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Mayo, MN, United States

Low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LC-HF) diets are popular for inducing weight loss in overweighed adults. Adaptive thermogenesis increased by specific effects of macronutrients on energy expenditure has been postulated to induce this weight loss. We studied brown adipose tissue (BAT) morphology and function following exposure to different LC-HF diets. Male Wistar rats were fed a standard control diet ad libitum or pair-fed isoenergetic amounts of three experimental diets for 4 weeks. The diets had the following macronutrient composition (% metabolizable energy: carbohydrates, fat, protein): control (64.3/16.7/19), LC-HF-low protein (LC-HF-LP, 1.7/92.8/5.5), LC-HF-normal-protein (LC-HF-NP, 2.2/78.7/19.1), and a high fat diet with carbohydrates ("high fat", 19.4/61.9/18.7). Body weight gain was reduced in all pair-fed experimental groups as compared to rats fed the control diet, with more pronounced effect in rats on LC-HF diets than on the high fat diet with carbohydrates. High fat diets increased expression of PGC1α and ADRB3 in BAT indicating higher SNS outflow. However, UCP1 mRNA expression and expression of UCP1 assessed by immunohistochemistry was not different between diet groups. In accordance, analysis of mitochondrial function in-vitro by extracellular flux analyser (Seahorse Bioscience) and measurement of inducible thermogenesis in vivo (primary endpoint), explored by indirect calorimetry following norepinephrine injection, did not show significant differences between groups. Histology of BAT revealed increased lipid droplet size in rats fed the high-fat diet and both LC-HF diets. All experimental diets upregulated expression of genes which are indicative for increased BAT activity. However, the functional measurements in vivo revealed no increase of inducible BAT thermogenesis. This indicates that lower body weight gain with LC-HF diets and a high fat diet in a pair-feeding setting is not caused by increased adaptive thermogenesis in BAT.


Blachnio-Zabielska A.U.,Endocrine Research Unit
Rapid communications in mass spectrometry : RCM | Year: 2011

Long-chain acyl-coenzymes A (acyl-CoAs) (LCACoA) are the activated forms of long-chain fatty acids and serve as key lipid metabolites. Excess accumulation of intracellular LCACoA, diacylglycerols (DAGs) and ceramides may create insulin resistance with respect to glucose metabolism. We present a new method to measure LCACoA concentrations and isotopic enrichment of palmitoyl-CoA ([U-(13) C]16-CoA) and oleoyl-CoA ([U-(13) C]18:1-CoA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to quantitate seven different LCACoA (C14-CoA, C16-CoA, C16:1-CoA, C18-CoA, C18:1-CoA, C18:2-CoA, C20-CoA). The molecules are separated on a reversed-phase UPLC column using a binary gradient with ammonium hydroxide (NH(4) OH) in water and NH(4) OH in acetonitrile (ACN). The LCACoA are quantified using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. All LCACoA ions except enriched palmitate enrichment of palmitoyl-CoA ([U(-13)C]16-CoA) and oleoyl-CoA ([U(-13)C]18:1-CoA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to quantitate seven different LCACoA (C14-CoA, C16-CoA, C16:1-CoA, C18-CoA, C18:1-CoA, C18:2-CoA, C20-CoA). The molecules are separated on a reversed-phase UPLC column using a binary gradient with ammonium hydroxide (NH(4) OH) in water and NH(4) OH in acetonitrile. The LCACoA are quantified using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupolemass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. All LCACoA ions except enriched palmitate and oleate were monitored as [M+2+H](+) and [U(13)C]16-CoA and [U(13)C]18:1-CoA were monitored as [M+16+H](+) and [M+18+H](+), respectively. The method is simple, sensitive and efficient (run time as short as 5 min) and allowed us to measure the concentration and detect enrichment in intramyocellular [U(13) C]16-CoA and [U(13) C]18:1-CoA during a low dose intravenous infusion of [U(13) C]palmitate and [U(13) C]oleate in adults undergoing either a saline control experiment or an insulin/glucose infusion experiment. This technique should allow investigators to measure the trafficking of extracellular fatty acids to the intracellular LCACoA pool. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Roelfsema F.,Leiden University | Veldhuis J.D.,Endocrine Research Unit
Endocrine Reviews | Year: 2013

Thyroid hormones are extremely important for metabolism, development, and growth during the lifetime. The hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis is precisely regulated for these purposes. Much of our knowledge of this hormonal axis is derived from experiments in animals and mutations in man. This review examines the hypothalamo- pituitary-thyroid axis particularly in relation to the regulated 24-hour serumTSHconcentration profiles in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including obesity, primary hypothyroidism, pituitary diseases, psychiatric disorders, and selected neurological diseases. Diurnal TSH rhythms can be analyzed with novel and precise techniques, eg, operator-independent deconvolution and approximate entropy. These approaches provide indirect insight in the regulatory components in pathophysiological conditions. © 2013 The Endocrine Society.


Tchkonia T.,Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging | Thomou T.,Harvard University | Zhu Y.,Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging | Karagiannides I.,University of California at Los Angeles | And 3 more authors.
Cell Metabolism | Year: 2013

Fat distribution is closely linked to metabolic disease risk. Distribution varies with sex, genetic background, disease state, certain drugs and hormones, development, and aging. Preadipocyte replication and differentiation, developmental gene expression, susceptibility to apoptosis and cellular senescence, vascularity, inflammatory cell infiltration, and adipokine secretion vary among depots, as do fatty-acid handling and mechanisms of enlargement with positive-energy and loss with negative-energy balance. How interdepot differences in these molecular, cellular, and pathophysiological properties are related is incompletely understood. Whether fat redistribution causes metabolic disease or whether it is a marker of underlying processes that are primarily responsible is an open question. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Conover C.A.,Endocrine Research Unit
Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2012

Twenty-five years after it was identified as a circulating protein of unknown function derived from the placenta, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) was discovered to be a novel zinc metalloproteinase expressed by a variety of cell types. Great progress has been made in understanding the biology of PAPP-A and its regulation during recent years, especially in regard to physiological and pathophysiological inflammatory injury responses. However, much remains to be learned about this complex protein and its potential clinical implications outside pregnancy. In this article we address some of the outstanding questions about PAPP-A, in particular about its newly emerging role in the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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