Energetics Inc

Columbia, MD, United States

Energetics Inc

Columbia, MD, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Exposure to environments outside a comfortable temperature could help tackle major metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, and should be reflected in modern building practices, finds a study published today. This new research reveals how exposure to mildly cold or warm environments, outside the standard comfort zone inside buildings of 21 - 22 C, increases metabolism and energy expenditure which may help to tackle obesity. For those with type 2 diabetes, exposure to mild coldness influences glucose metabolism and after 10 days of intermittent cold, patients had increased insulin sensitivity by more than 40 percent. These results for diabetes treatment are comparable with the best pharmaceutical solutions available. As a result of the positive benefits, the authors advocate that living conditions in modern buildings, such as homes and offices, should be dynamic and incorporate drifting temperatures in order to support healthy human environments. Such measures should go hand in hand with the classical lifestyle factors such diet and physical exercise. The research, published in Building Research & Information, outlines how preventable metabolic syndrome health conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, may be influenced by exposure to a variable indoor temperature. "It has previously been assumed that stable fixed indoor temperatures would satisfy comfort and health in most people. However, this research indicates that mild cold and variable temperatures may have a positive effect on our health and at the same time are acceptable or even may create pleasure," said lead author of the study and Professor of Ecological Energetics and Health at Maastricht University Wouter van Marken Lichtenbelt. "This ground breaking research provides a new approach to how we think about the heating and cooling our of buildings. The health benefits from a short exposure to a more varied temperature range will redefine our expectations on thermal comfort. In turn, this will change our practices for heating and cooling our buildings," added Richard Lorch, editor in chief. The research, part of a forthcoming Building Research & Information special issue entitled "Rethinking Thermal Comfort" examines the practices of thermal comfort, and offers solutions providing healthier, comfortable, low-energy solutions in buildings. In developed countries, buildings account for up to 40 percent of energy demand and constitute a significant proportion of CO emissions. A reduction in heating and cooling of buildings will have a positive health effect on the occupants, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

By 2050, connected autonomous vehicles could reduce fuel consumption by as much as 44 percent for passenger vehicles and 18 percent for trucks, according to a new study released by the Energy Information Administration. However, those gains could be offset if autonomous vehicles make automobiles easier for everyone and and liberate shut-in populations, such as the elderly, disabled, and people too young to drive, the study says. By boosting the nation's total vehicle miles traveled, that scenario could slightly worsen fuel consumption. "The largest influencer in potential fuel reduction ... stems from vehicle and powertrain resizing," states the report, referring to a scenario in which people no longer need to purchase vehicles maximized for every potential use. Using a mobile phone, people could order a much smaller and lighter vehicle for a single-passenger office commute than the current situation, in which those same people might purchase a utility vehicle because it can manage an occasional hauling or camping trip. Unlike some earlier assessments, in this "Study of the Potential Energy Consumption Impacts of Connected and Automated Vehicles" the consultants weigh the impact of electrification and shared use. Autonomous vehicles enjoy a symbiosis with electric vehicles. They both employ wired, rather than mechanical, driving and braking controls. So manufacturers can eliminate the weight contributed by those mechanisms, producing more economical cars. In other ways, too, it will make more economic sense for people to share vehicles than to own their own. The average owned vehicle sits idle 95 percent of the time, depreciating. A shared vehicle earns its keep by taking on other passengers. Insurance is expected to cost much less, because an estimated 94 percent of accidents are caused by human error, and those who don't own would bear a sliver of insurance costs. The mobility-service companies that own the vehicles would have market incentives to reduce cost. "This shift in ownership model would signify an important shift in personal mobility priorities, from performance and style to lowering the cost per mile to attract more customers with lower rates," the report states. The report was conducted for EIA by the consulting firms Z, Inc. and Energetics Inc. and released in late March. The fuel savings are compared to a reference case—itself a projection of expected business-as-usual consumption. Like in-house EIA projections, the report surfs considerable uncertainty, especially beyond 2030. Speaking in Chicago this month, the recent director of the EIA pointed out that EIA projections are less important than the variance the agency detects between different scenarios. "How can you possibly have a forecast that's correct about 2050 or even 2040?" asked Adam Sieminski, who headed EIA from 2012 until January of this year. "The goal is to test how sensitive that endpoint is to changes in assumptions. The delta between scenarios is most interesting." The delta between scenarios is much wider for driverless cars in this study than for trucks, which already tend to be sized for their tasks and have less potential to merge underserved populations onto the roadway. Truck companies are expected to favor autonomous vehicles because they spare them driver costs, and when trucking companies platoon those robot trucks they will also enjoy fuel savings. "In one representative platooning test," the study says, "two semi-trucks trucks were platooned at a constant 64 mph at a 36-foot following distance. This configuration resulted in an average fuel consumption saving of 4.5% for the lead truck and 10% for the following truck." All classes of autonomous trucks are expected to enjoy fuel savings that range from marginal improvements to about 18 percent. Last year, Americans consumed 143.37 billion gallons of gasoline, according to EIA. By Jeff McMahon, based in Chicago. Follow Jeff McMahon on Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter, or email him here.


