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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Published recently in European Endocrinology, the peer-reviewed journal from touchENDOCRINOLOGY, Jean Claude Mbanya, Juergen Sandow, Wolfgang Landgraf and David R Owens introduce biosynthetic human insulin and insulin analogues as the mainstay of insulin therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, access to human insulin at affordable prices remains a global issue. The world is experiencing an exponential rise in the prevalence of diabetes presenting an urgent need to establish effective diabetes therapy in countries burdened by inadequate health care budgets, malnutrition and infectious diseases. Recombinant human insulin has replaced animal insulins and animal-based semisynthetic human insulin thereby available in sufficient quantities and at affordable prices able to provide global access to insulin therapy. In many patients, analog insulins can offer additional clinical benefit, although at a considerably higher price thus severely restricting availability in low income countries. The approval process for recombinant human insulins (i.e. biosimilars) and analogue insulins is highly variable in the developing countries in contrast to Europe and in North America, where it is well established within a strict regulatory framework. This review aims to discuss the future access to human insulin therapy in a global context with an ever increasing burden of diabetes and significant economic implications. The full peer-reviewed, open-access article is available here: Disclosure: Jean Claude Mbanya is member of the Sanofi AMESA Diabetes Advisory Board. Juergen Sandow is a consultant to Sanofi Paris and Academic Research Associate. Wolfgang Landgraf is an employee of Sanofi-Aventis Germany. David Owens has received honoraria from Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Sanofi and Takeda for lectures and/or advisory boards. touchENDOCRINOLOGY (a division of Touch Medical Media) publishes European Endocrinology, a peer-reviewed, open access, bi-annual journal specialising in the publication of balanced and comprehensive review articles written by leading authorities to address the most important and salient developments in the field of endocrinology. The aim of these reviews is to break down the high science from 'data-rich' primary papers and provide practical advice and opinion on how this information can help physicians in the day to day clinical setting. Practice guidelines, symposium write-ups, case reports, and original research articles are also featured to promote discussion and learning amongst physicians, clinicians, researchers and related healthcare professionals. Providing practical opinion to support best practice for busy healthcare professionals.


Published recently in European Endocrinology, the peer-reviewed journal from touchENDOCRINOLOGY, Stephen C Bain presents a review of the Cellnovo insulin delivery system. Autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta-cells results in absolute insulin deficiency, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Insulin therapy is required for people with T1DM to achieve an optimal glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c or A1c) along with controlled dayto- day blood glucose (BG) levels. While a variety of insulin delivery systems are available, factors such as the complexity of dosage calculation based on activity, diet and BG, the effectiveness of insulin delivery, ease of product use and 'human' issues, may affect concordance with treatment (see Table 1).[1],[2] Using an insulin delivery system which suits the patient's lifestyle and addresses issues of delivery reliability may improve concordance and ameliorate BG variability. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy has been shown to: • ensure accurate insulin delivery leading to improved A1c;[3] • eliminate the unpredicatable effects of intermediate or long-acting insulin;[3] • reduce severe low BG episodes; and[3] • facilitate easier delivery of bolus insulin.[3] The full peer-reviewed, open-access article is available here: Disclosure: Stephen C Bain is a member of the Cellnovo Medical Advisory Board. This article is a short opinion piece and has not been submitted to external peer reviewers, but the questions were reviewed by the Editorial Board before publication. European Endocrinology, a peer-reviewed, open access, bi-annual journal  specialising in the publication of balanced and comprehensive review articles written by leading authorities to address the most important and salient developments in the field of endocrinology. The aim of these reviews is to break down the high science from 'data-rich' primary papers and provide practical advice and opinion on how this information can help physicians in the day to day clinical setting. Practice guidelines, symposium write-ups, case reports, and original research articles are also featured to promote discussion and learning amongst physicians, clinicians, researchers and related healthcare professionals. Providing practical opinion to support best practice for busy healthcare professionals. [1] Skovlund SE, Peyrot M, The Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Program: A new approach to improving outcomes in diabetes care, Diabetes Spectrum, 2005;18(3):136-42.  [2] Nicolucci A, Kovacs Burns K, Holt RIG, et al., Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN 2): Cross-national benchmarking of diabetes-related psychosocial outcomes for people with diabetes, Diabetic Medicine, 2013;30(7):767-77. [3] American Diabetes Association, Advantages of Using an Insulin Pump, 2015. Available at: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/medication/insulin/advantages-of-using-an-insulin-pump.html  (accessed 3 October 2016).


