Enervana Technologies LLC

Baton Rouge, LA, United States

Enervana Technologies LLC

Baton Rouge, LA, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Chen K.,Louisiana State University | Meng W.J.,Louisiana State University | Mei F.,Enervana Technologies LLC | Hiller J.,Argonne National Laboratory | Miller D.J.,Argonne National Laboratory
Acta Materialia | Year: 2011

A single crystal Al specimen was molded at room temperature with long, rectangular, strip diamond punches. Quantitative molding response curves were obtained at a series of punch widths, ranging from 5 μm to 550 nm. A significant size effect was observed, manifesting itself in terms of significantly increasing characteristic molding pressure as the punch width decreases to 1.5 μm and below. A detailed comparison of the present strip punch molding results was made with Berkovich pyramidal indentation on the same single crystal Al specimen. The comparison reveals distinctly different dependence of the characteristic pressure on corresponding characteristic length. The present results show the feasibility of micro-/nano-scale compression molding as a micro-/nano-fabrication technique, and offer an experimental test case for size-dependent plasticity theories. © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Lu B.,Louisiana State University | Meng W.J.,Louisiana State University | Mei F.,Enervana Technologies LLC
Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering | Year: 2013

Cu-based, single- and double-layered, microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) were fabricated and assembled. Comparative measurements on liquid flow characteristics and heat transfer performance were conducted on these devices. Results were compared at the individual microchannel level as well as at the device level. The present results demonstrate that double-layered MHEs exhibit similar heat transfer performance while suffering a much lower pressure drop penalty compared to single-layered MHEs. Another Cu-based, double-layered, liquid-liquid counter-flow MHE was fabricated, assembled and tested. Results show that a low-volume, multilayered, high-performance, liquid-to-liquid MHE is achievable following the manufacturing protocols of the present double-layered, liquid-liquid counter-flow MHE. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Lu B.,Louisiana State University | Mei F.,Enervana Technologies LLC | Meng W.J.,Louisiana State University | Guo S.,Louisiana State University
Heat Transfer Engineering | Year: 2013

Microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) have become a leading candidate for applications demanding removal of highly concentrated heat, including cooling of future generation high-performance microelectronic and power-electronic modules. Metal-based MHEs offer potential advantages over silicon-based counterparts in terms of overall heat transfer performance and mechanical robustness. Low-cost fabrication of metal-based MHEs and quantitative evaluation of their liquid flow and heat transfer characteristics are essential for establishing the technical feasibility and economic viability of such devices. Adoption of metal-based MHEs in many applications demands quantification of liquid flow and heat transfer performance with application-relevant coolants, for example, ethylene glycol (EG)/water mixtures rather than pure water. As a first step in this direction, we report here fabrication and assembly of all-Cu MHE prototypes, as well as results of flow and heat transfer testing using pure water and pure EG as the liquid medium. Results of heat transfer testing indicate sensitivity of overall heat transfer performance to entrance length effects. In the case of pure EG, the thermal entrance length is significantly influenced by its Prandtl number value under different testing conditions. Varying testing conditions led to differences in the Prandtl number, and consequently the heat transfer performance. © 2013 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Lu B.,Louisiana State University | Chen K.,Louisiana State University | Meng W.J.,Louisiana State University | Mei F.,Enervana Technologies LLC
Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering | Year: 2010

Low-profile, Cu-based microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) with different geometric dimensions were fabricated, bonded and assembled. A transient liquid phase (TLP) process was used for bonding of Cu-based MHEs with total thicknesses ranging from 600 μm to 1700 μm. The structural integrity of TLP-bonded Cu MHEs was examined. Device-level heat transfer testing was performed on a series of Cu-based MHEs to study the influence of microchannel dimensions on overall heat transfer performance, corroborated by computational results from a simple 2D finite element analysis. The present results demonstrate the promise of low-profile metallic MHEs for high heat flux cooling applications. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2009

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a compact, metalbased, sealed, recirculating, fluid cooling system for electronic devices. Metal-based microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) have potential advantages over Si-based devices in terms of thermal performance and mechanical robustness. The proposed fabrication technology is unique and provides a means to low-cost, high-throughput, mass production of high efficiency, microchannel cooling systems for micro-electronic and power-electronic devices. Efficient fabrication of metal-based MHEs and quantitative flow and heat transfer measurements on them are critical for establishing the economic and technical feasibility of such devices. The proposing team has spearheaded the development of metallic high-aspect-ratio microscale structures (HARMSs) fabrication by molding replication, a potentially low-cost, high-throughput, mass production technique. This proposal will focus on the fabrication, assembly, and testing of metallic MHE based heat absorption modules and metallic MHE assembly based heat rejection modules. The team will 1) build all-metal, compact, high-efficiency, heat absorption/rejection module prototypes, 2) test these prototypes and quantify their heat transfer performance, 3) establish the engineering protocol for optimizing MHE geometries. The testing results on MHE-assembly based heat rejection modules will be benchmarked against competing devices. Traditional air cooling technology has become a limiting factor for current generation high performance electronic devices and will be insufficient for removing heat generated from new generation micro-electronic and power-electronic devices. Successful execution of this proposal will provide a novel, high-efficiency, microchannel fluid cooling technique for these new generation devices. The target product of this proposal will be marketed to computer original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), such as Intel, IBM, Apple, Dell, Lenovo, etc., and is believed to enjoy performance and cost advantages over competing devices currently being contemplated. The study on the fabrication and heat transfer testing of metal-based MHEs with complicated designs will enhance scientific and technological understanding related to both science of manufacturing and fluid flow and heat transfer. This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5).


