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Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2011.1.1.6-2 | Award Amount: 4.46M | Year: 2011

Now and in the foreseeable future, action on climate mitigation and adaptation doesnt seem to be sufficient to manage greenhouse gases and their impact at the scale required to achieve stringent objectives such as those compatible with the 2C target. This project aims at carrying out a rigorous assessment of what a stringent climate policy entails, and what is needed to overcome major impediments. This information will allow policymakers to better assess the costs and benefits of aggressive climate targets, and on how to make them implementable. Specifically, LIMITS will avail of the best methodological instruments to assess climate policies, whose analysis will interact with policy evaluation. Key global integrated assessment models will run climate mitigation and adaptation scenarios under new conditions and constraints, and the policy implications will be thoroughly evaluated. The needed physical changes in energy infrastructure and land use needed to comply to climate action will be assessed globally and regionally, for many of major world economies. In addition, the co-relationships of climate strategies with other pressing social and environmental issues, such as economic development, energy security and air pollution, will be analysed to identify a set of robust strategies that have the best chances of making stringent climate policy implementable.

Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-03b-2014 | Award Amount: 5.21M | Year: 2015

An important question for policy makers, in the G20 and beyond, is how to bring climate action into the broader sustainable development agenda. Objectives like energy poverty eradication, increased well-being and welfare, air quality improvement, energy security enhancement, and food and water availability will continue to remain important over the next several decades. There have been relatively few scientific analyses, however, that have explored the complex interplay between climate action and development while simultaneously taking both global and national perspectives. The CD-LINKS project will change this, filling this critical knowledge gap and providing much-needed information for designing complementary climate-development policies. CD-LINKS has four overarching goals: (i) to gain an improved understanding of the linkages between climate change policies (mitigation/adaptation) and multiple sustainable development objectives, (ii) to broaden the evidence base in the area of policy effectiveness by exploring past and current policy experiences, (iii) to develop the next generation of globally consistent, national low-carbon development pathways, and (iv) to establish a research network and capacity building platform in order to leverage knowledge-exchange among institutions from Europe and other key players within the G20. Through six highly integrated work packages from empirical research to model and scenario development CD-LINKS will advance the state-of-the-art of climate-development policy analysis and modelling in a number of areas. The project aims to have a pronounced impact on the policy dialogue, both nationally and internationally: an important outcome of the project will be a list of country-specific policy recommendations for effectively managing the long-term transformation process. These recommendations will point out opportunities for policy synergies and at the same time respect political and institutional barriers to implementation.

Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.1.6-3 | Award Amount: 4.26M | Year: 2011

Climate policy needs to aim at ambitious long-term climate stabilization. This will require managing the transition from carbon intensive to low carbon economies within this century. Research on mitigation pathways to a low carbon society and the associated mitigation costs is indispensable for informing policy makers. The project AMPERE is aiming for a broad exploration of mitigation pathways and associated mitigation costs under various real world limitations, while at the same time generating a better understanding about the differences across models, and the relation to historical trends. Uncertainties about the costs of mitigation originate from the entire causal chain ranging from economic activity, to emissions and related technologies, and the response of the carbon cycle and climate system to greenhouse gas emissions. AMPERE will use a sizable ensemble of state-of-the-art energy-economy and integrated assessment models to analyse mitigation pathways and associated mitigation costs in a series of multi-model intercomparisons. It will focus on four central areas: (i) The role of uncertainty about the climate response to anthropogenic forcing on the remaining carbon budget for supplying societies around the globe with energy, (ii) the role of technology availability, innovation and myopia in the energy sector, (iii) the role of policy imperfections like limited regional or sectoral participation in climate policy regimes, and (iv) the implications for decarbonisation scenarios and policies for Europe.

Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2007. | Award Amount: 4.61M | Year: 2008

There is increasing interest in the economics of climate change to inform policy on a) long-term targets, b) the costs of inaction (the economic effects of climate change), and c) the costs and benefits of adaptation. The objectives of this study are to advance knowledge across all three areas, i.e. the full economic costs of climate change, through the following tasks: 1. To identify and develop consistent climate change and socio-economic scenarios, including mitigation scenarios; 2. To quantify in physical terms, and economic costs, the costs of inaction for these scenarios, with bottom-up disaggregated (spatial) modelling for market and non-market sectors (coasts, health, ecosystems, energy, water, infrastructure) in the EU and other major negotiator countries (US, China, India). To extend analysis to quantify and value the costs and benefits of adaptation, and the residual costs of climate change after adaptation. 3. To asses the physical effects and economic damages of a number of the most important major catastrophic events and major socially contingent effects. 4. To update the mitigation costs of GHG emission reductions for medium and long-term reduction targets/ stabilisation goals. To include (induced) technological change, non CO2 GHG and sinks, and recent abatement technologies. 5. To quantify the ancillary air quality benefits of mitigation, using a spatially detailed dis-aggregated approach to quantify in physical terms and monetary benefits, in Europe and major negotiator countries. 6. To apply a number of complementary CGM and IAM models to incorporate the information from the tasks above. 7. To bring all the information above together to provide policy relevant output, including information on physical effects and economic values, and undertake analysis of policy scenarios. The project involves a multi-disciplinary team with leading impact and economic experts. It is innovative in developing bottom-up and top-down analysis within consistent scenarios and a single integrated framework, providing highly dis-aggregated outputs on impacts and economic costs.

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