InfoGlobalData Released Updated Mailing List of Endocrinology Physicians for a Successful Marketing Campaign Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with the endocrine system, its diseases and its specific secretions called endocrine glands and hormones. With the Endocrinologists Mailing Addresses List though you cannot improve the numbers, but can at least offers them the best medical supplies and pharmaceuticals needed for rendering services. Seattle, WA, May 12, 2017 --( InfoGlobalData Endocrinology Physicians Email Marketing List therefore will ensure that it aligns marketing strategies and campaigns, and through online and offline campaigns is able to give medical supplies and pharmaceuticals the exposure it deserves. The data at InfoGlobalData is permission based and perfect for marketing products or services. Reach prospects that are eager to buy products and services through InfoGlobalData. 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So make haste and get the Endocrinology Specialists Mailing Lists today! Endocrinology Physicians Email Database are updated on regular basis to ensure the highest accuracy level and tested before the final delivery of Endocrinology Physicians Mailing Lists. About InfoGlobalData: InfoGlobalData offers a highly targeted Opt-in Emails and Mails that helps clients to maximize ROI and improve conversions. They provide organizations of all types and sizes with access to the specialized service and databases necessary to clean, validate, correct and enhance marketing contact lists. InfoGlobalData employs expert data specialists that use the latest technology, daily-updated data, and optimized algorithms to provide qualified data outputs for clients. Their data is updated on an ongoing basis and comes from a variety of trusted sources. InfoGlobalData 113 Cherry St #32134 Seattle, WA 98104-2818 USA Email: sales@infoglobaldata.com Contact: +1 (206) 792 3760 Website: http://www.infoglobaldata.com/ Seattle, WA, May 12, 2017 --( PR.com )-- InfoGlobalData has launched Endocrinology Physicians Mailing Database with all Valid and Verified Lists. Endocrinology Physicians Email Addresses List offers access to one of the most reliable databases in the market with all the key information of prospects from this industry.InfoGlobalData Endocrinology Physicians Email Marketing List therefore will ensure that it aligns marketing strategies and campaigns, and through online and offline campaigns is able to give medical supplies and pharmaceuticals the exposure it deserves. The data at InfoGlobalData is permission based and perfect for marketing products or services. Reach prospects that are eager to buy products and services through InfoGlobalData. 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Get customized Endocrinology Physicians Email Marketing List based on the marketing campaign, one can select multi-channel b2b marketing campaigning to go viral and to expand market presence.Also, Reach Endocrinology Professionals within industries such as,· Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Physician Email List· Pediatric Endocrinology Physicians Mailing List· Endocrinology Physicians Direct Mailing List· Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Physician Email List· Endocrinology Physicians Email Addresses· Marketing Lists of Endocrine Doctors· Endocrinology Physicians by Specialty Email List· Endocrinology Users Email List· Endocrinology Physicians Directory List· American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Mailing List· Endocrinology Clinics in US Email List· Endocrinology - Consultants Directory List· Endocrinology Hospitals in US Mailing List· Endocrinology Physicians Email Marketing List· Endocrinology Physicians and Health Care Professional Email List· And MoreWith data that improves campaigning efficiency, InfoGlobalData Endocrinology Physicians Email Addresses are a must! 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Their data is updated on an ongoing basis and comes from a variety of trusted sources.InfoGlobalData113 Cherry St #32134Seattle, WA 98104-2818USAEmail: sales@infoglobaldata.comContact: +1 (206) 792 3760Website: http://www.infoglobaldata.com/ Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from InfoGlobalData