Members of the Laboratory of New Materials for Solar Energetics, working at the Faculty of Material Sciences, in cooperation with their colleagues from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have elaborated a new method. It allows to obtain highly crystalline organic-inorganic perovskite films for solar cells. The project results are published in the Materials Horizons. Scientists of the Lomonosov Moscow State University Press Service has already worked on nanowires of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites, which are treated as a promising substance for creation of light emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors on their basis. However, the most promising application area for such substances is elaboration of perovskite solar cells - namely, photovoltaic devices of new generation. Efficiency of these devices has risen by several times over the last five years and now comprises even more than 22%. This is significantly higher than maximum efficiency, obtained for solar cells on the basis of polycrystalline silicon. Efficiency of the most popular solar cells, produced industrially, is 12-15%. At the moment one could distinguish two main approaches to obtaining of such material. The first one implies coating with chemical agents from vaporous state and the second one -- solution crystallization. Projects, aimed at improving these methods, have been intensively developed in recent years. However, further perspectives of these approaches are almost exhausted. In this light elaboration of new techniques for creation of materials, used in photovoltaics, could give fresh impetus in the area development. Alexey Tarasov, Doctor of Chemistry, the Head of the Laboratory and the Study Lead shares: "As part of the study we've found out several new compounds -- polyiodides, which are liquid at room temperature, possessing unique properties. They look like viscous liquids of dark brown color with metal gleam, obtained from two solid powders, which simply melt while blending. Liquid state of such compounds allows not to use hazard solvents and, moreover, their chemical composition contributes to formation of a necessary perovskite upon contact with a metallic lead film or other lead compounds. As a result of the chemical interaction between a lead film and polyiodide melts, a perovskite film, comprised of large interpenetrating crystals, is formed. Polyiodide melts are deposited on lead by a so called spin coating technique. For this purpose a glass substrate, on which a lead layer is applied by thermal spraying, is fixed on a whirling rod and starts rotating. Polyiodide is spilled on the whirling glass substrate and afterwards polyiodide residue is flushed by a solvent (namely, isopropanol). As a result you get perovskite films from 200 to 700 nm in thickness. Their stability is determined, for the first place by the material, of which they consist. The members of the Faculty of Material Sciences have shown the possibility to diversify the composition of applied polyiodides and, consequently, the possibility to select a composition with optimal stability. Alexey Tarasov comments: "A perovskite film exhibit intense photoluminescence and large lifetimes of charge carriers that provides good functional properties. We've also revealed in our project the possibility to obtain perovskite films of various compositions, while using mixed polyiodide compounds. Researches, conducted by our laboratory in the area of perovskite photovoltaics, are funded in the framework of a Federal Target Program of the Russian Ministry of Education and Science together with the industrial partner - EuroSibEnergo Company." The Laboratory currently continues studying properties of discovered polyiodides and elaborating on their basis a technology, allowing to obtain solar cells with high efficiency. The research has been conducted in cooperation with scientists from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne.


