entirely with renewable energy by the end of 2018. Together, Apple and its suppliers will generate or purchase more than 4,000 megawatts of new renewable energy globally by 2020, half of which will be built in China. These efforts are already starting to pay off. In 2016, Apple’s comprehensive carbon footprint was 29.5 million metric tons – a 23 percent drop from 2015’s total of 38.4 million tons. Still, there is a long way for the company to go when it comes to becoming a 100 percent renewable company, and more challenges to tackle too, including the use of rare earth minerals and the e-waste problem. On Thursday, Apple became the first major IT company to commit to using 100 percent recycled materials for its products, though it is not clear how quickly it will be able to accomplish this. The company has also made an effort to reclaim materials from used iPhones. Last year, Apple unvield LIAM, the 29-armed recycling robot that dismantles used iPhone 6 devices. Apple wants to be a zero waste company. One of the cartoons tells the true tale of their efforts. In one video entitled “Can We Produce Zero Waste,” John Reynolds who works in Apple’s iPhone Product Operations, finds that Apple’s factories are discarding towers of pallets. His initial solution is to recycle them. In the video, Reynolds recounts how he got his wrist slapped by Apple execs for not going far enough. Apple wants to eliminate waste in the production of its popular products. The video ends, though, without a resolution. “Their solution is that there actually are many of our final assembly facilities, in China, U.S., Cork, Ireland, all certified by UL as zero waste,” said Jackson. The job of finding smart, safe ways to test and manufacturer Apple’s new products falls, in part, on Rob Guzzo. His Environmental Technologies Group, which is part of Apple’s Hardware Engineering Division, is responsible for supporting environmental initiatives on Apple’s products. Guzzo defines his group’s responsibilities as mitigating the impact of climate change, reducing dependency on finite resources and using safer materials. Apple needs artificial sweat, Guzzo explained, because, “One of the most important elements of products, from safety perspective, are those that are contact with skin for a long time.” Apple Pencil, AirPods and Apple Watch top that list. Testing with sweat is a great way to simulate human wear, but collecting real human sweat was deemed impractical and “gross.” For a time, the company purchased frozen artificial sweat, but they soon realized it made more sense to create it in house. The mixture is purified water, salt, lactic acid and urea. Each day, a lab tech produces a half gallon.  The road to  being a 100% renewable company isn;t easy, but apparently it can be funny. Guzzo said having their own “sweat supply” and in-house toxicologists to analyze the effect of the solution on product materials (usually they test on pre-production models) means that the results can be used to influence final designs and materials. It’s a fascinating story, but depicted in more entertaining fashion in the video where the guy who makes the sweat wears a “Sweat Guy” hat and holds up an Eeu de Sweat perfume bottle – all Blagden touches.  “I never would have imagined that the creative minds at Apple would have been able to come up with a video like that to tell the story about making sweat,” Guzzo told me. “We prefer to say unique, not weird, but we’ll take weird as long as funny is included. You never know when you’re going to spark the imagination and intelligence of next environmentalist.”  Jackson believes Apple can set an environmental example for others even as the EPA relinquishes its leadership role. “There’s a parade going on to cleaner and low carbon economy. Apple is in the parade, as are businesses, states, cities, activists. Having worked at EPA for more than two decades, it would be great if EPA assumed its normal spot at head of parade, but parade is moving on either way.”


HERNDON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has awarded Teracore, Inc. (Teracore) a prime contract to provide systems engineering and technical assistance to the Operations and Engineering Division (OED) of the Component’s Office of Information Technology. The mixed type, multiple year contract has a value of $31.5M. OED provides IT infrastructure and technical support to the TSA mission. This support is provided to all TSA sites, personnel and contractors. Teracore will serve as technical and operational oversight and advisory services for the IT infrastructure support contract within TSA’s portfolio to include ITIP Bridge, IMPACT, and DHS Data Center task orders. Task areas include Quality Assurance and Oversight, Technical and Business Operations Support for Cloud and As-A Service, Business and Management Support, and Technical Oversight Support for Cloud, XaaService and Data Center Migration Activities. “Having supported TSA since 2006, we are thrilled to have been chosen for this engagement. We will leverage our management and technical consulting expertise to continue to support the TSA mission to secure the U.S. transportation systems,” said Luis Perez, Teracore’s president and chief executive officer. Teracore is a VetBiz Certified Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) headquartered in Atlanta, GA with offices in the Washington, D.C. metro area. For more than 14 years, we have provided process-driven management and enterprise IT consulting services across the Federal Government to solve their most difficult challenges. Teracore has previously received the DHS Small Business Achievement Award in recognition of sustained exceptional support of the homeland security mission. For additional information on Teracore, please visit http://www.teracore.com.