Published recently in European Endocrinology, the peer-reviewed journal from touchENDOCRINOLOGY, Stephen C Bain presents a review of the Cellnovo insulin delivery system. Autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta-cells results in absolute insulin deficiency, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Insulin therapy is required for people with T1DM to achieve an optimal glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c or A1c) along with controlled dayto- day blood glucose (BG) levels. While a variety of insulin delivery systems are available, factors such as the complexity of dosage calculation based on activity, diet and BG, the effectiveness of insulin delivery, ease of product use and 'human' issues, may affect concordance with treatment (see Table 1).[1],[2] Using an insulin delivery system which suits the patient's lifestyle and addresses issues of delivery reliability may improve concordance and ameliorate BG variability. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy has been shown to: • ensure accurate insulin delivery leading to improved A1c;[3] • eliminate the unpredicatable effects of intermediate or long-acting insulin;[3] • reduce severe low BG episodes; and[3] • facilitate easier delivery of bolus insulin.[3] The full peer-reviewed, open-access article is available here: Disclosure: Stephen C Bain is a member of the Cellnovo Medical Advisory Board. This article is a short opinion piece and has not been submitted to external peer reviewers, but the questions were reviewed by the Editorial Board before publication. European Endocrinology, a peer-reviewed, open access, bi-annual journal  specialising in the publication of balanced and comprehensive review articles written by leading authorities to address the most important and salient developments in the field of endocrinology. The aim of these reviews is to break down the high science from 'data-rich' primary papers and provide practical advice and opinion on how this information can help physicians in the day to day clinical setting. Practice guidelines, symposium write-ups, case reports, and original research articles are also featured to promote discussion and learning amongst physicians, clinicians, researchers and related healthcare professionals. Providing practical opinion to support best practice for busy healthcare professionals. [1] Skovlund SE, Peyrot M, The Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Program: A new approach to improving outcomes in diabetes care, Diabetes Spectrum, 2005;18(3):136-42.  [2] Nicolucci A, Kovacs Burns K, Holt RIG, et al., Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN 2): Cross-national benchmarking of diabetes-related psychosocial outcomes for people with diabetes, Diabetic Medicine, 2013;30(7):767-77. [3] American Diabetes Association, Advantages of Using an Insulin Pump, 2015. Available at: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/medication/insulin/advantages-of-using-an-insulin-pump.html  (accessed 3 October 2016).


Published recently in European Endocrinology, the peer-reviewed journal from touchENDOCRINOLOGY, Jean Claude Mbanya, Juergen Sandow, Wolfgang Landgraf and David R Owens introduce biosynthetic human insulin and insulin analogues as the mainstay of insulin therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, access to human insulin at affordable prices remains a global issue. The world is experiencing an exponential rise in the prevalence of diabetes presenting an urgent need to establish effective diabetes therapy in countries burdened by inadequate health care budgets, malnutrition and infectious diseases. Recombinant human insulin has replaced animal insulins and animal-based semisynthetic human insulin thereby available in sufficient quantities and at affordable prices able to provide global access to insulin therapy. In many patients, analog insulins can offer additional clinical benefit, although at a considerably higher price thus severely restricting availability in low income countries. The approval process for recombinant human insulins (i.e. biosimilars) and analogue insulins is highly variable in the developing countries in contrast to Europe and in North America, where it is well established within a strict regulatory framework. This review aims to discuss the future access to human insulin therapy in a global context with an ever increasing burden of diabetes and significant economic implications. The full peer-reviewed, open-access article is available here: Disclosure: Jean Claude Mbanya is member of the Sanofi AMESA Diabetes Advisory Board. Juergen Sandow is a consultant to Sanofi Paris and Academic Research Associate. Wolfgang Landgraf is an employee of Sanofi-Aventis Germany. David Owens has received honoraria from Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Sanofi and Takeda for lectures and/or advisory boards. touchENDOCRINOLOGY (a division of Touch Medical Media) publishes European Endocrinology, a peer-reviewed, open access, bi-annual journal specialising in the publication of balanced and comprehensive review articles written by leading authorities to address the most important and salient developments in the field of endocrinology. The aim of these reviews is to break down the high science from 'data-rich' primary papers and provide practical advice and opinion on how this information can help physicians in the day to day clinical setting. Practice guidelines, symposium write-ups, case reports, and original research articles are also featured to promote discussion and learning amongst physicians, clinicians, researchers and related healthcare professionals. Providing practical opinion to support best practice for busy healthcare professionals.


