Endoscopic Center

Shanghai, China

Endoscopic Center

Shanghai, China
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Jianqin S.,Fudan University | Leiming X.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Lu X.,Endoscopic Center | Yelland G.W.,Monash University | And 3 more authors.
Nutrition Journal | Year: 2016

Background: Cows' milk generally contains two types of β-casein, A1 and A2 types. Digestion of A1 type can yield the peptide β-casomorphin-7, which is implicated in adverse gastrointestinal effects of milk consumption, some of which resemble those in lactose intolerance. This study aimed to compare the effects of milk containing A1 β-casein with those of milk containing only A2 β-casein on inflammation, symptoms of post-dairy digestive discomfort (PD3), and cognitive processing in subjects with self-reported lactose intolerance. Methods: Forty-five Han Chinese subjects participated in this double-blind, randomized, 2 × 2 crossover trial and consumed milk containing both β-casein types or milk containing only A2 β-casein. Each treatment period was 14 days with a 14-day washout period at baseline and between treatment periods. Outcomes included PD3, gastrointestinal function (measured by smart pill), Subtle Cognitive Impairment Test (SCIT), serum/fecal laboratory biomarkers, and adverse events. Results: Compared with milk containing only A2 β-casein, the consumption of milk containing both β-casein types was associated with significantly greater PD3 symptoms; higher concentrations of inflammation-related biomarkers and β-casomorphin-7; longer gastrointestinal transit times and lower levels of short-chain fatty acids; and increased response time and error rate on the SCIT. Consumption of milk containing both β-casein types was associated with worsening of PD3 symptoms relative to baseline in lactose tolerant and lactose intolerant subjects. Consumption of milk containing only A2 β-casein did not aggravate PD3 symptoms relative to baseline (i.e., after washout of dairy products) in lactose tolerant and intolerant subjects. Conclusions: Consumption of milk containing A1 β-casein was associated with increased gastrointestinal inflammation, worsening of PD3 symptoms, delayed transit, and decreased cognitive processing speed and accuracy. Because elimination of A1 β-casein attenuated these effects, some symptoms of lactose intolerance may stem from inflammation it triggers, and can be avoided by consuming milk containing only the A2 type of beta casein. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT02406469 © 2016 Jianqin et al.


PubMed | Monash University, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Endoscopic Center, S.P.R.I.M. China Shanghai Consulting Co. and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Nutrition journal | Year: 2016

Cows milk generally contains two types of -casein, A1 and A2 types. Digestion of A1 type can yield the peptide -casomorphin-7, which is implicated in adverse gastrointestinal effects of milk consumption, some of which resemble those in lactose intolerance. This study aimed to compare the effects of milk containing A1 -casein with those of milk containing only A2 -casein on inflammation, symptoms of post-dairy digestive discomfort (PD3), and cognitive processing in subjects with self-reported lactose intolerance.Forty-five Han Chinese subjects participated in this double-blind, randomized, 2 2 crossover trial and consumed milk containing both -casein types or milk containing only A2 -casein. Each treatment period was 14 days with a 14-day washout period at baseline and between treatment periods. Outcomes included PD3, gastrointestinal function (measured by smart pill), Subtle Cognitive Impairment Test (SCIT), serum/fecal laboratory biomarkers, and adverse events.Compared with milk containing only A2 -casein, the consumption of milk containing both -casein types was associated with significantly greater PD3 symptoms; higher concentrations of inflammation-related biomarkers and -casomorphin-7; longer gastrointestinal transit times and lower levels of short-chain fatty acids; and increased response time and error rate on the SCIT. Consumption of milk containing both -casein types was associated with worsening of PD3 symptoms relative to baseline in lactose tolerant and lactose intolerant subjects. Consumption of milk containing only A2 -casein did not aggravate PD3 symptoms relative to baseline (i.e., after washout of dairy products) in lactose tolerant and intolerant subjects.Consumption of milk containing A1 -casein was associated with increased gastrointestinal inflammation, worsening of PD3 symptoms, delayed transit, and decreased cognitive processing speed and accuracy. Because elimination of A1 -casein attenuated these effects, some symptoms of lactose intolerance may stem from inflammation it triggers, and can be avoided by consuming milk containing only the A2 type of beta casein.ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT02406469.