News Article | August 29, 2016
Site: phys.org

"This novel, low-cost prototype was developed for less than $1 million, which is one-tenth the cost of other comparable balloon-borne observatories," said Principal Investigator Dr. Craig DeForest, a principal scientist in SwRI's Space Science and Engineering Division. "Funded by NASA's Game-Changing Technologies program, SSIPP is a reusable, optical table-based platform. This novel approach breaks down barriers to science by allowing low-cost solar research." SSIPP collects solar data using infrared, ultraviolet, or visible light instruments on an optical table, similar to those used in ground-based observatories but from a near-space environment. This arcsecond-class observatory provides optical precision equivalent to imaging a dime from a mile away. Originally conceived to fly aboard a commercial suborbital rocket, SSIPP has now been adapted for balloon flight. Collecting data from the edge of space—around 20 miles above the Earth's surface—avoids image distortions caused by looking through the atmosphere. "SSIPP could support the development of a range of new instruments for the near-space environment at relatively low cost," DeForest said. "Using a standard optical table platform increases flexibility, allowing scientists to try new things and develop new technologies without designing a custom observatory." During the demonstration, scientists will spend two hours commissioning the observatory and searching for visible signatures of "high-frequency" solar soundwaves, which are actually some eight octaves below the deepest audible notes. By contrast, the most studied sound waves in the Sun (the solar "P-modes" used to probe the solar interior) are five octaves deeper still. The surface of the Sun is covered with granular convection cells analogous to a pot of water at a rolling boil. Continuously, every 5 minutes, a million of these cells erupt, creating sound waves at a range of frequencies. SSIPP will image the solar atmosphere to understand their heat and noise properties. The comparatively high frequency of the "solar ultrasound" waves makes them undetectable by ground-based observatories. "The transfer of heat to the surface of our star is a violent and tremendously loud process," DeForest said. "Soundwaves heat the solar atmosphere to extremely high temperatures, but it's a poorly understood process. Existing measurements of the solar infrasound cannot account for all the energy required." SSIPP will launch aboard a World View stratospheric balloon, funded by NASA's Flight Opportunities Program under the Space Technology Mission Directorate. The program is managed by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. Explore further: SwRI to build miniature solar observatory for manned suborbital flight


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (TOMI) (OTCQX:TOMZ), a global bacteria decontamination and infection prevention company, and its board of directors announced the formation and approval of  TOMI’s scientific advisory board. “We are honored William, Miguel and Helene – experts in intellectual property law, biosafety and infection prevention, respectively – have agreed to join our scientific advisory board,” stated Dr. Halden Shane, TOMI’s Chief Executive Officer. “We believe their support validates TOMI’s groundbreaking SteraMist™, and their guidance will help TOMI in "Innovating for a Safer World.” The team is charged with constructively challenging management to help develop strategy; ensuring the necessary resources are in place to enable us to achieve objectives in scientific research and development; and monitoring technological and regulatory trends that could impact our business as well as our performance against our goals. We believe their insight will be invaluable.” William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD is a consultant and advisor to a series of biotech and life sciences companies. Dr. Brown is a seasoned attorney in intellectual property with deep experience in healthcare-related matters. He is licensed to practice law in several states and is a registered patent attorney. His consulting experience includes intellectual property portfolio management, clinical trial contracts, and patent/business development matters. He holds a PhD from the University of Southampton, England, an MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and a JD from New York Law School. Dr. Brown conducted postdoctoral research at Harvard, Johnson & Johnson, NIH, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng is an Assistant Professor for the Department of Pathology, Director of Institutional Biocontainment Resources at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) and the Director of the Biocontainment Engineering Division for the Galveston National Laboratory. His responsibilities include the review of all design, construction, commissioning and operation of High and Maximum containment laboratories as well as to ensure regulatory compliance and to conduct ongoing evaluation and recertification on all critical containment features, equipment and operations for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3), Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL3) and Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4) laboratory facilities at UTMB. He is also a member of the UTMB Institutional Biosafety Committee. He has served as Committee Member for development of the ANSI Z9.14‐2014 Standard ‐ Testing and Performance‐Verification Methodologies for Ventilation Systems for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3) and Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL‐3) facilities as well as for the 2016 Edition of the National Institute of Health (NIH) ‐ Design Requirements Manual (DRM) for Biomedical Laboratories and Animal Research Facilities. Miguel routinely serves as Biocontainment Advisor for containment laboratories nationally and internationally on design, construction and operations and also routinely contributes to a technical column in the American Biological Safety Association (ABSA) journal, Applied Biosafety entitled, “Containment Talk”. Mr. Grimaldo obtained his Masters of Engineering from the University of Louisville and Bachelor of Science degrees in Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University. Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC, is an Infection Preventionist, owner of Bio Guidance, LLC, adjunct biology professor at Rowan University and Director of Infection Prevention at Saint Francis Healthcare. She is Infection Control Certified (CIC), board certified as an International Medical Laboratory Scientist and holds a PhD in Epidemiology. Dr. Paxton has 40 plus years’ experience in medical devices and infectious disease consulting. Dr. Paxton obtained her PhD from Kennedy Western University and her MS from Bowling Green State University. Scientific Advisory Board Provisions and criteria have been set in the company's bylaws and scientific advisory board charter. TOMI’s scientific advisory board will always observe in the letter and spirit the duties, rights and role as a member of the company's board as stipulated in the relevant listing standards. About TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (OTCQX:TOMZ) is a global bacteria decontamination and infectious disease control company, providing eco-friendly environmental solutions for indoor surface disinfection through manufacturing, sales and licensing of its premier platform of Hydrogen Peroxide based product that uses Binary Ionization Technology® (BIT™) , a state of the art technology for the production of its Activated Ionized Hydrogen Peroxide mist represented by the TOMI™ SteraMist™ brand. TOMI’s products are designed to service a broad spectrum of commercial structures including hospitals and medical facilities, cruise ships, office buildings, hotel and motel rooms, schools, restaurants, for non-food safety in meat and produce processing facilities, military barracks, and athletic facilities. TOMI’s products and services have also been used in single-family homes and multi-unit residences. TOMI also develops training programs and application protocols for its clients and is a member in good standing with The American Biological Safety Association, The American Association of Tissue Banks, Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, The Restoration Industry Association, Indoor Air Quality Association, and The International Ozone Association. For additional product information, visit www.tomimist.com or contact us at info@tomimist.com. Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 Certain written and oral statements made by us may constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Reform Act”). Forward-looking statements are identified by such words and phrases as “we expect,” “expected to,” “estimates,” “estimated,” “current outlook,” “we look forward to,” “would equate to,” “projects,” “projections,” “projected to be,” “anticipates,” “anticipated,” “we believe,” “could be,” and other similar phrases. All statements addressing operating performance, events, or developments that we expect or anticipate will occur in the future, including statements relating to revenue growth, earnings, earnings-per-share growth, or similar projections, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Reform Act. They are forward-looking, and they should be evaluated in light of important risk factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from our anticipated results. The information provided in this document is based upon the facts and circumstances known at this time. We undertake no obligation to update these forward-looking statements after the date of this release.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Principals Trena Adair and Leslie Davis announced an expansion in Harbor Environmental and Safety’s (Harbor) ownership and Board of Directors in August. Andrew Rike, P.E., Vice President of Harbor’s Engineering Division, is now a partner in Harbor and has been appointed as Secretary on Harbor’s Board of Directors. He holds his Masters of Science in Environmental Engineering from North Carolina State University, and his Bachelors in Civil Engineering from Christian Brothers University in Memphis. Andrew has lead Harbor’s Engineering Team since 2011 and was integral to the successful transition of Blaylock Threet. Most recently, before joining Harbor, Andrew owned his own civil design and consulting company, Rike Consulting. Principal Leslie Davis stated, “The fast pace at which we were growing in 2011 made hiring a professional engineer an obvious choice. Having worked with Andrew in the past, we knew that he was the right person to diversify our business. Andrew’s experience in civil design, as well as the environmental work in his background, have allowed us to provide a complete package of services to our clients. We are very happy to see him taking on a larger role in our continued growth.” Mr. Rike added, “From 2011 to the present, we have really responded to the needs of our clients with the addition of both civil and environmental engineering expertise, including the addition of the well-respected, experienced local engineering group Blaylock Threet Engineers in February 2015. Overall, our engineering team has four Professional Engineers, an engineer in training, a 32 year veteran CADD designer, and an experienced survey crew. I am excited to see where this next transition takes us!” In addition, Harbor elected Tresa Adair, Vice President of Operations, as Treasurer on the Board of Directors. Ms. Adair has a long history in both marketing and financial management in Fortune 500 companies, start-ups, and a recently founded non-profit corporation. Holding a Finance Degree from the University of Massachusetts, she has had the rare capability to marry financial management with her marketing skills over the past 22 years. Trena Adair commented, “It’s a unique opportunity for Harbor to have a sales and marketing mind coupled with seasoned financial management experience. After being with Harbor for five years now, her guidance in business and marketing strategy has been integral in growing and adjusting our business as we have expanded. Tresa’s leadership in the company and her willingness to ‘do whatever needs done’ has certainly made her a critical part of our team.