Baltimore, Md. - May 5, 2017. New research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) has found that secondhand smoke tends to have somewhat different effects on men and women. The research, conducted in a Pennsylvania Amish community where virtually no women smoke, found that women who were exposed to secondhand smoke had a greater risk for cardiovascular disease, while men exposed to secondhand smoke tended to have a higher body mass index (BMI). The authors of the study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, say previous research on the effects of secondhand smoke, and smoking in general, have been difficult to interpret due to variables in the socioeconomic status and educational level of participants. To reduce these variables, the researchers studied members of the old order Amish (OOA), a community in Lancaster County, Pa. UM SOM research teams have conducted research in this community since 1995 through the UM SOM's Amish Research Program. "The way the Amish live makes them uniquely suited for this kind of study," says lead investigator Robert M. Reed, MD, UM SOM associate professor of medicine and a pulmonary and critical care specialist at the University of Maryland Medical Center. "They live a lifestyle now that's very similar to the lifestyle their ancestors lived many generations ago. They have a lot of physical activity, don't drive, and the different Amish families live more similar lifestyles than do non-Amish populations." Also unique, cigars and pipes represent the predominant forms of tobacco smoked by the Amish. Reed says these smoking products produce more noxious secondhand smoke than cigarettes. Smoking in the group as a whole is fairly modest - 34 percent of men in the study said they had ever smoked. Just two women in the group reported ever smoking. The researchers employed a novel method to track exposure to secondhand smoke. "We first asked people their own personal smoking habits, and then, because we know exactly how all the Amish are related to each other, we were able to look at the family tree and extrapolate who had been exposed," explains Reed. "We knew if Mr. X says he smoked, we can extrapolate from that that his family was exposed." According to Reed, this approach has never been taken before in studies of smoking and it avoids a problem that can affect this type of research, called recall bias. "Sometimes people with poor health are more inclined to think harder about past exposures, which lead to misleading results. Our study avoids that possibility," Reed says. The researchers examined cross-sectional data on 3,568 Amish who participated in three community surveys of cardiovascular health between 2001 and 2015. Data included tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure from family members included in the study. Additionally, the researchers took blood samples, measured lung function and assessed vascular health. Smoking, which was limited to just men, was associated with lower lung function, higher BMI, lower HDL cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol), higher heart rate and poorer vascular health. The impact of secondhand smoke exposure was more intense in people with more smokers in their families, including spouses, parents and siblings. Secondhand smoke was associated with higher BMI and with higher fasting glucose in men, suggesting a diabetes risk, but not in women. Reduced HDL cholesterol was seen only in women exposed to secondhand smoke; in men only, secondhand smoke was associated with a lower heart rate. "The study confirms that even a small amount of secondhand smoke is harmful; it confirms prior findings and extends them by adding to the degree of certainty we have in the harmful associations we are seeing," says Reed. He adds that the findings suggest the possibility of a significant role for mechanisms less clearly established in secondhand smoking, but recognized in association with active smoking, such as HDL and BMI. "The real strength of this study is that this is a big population with very low exposure, yet we see very striking results for direct exposure," says the study's senior author, Braxton D. Mitchell, PhD, MPH, professor of medicine, epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and vice chair for research in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Nutrition in the Department of Medicine. "I would not have expected to see such dramatic effects with these low exposures." E. Albert Reece, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., vice president of medical affairs at the University of Maryland and dean of the School of Medicine, says, "This study suggests new avenues of research to understand more about the underlying mechanisms behind secondhand smoke. The fact that small amounts of exposure caused significant impact among Amish non-smokers, a population in which smoking is already at low levels, should be of concern to populations where smoking is much more prevalent." Tobacco smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States, responsible for an estimated 480,320 deaths annually, including 41,280 deaths attributable to lung cancer and coronary heart disease related to secondhand smoke exposure, according to a 2014 report from the Office of the Surgeon General. Reed RM, Dransfield MT, Eberlein M, Miller M, Netzer G, Pavlovich M, Pollin TI, Scharf SM, Shuldiner AR, Sin D, Mitchell BD. "Gender differences in first and secondhand smoke exposure, spirometric lung function and cardiometabolic health in the old order Amish: A novel population without female smoking." PLoS ONE. 12(3): e0174354 March 31, 2017. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0174354 Commemorating its 210th Anniversary, the University of Maryland School of Medicine was chartered in 1807 and is the first public medical school in the United States. It continues today as an innovative leader in accelerating innovation and discovery in medicine. The School of Medicine is the founding school of the University of Maryland and is an integral part of the 11-campus University System of Maryland. Located on the University of Maryland's Baltimore campus, the School of Medicine works closely with the University of Maryland Medical Center and Medical System to provide a research-intensive, academic and clinically based education. With 43 academic departments, centers and institutes and a faculty of more than 3,000 physicians and research scientists plus more than $400 million in extramural funding, the School is regarded as one of the leading biomedical research institutions in the U.S. with top-tier faculty and programs in cancer, brain science, surgery and transplantation, trauma and emergency medicine, vaccine development and human genomics, among other centers of excellence. The School is not only concerned with the health of the citizens of Maryland and the nation, but also has a global presence, with research and treatment facilities in more than 35 countries around the world. http://medschool. . The University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) is comprised of two hospitals in Baltimore: an 800-bed teaching hospital - the flagship institution of the 12-hospital University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS) - and a 200-bed community teaching hospital, UMMC Midtown Campus. UMMC is a national and regional referral center for trauma, cancer care, neurocare, cardiac care, diabetes and endocrinology, women's and children's health, and has one of the largest solid organ transplant programs in the country. All physicians on staff at the flagship hospital are faculty physicians of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. At UMMC Midtown Campus, faculty physicians work alongside community physicians to provide patients with the highest quality care. UMMC Midtown Campus was founded in 1881 and is located one mile away from the University Campus hospital. For more information, visit http://www. .