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 614.88K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to develop a compact, metal-based, recirculating liquid cooling system for next-generation electronic devices. The dramatic increase in computing power over several decades has been accompanied by an equally dramatic increase in the heat generated at the electronic module level. It is generally accepted that forced air cooling, the dominant cooling technology of today, will not be sufficient for high performance devices of tomorrow. Alternative cooling technologies with higher performance and lower area/volume footprint have become critical for better-performing computing devices. A significant market is expected for such advanced chip cooling technologies. Metal-based microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) combine high heat flux removal capacity, low area/volume footprint, as well as high mechanical integrity, and constitute a leading technological contender for replacing forced air cooling. This project will focus on design and fabrication of metal-based MHEs and MHE assemblies as heat absorption and rejection modules with improved heat transfer performance, assembly of recirculating-liquid MHE systems, and benchmarking against competing technologies. The study on the design, fabrication, and heat transfer testing of metal-based MHEs will enhance scientific and technological understanding related to micromanufacturing, as well as microchannel liquid flow and heat transfer.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is tied into the ultimate project goal of incorporating liquid-based chip cooling technology with the best performance into next-generation desktop personal computers and other microelectronic and powerelectronic devices. The planned recirculating-liquid MHE chip cooling system is envisioned to become a critical enabler of higher performance and higher power electronic devices. A quick review of the progress in computing devices over the last few decades and the associated societal changes serves to convince that increased computing power in the hands of imaginative people can unleash unforeseen innovations. Successful execution of this project will push to the market place a product that can serve a catalytic role in such an innovation unleashing process. The target product will be marketed to computer original equipment manufacturers and is shown to enjoy performance and cost advantages over competing devices currently being contemplated. The project goal is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technologies to the point of production readiness. Successful execution of this project will help to establish the commercial viability of a technology-based manufacturing company with potential for positive economic impact and job creation.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 499.38K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to develop a compact, metal-based, recirculating liquid cooling system for next-generation electronic devices. The dramatic increase in computing power over several decades has been accompanied by an equally dramatic increase in the heat generated at the electronic module level. It is generally accepted that forced air cooling, the dominant cooling technology of today, will not be sufficient for high performance devices of tomorrow. Alternative cooling technologies with higher performance and lower area/volume footprint have become critical for better-performing computing devices. A significant market is expected for such advanced chip cooling technologies. Metal-based microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) combine high heat flux removal capacity, low area/volume footprint, as well as high mechanical integrity, and constitute a leading technological contender for replacing forced air cooling. This project will focus on design and fabrication of metal-based MHEs and MHE assemblies as heat absorption and rejection modules with improved heat transfer performance, assembly of recirculating-liquid MHE systems, and benchmarking against competing technologies. The study on the design, fabrication, and heat transfer testing of metal-based MHEs will enhance scientific and technological understanding related to micromanufacturing, as well as microchannel liquid flow and heat transfer. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is tied into the ultimate project goal of incorporating liquid-based chip cooling technology with the best performance into next-generation desktop personal computers and other microelectronic and powerelectronic devices. The planned recirculating-liquid MHE chip cooling system is envisioned to become a critical enabler of higher performance and higher power electronic devices. A quick review of the progress in computing devices over the last few decades and the associated societal changes serves to convince that increased computing power in the hands of imaginative people can unleash unforeseen innovations. Successful execution of this project will push to the market place a product that can serve a catalytic role in such an innovation unleashing process. The target product will be marketed to computer original equipment manufacturers and is shown to enjoy performance and cost advantages over competing devices currently being contemplated. The project goal is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technologies to the point of production readiness. Successful execution of this project will help to establish the commercial viability of a technology-based manufacturing company with potential for positive economic impact and job creation.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2010

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a compact, metalbased, sealed, recirculating, fluid cooling system for electronic devices. Metal-based microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) have potential advantages over Si-based devices in terms of thermal performance and mechanical robustness. The proposed fabrication technology is unique and provides a means to low-cost, high-throughput, mass production of high efficiency, microchannel cooling systems for micro-electronic and power-electronic devices. Efficient fabrication of metal-based MHEs and quantitative flow and heat transfer measurements on them are critical for establishing the economic and technical feasibility of such devices. The proposing team has spearheaded the development of metallic high-aspect-ratio microscale structures (HARMSs) fabrication by molding replication, a potentially low-cost, high-throughput, mass production technique. This proposal will focus on the fabrication, assembly, and testing of metallic MHE based heat absorption modules and metallic MHE assembly based heat rejection modules. The team will 1) build all-metal, compact, high-efficiency, heat absorption/rejection module prototypes, 2) test these prototypes and quantify their heat transfer performance, 3) establish the engineering protocol for optimizing MHE geometries. The testing results on MHE-assembly based heat rejection modules will be benchmarked against competing devices.

