Bankstown, Australia
Bankstown, Australia

Time filter

Source Type

Glover A.R.,Kolling Institute of Medical Research | Ip J.C.Y.,Kolling Institute of Medical Research | Ting Zhao J.,Kolling Institute of Medical Research | Soon P.S.H.,Kolling Institute of Medical Research | And 5 more authors.
OncoTargets and Therapy | Year: 2013

Adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare cancer that poses a number of management challenges due to the limited number of effective systemic treatments. Complete surgical resection offers the best chance of long-term survival. However, despite complete resection, ACC is associated with high recurrence rates. This review will discuss the management of recurrent ACC in adults following complete surgical resection. Management should take place in a specialist center and treatment decisions must consider the individual tumor biology of each case of recurrence. Given the fact that ACC commonly recurs, management to prevent recurrence should be considered from initial diagnosis with the use of adjuvant mitotane. Close follow up with clinical examination and imaging is important for early detection of recurrent disease. Locoregional recurrence may be isolated, and repeat surgical resection should be considered along with mitotane. The use of radiotherapy in ACC remains controversial. Systemic recurrence most often involves liver, pulmonary, and bone metastasis and is usually managed with mitotane, with or without combination chemotherapy. There is a limited role for surgical resection in systemic recurrence in selected patients. In all patients with recurrent disease, control of excessive hormone production is an important part of management. Despite intensive management of recurrent ACC, treatment failure is common and the use of clinical trials and novel treatment is an important part of management. © 2013 Glover et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.


PubMed | Endocrine Surgical Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncology letters | Year: 2012

Breast metastasis from extra-mammary malignancy is rare. An incidence of 0.4-1.3% has been reported in the literature. The primary malignancies most commonly metastasizing to the breast are leukemia, lymphoma and malignant melanoma. We present a case of metastasis to the breast from a pulmonary adenocarcinoma, diagnosed concomitantly with the primary tumor. A 43-year-old female presented with dyspnea and a dry cough of 3 weeks duration. A subsequent chest radiograph revealed a massive pleural effusion. Additionally, on physical examination, a poorly defined mass was noted in the upper outer quadrant of the right breast. The patient underwent bronchoscopy, simple right mastectomy and medical thoracoscopy. Following cytology, histology and immunohistochemistry, primary lung adenocarcinoma with metastasis to the breast and parietal pleura was diagnosed. Histologically, both the primary and metastatic anatomic sites demonstrated a micropapillary component, which has recently been recognized as an important prognostic factor. Although the patient received chemotherapy, she succumbed to her condition within 8 months. Accurate differentiation of metastasis from primary carcinoma is very important as the treatment and prognosis of the two differ significantly.

Loading Endocrine Surgical Unit collaborators
Loading Endocrine Surgical Unit collaborators