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DALLAS - May 9, 2017 - UT Southwestern research investigating the blood glucose-regulatory actions of the hormone ghrelin may have implications for development of new treatments for diabetes. Blood glucose is tightly regulated by the opposing actions of the hormones insulin and glucagon. Earlier studies led by Dr. Roger Unger, Professor of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center, demonstrated that experimentally deleting or neutralizing receptors for glucagon can prevent or correct dangerously high blood glucose levels in different models of diabetes. "Dr. Unger's research suggested that high or unopposed glucagon action that results from insulin deficiency is the main culprit in the development of high blood glucose - known as hyperglycemia - in diabetes," said Dr. Jeffrey Zigman, Professor of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study, published online today in the journal Diabetes. "He proposed that blocking or neutralizing glucagon action may serve as a new treatment for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. This idea formed the basis of our current study," Dr. Zigman added. Like glucagon and insulin, ghrelin also plays an important role in blood glucose control. But because the hormone was only discovered in the 1990s, ghrelin's actions on blood glucose haven't been studied as much as those of glucagon and insulin. The UTSW research team wanted to learn more about the role of ghrelin in diabetes. "We studied mice that lacks glucagon receptors. When we tried to make these animals diabetic by giving them an agent that destroys insulin-producing cells, the mice did not develop diabetes. Their blood sugar was normal. In addition to these results, we found that their ghrelin levels were high," said Dr. Zigman, who holds the Kent and Jodi Foster Distinguished Chair in Endocrinology, in Honor of Daniel Foster, M.D., the Mr. and Mrs. Bruce G. Brookshire Professorship in Medicine, and The Diana and Richard C. Strauss Professorship in Biomedical Research. In a related set of studies, when the researchers blocked the action of the elevated ghrelin, doing so caused the animals' blood sugar levels to drop below normal, he added. "These findings suggest that when glucagon activity is blocked, circulating levels of ghrelin rise, which helps to prevent dangerously low blood sugars from developing, a condition known as hypoglycemia," Dr. Zigman said. Pharmaceutical companies are now developing drugs targeting glucagon receptors to treat diabetes, including antibodies that will neutralize glucagon receptors or drugs that will block glucagon receptors, he added. "The body's normal ghrelin response should protect diabetic individuals being treated with agents that target glucagon receptors from experiencing hypoglycemia," Dr. Zigman said. Since the current study focused on a Type 1 diabetes model, researchers next plan to examine the coordinated actions of the ghrelin and glucagon systems in a Type 2 diabetes model. They also want to study the impact of ghrelin on hypoglycemia. "A potential side effect with any treatment that lowers blood sugar is that hypoglycemia may develop," Dr. Zigman said. "We would like to determine whether the administration of ghrelin or a compound that mimics the action of ghrelin could help correct that hypoglycemia." Lead author of the study is Dr. Bharath Mani, Instructor of Internal Medicine, and the co-senior authors include Dr. Unger, who holds the Touchstone/West Distinguished Chair in Diabetes Research, and Dr. Eric Berglund, Assistant Professor in the Advanced Imaging Research Center and of Pharmacology. Other contributing UTSW researchers are Dr. Aki Uchida, postdoctoral research fellow; Dr. Young Lee, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine; and Sherri Osborne-Lawrence, senior research scientist. The study received support from the National Institutes of Health, the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, and the Hilda & Preston Davis Foundation. UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has received six Nobel Prizes, and includes 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. The faculty of more than 2,700 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in about 80 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients, 600,000 emergency room cases, and oversee approximately 2.2 million outpatient visits a year. This news release is available on our website at http://www. . To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via email, subscribe at http://www. .