Traditional air cooling technology has become a limiting factor for current generation high performance electronic devices and will be insufficient for removing heat generated from new generation micro-electronic and power-electronic devices. Successful execution of this proposal will provide a novel, high-efficiency, microchannel fluid cooling technique for these new generation devices. The target product of this proposal will be marketed to computer original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), such as Intel, IBM, Apple, Dell, Lenovo, etc., and is believed to enjoy performance and cost advantages over competing devices currently being contemplated. The study on the fabrication and heat transfer testing of metal-based MHEs with complicated designs will enhance scientific and technological understanding related to both science of manufacturing and fluid flow and heat transfer.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.96K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project concerns the design and high-throughput and low-cost manufacturing of metal-based miniature gas chromatograph (mGC) sensor structures. The proposed mGC sensor design and manufacturing is unique and offers competitive advantages as compared to current "micro GC" devices/systems on the market. Miniaturized GC Sensors are envisioned to become the building blocks for future GC instruments, in which each mGC module can perform a separate analytical function. Analytical instruments containing multiple mGCs can be tailored to provide analyses of compounds with widely different chemical characteristics. Such instruments may become "niche analyzers" for field analytical use not possible with current capabilities. Design and efficient fabrication of high-reliability, low-cost, metal-based, mGC sensors are critical for establishing the technical and commercial feasibility of such devices. The project team combines extensive expertise on GC design, testing, and applications as well as microfabrication of metal-based high-aspect-ratio microscale structures (HARMS). Fabrication of metallic HARMS by molding replication, combined with efficient microscale bonding, promises low-cost, high-throughput, mGC device production with high reliability. The proposed methodology offers competitive advantages compared to silicon-based integrated-circuit processing techniques and represents a good opportunity for pushing metal-based mGC sensors to commercially-viable products. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is multifaceted and significant. Miniature GC sensor modules can be a device that promotes efficiency and improvements throughout industry and society. For example, better monitoring improves the quality of chemical products. On-site monitoring and processing of multi-point compositional information improves chemical plant efficiencies and the control of process upsets. Early detection of emissions from leaks prevents pollution, and helps industry meet clean air compliance requirements. Effective monitoring assures water quality and alleviates public health concerns. The availability of mGC sensors will eliminate many field sampling activities connected to laboratory analysis. Real-time monitoring lowers compliance cost of environmental regulations and fines, and accelerates the permit process. Increased security at airports and public facilities lessens public apprehension and reduce time delays. Detection of disease earlier and more cheaply improves health care. As such, significant market interest exists for the proposed technology. The proposed mGC sensors may enable many new and yet unrealized applications. This is where the mGC sensor modules will have it greatest potential for market expansion. By focusing on such market expansion opportunities, the presently proposed project combines technical innovation with commercial promise.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 149.96K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project concerns the design and high-throughput and low-cost manufacturing of metal-based miniature gas chromatograph (mGC) sensor structures. The proposed mGC sensor design and manufacturing is unique and offers competitive advantages as compared to current micro GC devices/systems on the market. Miniaturized GC Sensors are envisioned to become the building blocks for future GC instruments, in which each mGC module can perform a separate analytical function. Analytical instruments containing multiple mGCs can be tailored to provide analyses of compounds with widely different chemical characteristics. Such instruments may become niche analyzers for field analytical use not possible with current capabilities. Design and efficient fabrication of high-reliability, low-cost, metal-based, mGC sensors are critical for establishing the technical and commercial feasibility of such devices. The project team combines extensive expertise on GC design, testing, and applications as well as microfabrication of metal-based high-aspect-ratio microscale structures (HARMS). Fabrication of metallic HARMS by molding replication, combined with efficient microscale bonding, promises low-cost, high-throughput, mGC device production with high reliability. The proposed methodology offers competitive advantages compared to silicon-based integrated-circuit processing techniques and represents a good opportunity for pushing metal-based mGC sensors to commercially-viable products.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is multifaceted and significant. Miniature GC sensor modules can be a device that promotes efficiency and improvements throughout industry and society. For example, better monitoring improves the quality of chemical products. On-site monitoring and processing of multi-point compositional information improves chemical plant efficiencies and the control of process upsets. Early detection of emissions from leaks prevents pollution, and helps industry meet clean air compliance requirements. Effective monitoring assures water quality and alleviates public health concerns. The availability of mGC sensors will eliminate many field sampling activities connected to laboratory analysis. Real-time monitoring lowers compliance cost of environmental regulations and fines, and accelerates the permit process. Increased security at airports and public facilities lessens public apprehension and reduce time delays. Detection of disease earlier and more cheaply improves health care. As such, significant market interest exists for the proposed technology. The proposed mGC sensors may enable many new and yet unrealized applications. This is where the mGC sensor modules will have it greatest potential for market expansion. By focusing on such market expansion opportunities, the presently proposed project combines technical innovation with commercial promise.

Loading Enervana Technologies LLC collaborators
Loading Enervana Technologies LLC collaborators