Upon contact of two chemical agent powders at room temperature a viscous dark liquid is formed in a matter of seconds. This is methylammonium polyiodides. Credit: Alexey Tarasov Members of the Laboratory of New Materials for Solar Energetics, working at the Faculty of Material Sciences, in cooperation with their colleagues from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have obtained highly crystalline organic-inorganic perovskite films for solar cells. Their results are published in the journal Materials Horizons. The researchers previously worked on nanowires of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites, which are promising for the creation of light emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. However, the most promising application for these substances is the elaboration of perovskite solar cells—namely, next-generation photovoltaic devices. Efficiency of these devices has risen by several times over the last five years, and now comprises even more than 22 percent. This is significantly higher than the maximum efficiency of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Efficiency of the most popular industrially produced solar cells is 12 to 15 percent. There are two main approaches for obtaining this material. The first involves a coating of vaporous chemical agents, and the second is solution crystallization. Projects aimed at improving these methods have been intensively developed in recent years. However, further perspectives of these approaches are almost exhausted. Alexey Tarasov, Doctor of Chemistry, the Head of the Laboratory and the Study Lead says, "As part of the study, we've found several new compounds—polyiodides, which are liquid at room temperature, and have unique properties. They look like viscous liquids of dark brown color with a metal gleam, obtained from two solid powders, which simply melt while blending. Their liquid state makes them a good substitute for hazardous solvents and, their chemical composition contributes to the formation of a necessary perovskite upon contact with a metallic lead film or other lead compounds. As a result of the chemical interaction between lead film and polyiodide melts, a perovskite film composed of large interpenetrating crystals is formed." Polyiodide melts are deposited on lead using a so-called spin coating technique. For this purpose, a glass substrate with lead layer is fixed on a whirling rod and rotates. Polyiodide is poured on the whirling glass substrate and the residue is flushed using isopropanol. This produces stable perovskite films from 200 to 700 nm in thickness. The lab currently continues studying properties of discovered polyiodides and elaborating technologies to obtain solar cells with high efficiency. More information: Andrey A. Petrov et al, A new formation strategy of hybrid perovskites via room temperature reactive polyiodide melts, Mater. Horiz. (2017). DOI: 10.1039/C7MH00201G


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

After five successful years in business and multiple regional chapters spanning from coast to coast, What Women Want™ Networking will host their first National Lifestyles Networking Conference in Atlanta, October 7th – 8th, 2017, called Spirit of Women, featuring Women For One as a VIP Sponsor: http://www.SpiritOfWomenConference.com Spirit of Women will educate and empower attendees with a variety of educational and motivational speakers, interactive workshops and exciting panel discussions focusing on professional and personal development. Throughout the entire conference women will be encouraged to network and create valuable business connections as well as cultivate personal relationships with hundreds of enthusiastic participants from all across the country. Keynoting the event will be Dr. Robi Ludwig from NYC, a nationally known psychotherapist, award-winning reporter and bestselling author of "Your Best Age Is Now." Leading Presenters for the conference include Jennifer Longmore, founder of Soul Journeys from Canada, Kelly McNelis, founder of Women For One from Seattle and Monica Shah, founder of Revenue Breakthrough from NYC. The conference will open for registration at 7:30am on October 7th and continue until 7pm that evening, then begin again the second day at 9am and come to a close at 12:30pm with Business Energetics Expert Jennifer Longmore, who will hold a unique guided meditation aptly titled “Everything You Want.” The founder, Judy Goss, enthusiastically states “Ever since I opened What Women Want™ back in 2011 (formerly Over 40 Females) I’ve been wanting to host a national conference where women from all over the country can have the opportunity to come together and empower each other, with each other and for each other. Together we can make it happen! We are gathering a group of diverse, motivated women who want to 'Connect, Encourage and Inspire' which is our motto, and whose desire it is to grow, learn and feel supported in their personal lives as well as with their businesses or careers.” What Women Want™ was founded in January 2011 by Judy Goss, a TV personality/Radio Show Host, St. Martin’s Press Author, Speaker and Women's Advocate, to Connect, Encourage and Inspire women all over the world for the purpose of enhancing both their professional and personal lives. The first established chapter was in the fall of 2011 in Fairfield County, Connecticut, which is being run successfully for over five years by the founding director of What Women Want Fairfield County, Christine Oleynick. In addition to her hit radio show “What Women Want," http://www.whatwomenwantradio.com, which has garnered over 750,000 downloads since its inception three years ago, airing live weekly on LA Talk Radio, Judy is a regular contributor for FOX NY and NBC CT. In the press constantly because of Judy's background, who was also a magazine editor and news correspondent at MORE Magazine/Better TV, What Women Want™ has now become a force to be reckoned with in the women's networking industry. Judy created What Women Want™ to give women the resources necessary to start a business, connect with like-minded women, gain financial freedom, enhance their spirituality, improve health awareness learn about fashion, beauty and more through continual live and online networking events, guest speakers, personal online profiles of the members and more. There is a competitive Speakers Board and new chapters are constantly opening across the country. Not just another networking group, What Women Want™ has gotten its members press (both TV and editorials), valuable business partnerships, national speaking opportunities, education, hundreds of thousands of dollars in giveaways, lifelong friendships, increased personal confidence and more. What Women Want™ and their members and sponsors are routinely seen nationwide on outlets such as: NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX, Better TV, News 12, Huffington Post, Shape Magazine, Westport Magazine, Bella Magazine, Long Island Herald and countless other outlets, newspapers, radio shows and blogs around the country.