News Article | May 6, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

AUSTIN, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Howard M. Lando, MD, FACP, FACE was elected Treasurer today of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) at its 26th Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress in Austin, Texas. “AACE is a dynamic organization with far-reaching activities, and I am honored to serve with my fellow officers to contribute to the financial well-being of AACE,” said Dr. Lando. As Treasurer, he will serve on the Association’s Executive Committee and Board of Directors. Also, he will serve on committees and task forces as appointed by the AACE president. Dr. Lando is a practicing endocrinologist with Medical Specialists of Northern Virginia in Alexandria and Reston. He received his medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia (V.C.U.) in Richmond. His internship and residency were completed at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, and his fellowship was completed at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C., where he is a Clinical Professor of Medicine. Dr. Lando is a past president of Inova Mt. Vernon Hospital medical staff and has served on its executive committee since 1995. In addition, Dr. Lando is a past president of the D.C. affiliate of the American Diabetes Association. Dr. Lando joined AACE in 1991, and has served AACE as the chair of the Legislative and Regulatory Committee; and as a member of the Bylaws, Socioeconomics and Advocacy, Legislative and Regulatory and Underserved Populations and ACE FACE Applications committees. He has served on numerous AACE task forces, including ECNU, Sunshine Act and, most recently, as a participant and writer for the organization’s Glucose Monitoring Conference. About the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) represents more than 7,500 endocrinologists in the United States and abroad. AACE is the largest association of clinical endocrinologists in the world. The majority of AACE members are certified in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and concentrate on the treatment of patients with endocrine and metabolic disorders including diabetes, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, growth hormone deficiency, cholesterol disorders, hypertension and obesity. Visit our site at www.aace.com. About the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) The American College of Endocrinology (ACE) is the educational and scientific arm of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). ACE is the leader in advancing the care and prevention of endocrine and metabolic disorders by: providing professional education and reliable public health information; recognizing excellence in education, research and service; promoting clinical research and defining the future of Clinical Endocrinology. For more information, please visit www.aace.com/college.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A newly discovered molecule increases appetite during fasting -- and decreases it during gorging. The neuron-exciting protein, named NPGL - apparently aims to maintain body mass at a constant, come feast or famine. An evolutionary masterstroke, but not great news for those looking to trim down -- or beef up for the summer. Over recent decades, our understanding of hunger has greatly increased, but this new discovery turns things on their head. Up until now, scientists knew that leptin -- a hormone released by fatty tissue, reduces appetite, while ghrelin -- a hormone released by stomach tissue makes us want to eat more. These hormones, in turn, activate a host of neurons in the brain's hypothalamus -- the body's energy control center. The discovery of NPGL by Professor Kazuyoshi Ukena of Hiroshima University shows that hunger and energy consumption mechanisms are even more complex than we realized -- and that NPGL plays a central role in what were thought to be well-understood processes. Professor Ukena first discovered NPGL in chickens after noticing that growing birds grew larger irrespective of diet -- suggesting there was more to energy metabolism than meets the eye. Intrigued, the researchers at HU performed a DNA database search to see if mammals might also possess this elusive substance. They found that it exists in all vertebrates - including humans. In order to investigate its role, if any, in mammals, Professor Ukena's team fed three groups of mice, on three distinct diets, to see how NPGL levels are altered. The first set of mice was fed on a low-calorie diet for 24 hours. The second group was fed on a high-fat diet for 5 weeks -- and the third lucky group was fed on a high-fat diet, but for an extended period of 13 weeks. The mice fed on a low calorie diet were found to experience an extreme increase in NPGL expression, while the 5-week high-fat-diet group saw a large decrease in NPGL expression. Further analysis found that mice possess NPGL, and its associated neuron network, in the exact same locations of the brain as those regions already known to control appetite suppression and energy use. Professor Ukena proposes that NPGL plays a vital role in these mechanisms -- increasing appetite when energy levels fall and reducing appetite when an energy overload is detected -- together, helping to keep us at a healthy and functioning weight, and more importantly alive! As NPGL levels greatly increased in mice exposed to a low calorie diet, Professor Ukena believes it is an appetite promoter, working in opposition to appetite suppressing hormones such as leptin. Backing this hypothesis up, it was found that mice directly injected with NPGL exhibited a voracious appetite. Interestingly NPGL levels, which plummeted in the 5-week-long high-fat-diet mice - fell back to normal levels in mice who gorged themselves for the longer period of 13 weeks. It is proposed that exposure to high-fat diets for long periods of time lead to insensitivity to leptin's appetite-suppressing effects, and so NPGL -- even at normal levels - leads to weight gain and obesity, showing that the body can only do so much to keep our weight in check. Professor Ukena says that further study is required to understand the interaction of previously known appetite mechanisms with this new kid on the homeostasis block. It does seem however, that we still have a lot to learn about appetite, hunger, and energy consumption. It is hoped that this study into mammalian NPGL adds another piece to the puzzle. What is certain -- but you knew this already - is that dieting is difficult. The discovery and study of mammalian NPGL helps explain why, and provides a plausible excuse for those whose good intentions fall short. The findings were published in Endocrinology.