“ As well as expanding the leadership within the organization, Harbor moved their corporate headquarters effective September 30th. Tresa Adair indicated, “Many factors contributed to our decision to leave our current location. Not only have we been at capacity for over a year now, but our building was sold and the current owner will be occupying most of the building once our lease expired. We will still be located in the heart of Little Rock, but, this new building ultimately has capacity that will allow for our projected growth over the next five to 10 years.” Harbor's new location is just off University at 5800 Evergreen Drive, Little Rock, AR 72205. All phone and fax numbers will remain the same. Harbor Environmental and Safety is a full service environmental, safety and engineering consulting firm headquartered in Little Rock, Arkansas. Harbor is a certified woman-owned and certified disadvantaged business enterprise that has served clients both nationally and internationally. Specializing in turnkey compliance management systems, Harbor affords our clients the ability to focus on their business goals and maintain a commitment to the environment and the health and safety of their employees. Ultimately, Harbor is dedicated to the like-minded cause of affecting positive change in business practices that create greater profitability for clients and increased sustainability for our shared environment.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« DOE to award up to $1.2M to project converting wastewater solids to biogas and liquid fuels; hydrothermal processing | Main | POSCO begins lithium production for first time in Korea; domestic supply for Samsung, LG; investing $261M in anode materials by 2020 » WiTricity is collaborating with Nissan to further the adoption of wireless EV charging systems. Both companies are participating in the SAE International J2954 standardization effort for wireless power transfer. (Earlier post.) The two companies collaborated to submit a joint design system (built using WiTricity’s DRIVE system) to the task force; that circular topology was selected by the SAE International J2954 Taskforce in January as the official test station against which EV wireless charging systems will be tested for interoperability and standards compliance. (Earlier post.) Products developed by carmakers, Tier 1 suppliers and charging infrastructure suppliers will be measured against 3.7 kW and 7.7 kW test stations (WPT 1 and WPT2; the J2954 team also envisions light duty charging rates of 11 kW (WPT3) and 22 kW (WPT4). The goal of this standardization is to ensure interoperability and performance between the wide range of electrified vehicles being developed by carmakers worldwide, and the wireless charging stations that will be widely deployed to streamline the charging of the next generation of EVs and PHEVs. The SAE J2954 Taskforce has been working since 2010 to develop the specifications and standards needed to achieve seamless interoperability. In December 2016, bench testing for the J2954 taskforce at Idaho National Laboratory demonstrated interoperability between the so-called Double D (DD) and Circular Topologies between 3.7 to 7.7 kW with efficiencies exceeding 85-90% under aligned conditions. (Earlier post.) WiTricity’s DRIVE series of EV reference designs include 3.7 kW, 7.7 kW and 11 kW, scaling to 22 kW and higher, and is based on the company’s patented magnetic resonance technology. These designs deliver end-to-end efficiency of 91%-94% and combine WiTricity’s Tunable Matching Network (TMN) technology with its circular coil design. TMN technology allows the wireless charging system to automatically optimize energy transfer between the ground and vehicle in a wide range of real world operating conditions including parking misalignment, differing vehicle ground clearance and varying battery voltage conditions. This flexibility enables wirelessly charged vehicles to interoperate more easily with standards-based charging sources made by different automakers, Tier 1 suppliers and infrastructure suppliers. WiTricity’s TMN technology is delivered as a compact electronics module embodying proprietary hardware and software algorithms, to be incorporated into both the wireless charging source on the ground and the wireless power capture device on the vehicle. WiTricity’s DRIVE system is able to maximize efficiency and power delivery over a broad range of parking alignment, battery voltage, and power conditions. In addition, WiTricity’s DRIVE 11 offers direct-to-battery charging to eliminate system losses associated with DC-DC converters and onboard chargers and can be configured to handle a wide range of battery voltage including the latest 800V packs used for next-generation high performance EVs. Nissan, together with other carmakers, has recognized that interoperability is critical for simplifying the EV charging experience and adoption of EVs more broadly. This means ensuring car owners they can charge their vehicles at any station regardless of vehicle size and type. Nissan believes in the potential of wireless charging to help advance widespread acceptance of EV motoring. We are very pleased to be working with a technology expert such as WiTricity to advance the state of the art for interoperability, efficiency, and user friendliness. —Kazuo Yajima, Alliance Global Director of the EV and HEV Engineering Division of Nissan

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