Patent
Energetics Inc | Date: 2012-12-06

Provided is weapon-mountable laser distractor having an enclosure (100) with a top surface and bottom surface connected to each other by two side surfaces, a from surface and a rear surface. The top surface includes an articulated mounting adapter (150), the bottom surface includes controls (201), the front surface includes an integral optic cover (110) and a plurality of apertures (120, 130, 140). The enclosure (100) protects and surrounds a laser device including a battery module (490) in communication with an electronic module (470). The electronic module (470) controls a plurality of light generating modules (400, 405,410) which provide light to a plurality of optic modules (420, 425, 430). A controls module (440) or remote module (460) provides instructions to the electronic module. A display module (480) and an indicator module (450) are also provided.


Patent
Energetics Inc | Date: 2016-02-10

An exploding target features a hard-walled container containing ammonium nitrate therein and a flexible bag containing particulate aluminum therein disposed in the container. An explosive mixture is formed by mixing the oxidizing and sensitizing components in the container according to one aspect of the invention. In another aspect of the invention, each pair of opposing upstanding container walls are in parallel relation thereto and have uniform spacing therebetween from the bottom to the top thereof so that the amount of explosive mixture contained between each pair of opposing walls along the depth therebetween is uniform across the surface area of each wall. In a further aspect, each wall has a visually distinguishable feature for distinguishing from the other walls and from the external environment. In a further aspect of the invention, the aluminum comprises a combination of fine and coarse grades of aluminum particles for improving sensitivity to bullet impact.


Patent
Energetics Inc | Date: 2012-12-03

Systems and methods presented herein provide for optical surveillance using modulated lasers, or other forms of light, and optical detection. In one embodiment, an optical surveillance system includes a light source, such as a laser or light emitting diode, and a signal generator operable to modulate the light source. The system also includes a detector operable to detect the modulated light source and a processor communicatively coupled to the detector to distinguish the modulated light source from other detected light based on the modulating waveform of the modulated light source. The processor is also operable to determine a presence of an object between the laser and the detector based on an obscuration of the laser pulses on the detector.


Patent
Energetics Inc | Date: 2012-11-19

A unique physical design of 532 nm Diode Pumped Solid State (DPSS) laser elements to achieve independent crystal phasing (rotation), spacing and output coupler (OC) alignment in a robust small package is provided.


Patent
Energetics Inc | Date: 2013-06-12

Systems and methods presented herein provide for laser detection and ranging in more than one medium. In one embodiment, a laser is operable to generate and fire laser pulses into a liquid, such as water. The laser pulses form broadband super continuum emissions and/or harmonics in the liquid that propagate optical energy past a surface of the liquid. A detector is operable to receive the optical energy from the liquid, which is then processed to determine a range parameter of the liquid. That is, a processor may determine the depth of the water or an object beneath the surface of the water by measuring the travel times of optical energy reflected from the surface of the liquid and optical energy returned from beneath the surface of the liquid.

Loading Energetics Inc collaborators
Loading Energetics Inc collaborators