Shari M. Ling, MD has been selected to receive the first-ever Public Service Award from NKF, established to honor those who have dedicated their careers to public service and who have helped to shape public policies or government programs that improve outcomes for kidney patients.  Dr. Ling currently serves as the Deputy Chief Medical Officer for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and Medical Officer in the Center for Clinical Standards and Quality (CCSQ).  In her role at CMS, she assists the CMS Chief Medical Officer in the agency's pursuit of better health care, healthier populations and smarter spending. Dr. Ling's committed focus is on the achievement of meaningful health outcomes for patients and families through the delivery of high quality, person-centered care, across all care settings. Her clinical focus and scientific interest is in the care of persons with dementia, multiple chronic conditions and functional limitations. Derek Forfang, a kidney patient and long-time kidney disease advocate, has been selected to receive the first-ever Celeste Castillo Lee Patient Engagement Award, established in honor of Celeste Castillo Lee, a longtime advocate for patient-centered care and empowerment. It is the highest honor given by NKF to a distinguished kidney patient who exemplifies NKF's mission and Celeste's legacy of putting patients at the center of all aspects of healthcare through their involvement with NKF and community partners.  Mr. Forfang, of San Pablo, California, has been an end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient since 1999.  He received a kidney transplant and has also been on peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis.  A regional leader of NKF's Kidney Advocacy Committee and a member of the Public Policy Committee, Derek has worked tirelessly to protect and improve care for the kidney community. Merck been selected to receive the 2017 Corporate Innovator Award which recognizes industry partners that advance the field of nephrology by addressing an unmet medical need, or improving upon an existing practice, therapeutic or technology.  Merck's innovative new treatment for hepatitis C, ZEPATIER, is the only direct anti-viral agent specifically tested and approved for use in patients with chronic kidney disease stages four and five. Paul Palevsky, MD has been selected to receive the Dr. J. Michael Lazarus Distinguished Award established to honor Dr. Lazarus for his major contributions to the clinical science and care of dialysis patients, and to recognize individuals whose research has yielded novel insights related to renal replacement therapy.  Dr. Palevsky is Professor of Medicine and Clinical and Translational Science in the Renal-Electrolyte Division at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; and serves as Chief of the Renal Section at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System.  Dr. Palevsky's research has primarily focused on acute kidney injury and critical care nephrology. He will be presenting the Lazarus lecture on "We Don't Have to Fail at Acute Renal Failure: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Quality Improvement" on Friday, April 21st at 8:45 a.m. at the NKF Spring Clinical Meetings. Susanne Nicholas, MD, MPH, PhD has been selected to receive the Medical Advisory Board Distinguished Service Award established to recognize an individual for their educational activities and community service in promoting the mission of NKF on a local level.  Dr. Nicholas is a tenured Associate Professor of Medicine at UCLA in the Division of Nephrology where she maintains her clinical responsibilities, and the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, where she conducts research.  She is also a Clinical Hypertension Specialist.   Dr. Nicholas' research interests include understanding and identifying key factors that promote the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease (DKD); uncovering and validating novel biomarkers that may predict DKD progression; and quantifying renal structural changes associated with DKD in response to novel therapeutics, using stereology principles. Her research over the past 15 years has led to the identification of a novel biomarker of DKD, which is currently being validated in clinical studies. Katherine R. Tuttle, MD, FASN, FACP, FNKF, has been selected to receive the prestigious Garabed Eknoyan Award, created to recognize an individual who has promoted the mission of NKF in Making Lives Better for people with kidney disease through the exceptional contributions to key initiatives of NKF such as the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) or clinical research in the field of kidney disease.  Dr. Tuttle is the Executive Director for Research at Providence Health Care in Spokane, and serves as Co-Principal Investigator of the Institute of Translational Health Sciences, Investigator at Kidney Research Institute, and Clinical Professor of Medicine for the University of Washington.  Dr. Tuttle's major research interests include diabetic kidney disease, hypertension, renal vascular disease, nutrition in chronic kidney disease, and transitional care.  