Braunschmid T.,Medical University of Vienna | Stift A.,Medical University of Vienna | Mittlbock M.,Medical University of Vienna | Lord A.,University of Southampton | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Surgery | Year: 2015

Background: In the light of controversial data in the literature, the present study was designed to evaluate potential associations between colonic diverticular disease, constipation and quality of life. Design: We prospectively enrolled 976 consecutive patients, who participated in the nationwide colorectal cancer screening program in four medical centers between 2008 and 2009. All patients underwent full colonoscopy and completed a standardized questionnaire. The severity of constipation was assessed by the validated Wexner constipation score. Quality of Life (QOL) was evaluated by the SF-12 health score. Results: The median age was 62 years (range 22-90) and the male to female ratio was 1:1. Colonic diverticular disease was found in 290 participants (30%). Age, body mass index and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with the presence of diverticular disease (p<0.0001, p = 0.0007 and p = 0.0178).The median constipation score in patients with diverticular disease was 3 (range 0-18), and comparable to patients without diverticula (p=0.1073). The physical component summary of the SF-12 was significantly reduced in patients with diverticular disease (p = 0.0038). Conclusion: This large population based study revealed no association between colonic diverticular disease and constipation. Notably, the presence of diverticular disease significantly impacts quality of life. © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited.


Riss S.,Medical University of Vienna | Weiser F.A.,Endoscopic Center | Schwameis K.,Medical University of Vienna | Riss T.,Hartmannspital Wien | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Colorectal Disease | Year: 2012

Introduction Exact data on the prevalence of hemorrhoids are rare. Therefore, we designed a study to investigate the prevalence of hemorrhoids and associated risk factors in an adult general population. Methods: Between 2008 and 2009, consecutive patients were included in a prospective study. They attended the Austrian national wide health care program for colorectal cancer screening at four medical institutions. A flexible colonoscopy and detailed examination were conducted in all patients. Hemorrhoids were defined according to a standardized grading system. Independent variables included baseline characteristics, sociodemographic data, and health status. Potential risk factors were calculated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Of 976 participants, 380 patients (38.93%) suffered from hemorrhoids. In 277 patients (72.89%), hemorrhoids were classified as grade I, in 70 patients (18.42%) as grade II, in 31 patients (8.16%) as grade III, and in 2 patients (0.53%) as grade IV. One hundred seventy patients (44.74%) complained about symptoms associated with hemorrhoids, whereas 210 patients (55.26%) reported no symptoms. In the univariate and multivariate analysis, body mass index (BMI) had a significant effect on the occurrence of hemorrhoids with p=0.0391 and p=0.0282, respectively. Even when correcting for other potential risk factors, an increase in the BMI of one increased the risk of hemorrhoids by 3.5%. Conclusion: Hemorrhoids occur frequently in the adult general population. Notably, a considerable number of people with hemorrhoids do not complain about symptoms. In addition, a high BMI can be regarded as an independent risk factor for hemorrhoids. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Riss S.,Medical University of Vienna | Weiser F.A.,Endoscopic Center | Riss T.,Hartmannspital Wien | Schwameis K.,Medical University of Vienna | And 2 more authors.
Colorectal Disease | Year: 2011

Aim There are few studies into the quality of life of patients with haemorrhoids. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life of patients with haemorrhoids in an adult general population. Method Participants, who attended the Austrian nationwide healthcare programme for colorectal cancer screening at four medical institutions, were enrolled prospectively between 2008 and 2009. A colonoscopy was performed in all patients. Haemorrhoids were classified according to an international grading system and defined as symptomatic in cases with bleeding, itching, soiling or pain. Quality of life was measured by the Short Form-12 Health Survey. Results Of 976 participants, 380 patients (39%) had haemorrhoids. The median physical health score was 52.6 (range 20.6-61.3) in the symptomatic and 53.2 (range 16.2-61.3) in the asymptomatic group (P=0.7993). The median mental health score showed also no significant difference between both groups [symptomatic group, 52.8 (range 12.4-62.6); asymptomatic group, 54.8 (range 18.7-67.2); P=0.0738]. Conclusion Haemorrhoids, irrespective of their degree, do not influence quality of life measured by the Short Form-12 Health Survey. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

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