She has chaired numerous workgroups focused on diabetes and kidney disease including NKF's KDOQI Workgroup for Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease. Jonathan Himmelfarb, MD has been selected to receive the Donald W. Seldin Award, established to recognize excellence in clinical nephrology in the tradition of one of the foremost teachers and researchers in the field, Dr. Donald W. Seldin.  Dr. Himmelfarb is a Professor of Medicine, Director of the Kidney Research Institute, and holds the Joseph W. Eschbach, M.D. Endowed Chair in Kidney Research at the University of Washington School of Medicine.   He is the author of more than 200 peer-reviewed publications, has served on numerous grant review committees and scientific advisory boards and has held leadership positions in many national and international nephrology societies.  Dr. Himmelfarb has served on expert panels for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Veterans Health Administration, and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. He is also a nephrologist who cares for patients with kidney disease, and an internationally recognized educator about kidney disease. Raymond R. Townsend, MD has been selected to receive the Shaul G. Massry Distinguished Lecture Award, established to honor Dr. Massry for his scientific achievements and contribution to the kidney health care community and to NKF.  Dr. Townsend is Professor of Medicine and an Associate Director of the Center for Human Phenomic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.  He is currently a Principal Investigator evaluating the role of demographic, phenotypic, humoral and genetic factors in the progression of kidney disease and the development and progression of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease.  He was also the Principal Investigator of a multicenter effort evaluating the specific role of pulse wave velocity in the renal and cardiovascular consequences of chronic kidney disease.   Dr. Townsend led the work group that wrote the KDOQI Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Guideline on this subject, and most recently co-chaired the NKF workshop on Potassium Homeostasis in Disease and Health, the report on which will soon be published in the American Journal of Kidney Disease and Journal of the American Society of Hypertension. Tilakavati Karupaiah, PhD, APD, AN has been selected to receive the Joel D. Kopple Award, an annual award honoring an individual who has made significant contributions to the field of renal nutrition.  Dr. Karupaiah is an Accredited Practicing Dietitian with Dietitian's Association of Australia, a Professor and Head of the Dietetics Program at the National University of Malaysia; and also Adjunct Associate Professor at Wayne State University, Detroit.    Dr. Karupaiah's involvement in renal nutrition began because of a lack of dietitians in this field in Malaysia, and dialysis patients needed patient-friendly information about local diets. At the National University of Malaysia, she encouraged early exposure of dietetic students to renal patient care through community engagement, outpatient counseling and practical skills on patient diet planning. Dr. Karupaiah is now targeting capacity building mentorship for developing renal dietitians in Malaysia through nutrition research. For the past 26 years, nephrology healthcare professionals from across the country have come to NKF's Spring Clinical Meetings to learn about the newest developments related to all aspects of nephrology practice, network with colleagues, and present their research findings. The NKF Spring Clinical Meetings are designed for meaningful change in the multidisciplinary healthcare teams' skills, performance, and patient health outcomes.  It is the only conference of its kind that focuses on translating science into practice for the entire healthcare team. 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease.  26 million American adults have kidney disease—and most aren't aware of it.  Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, family history, and age 60+.  People of African American; Hispanic; Native American; Asian; or Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk for developing the disease.  African Americans are 3 ½ times more likely, and Hispanics 1 ½ times more likely, to experience kidney failure. The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the largest, most comprehensive and longstanding organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease.  For more information about NKF visit www.kidney.org. :  Full press releases on each award recipient, including quotes for attribution, are hyperlinked by recipient's name and can also be found in the Newsroom at www.kidney.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/national-kidney-foundation-honors-leading-researchers-clinicians-patient-advocates-and-more-at-its-26th-annual-spring-clinical-meetings-300442333.html

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