Time filter

Source Type

Thazhath S.S.,University of Adelaide | Wu T.,University of Adelaide | Bound M.J.,University of Adelaide | Checklin H.L.,University of Adelaide | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2016

Background: Resveratrol has been reported to lower glycemia in rodent models of type 2 diabetes associated with the stimulation of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is known to slow gastric emptying, stimulate insulin secretion, and suppress glucagon secretion and energy intake. Objective: We evaluated the effects of 5 wk of resveratrol treatment on GLP-1 secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Design: Fourteen patients with diet-controlled type-2 diabetes [mean ± SEM glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c): 6.4 ± 0.2% (46.4 ± 2.2 mmol/mol)] received resveratrol (500 mg twice daily) or a placebo over two 5-wk intervention periods with a 5-wk washout period in between in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Before and after each intervention period (4 visits), body weight and HbA1c were measured, and patients were evaluated after an overnight fast with a standardized mashed-potato meal labeled with 100 mg 13C-octanoic acid to measure blood glucose and plasma GLP-1 concentrations and gastric emptying (breath test) over 240 min. Daily energy intake was estimated from 3-d food diaries during the week before each visit. Results: Fasting and postprandial blood glucose and plasma total GLP-1 as well as gastric emptying were similar at each assessment, and the change in each variable from weeks 0 to 5 did not differ between resveratrol and placebo groups. Similarly, changes in HbA1c, daily energy intake, and body weight after 5 wk did not differ between the 2 treatments. Conclusions: In patients with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes, 5 wk of twice-daily 500 mg-resveratrol supplementation had no effect on GLP-1 secretion, glycemic control, gastric emptying, body weight, or energy intake. Our observations do not support the use of resveratrol for improving glycemic control. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.


Strollo F.,Endocrine and Metabolic Unit | Strollo G.,Fbf S Peters Hospital | More M.,Endocrine and Metabolic Unit | Magni P.,University of Milan | And 6 more authors.
Aging Male | Year: 2013

An open-label follow-up study of low-to-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) was conducted in 64 overweight patients (aged 65-75 years) with late onset hypogonadism (LOH) and increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Patients were subdivided into four treatment groups: oral testosterone (T) (T undecanoate, 80mg/d), transmucosal T (60mg/d), transdermal T (30mg/d) or no treatment (control), and evaluated at 0 and 6 months. FPG, hemoglobin (Hb), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and total T were measured and the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fitness level (6-min walking test), Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale, handgrip strength and energy expenditure with physical activity (Minnesota questionnaire for Leisure Time Physical Activity (LTPA)) were evaluated and a "frailty score" (based on: grip strength, gait speed and LTPA) was calculated. T levels increased in all treatment groups; the oral T group had values still in the hypogonadal range (5.9±1.1nmol/L). PSA and Hb concentrations did not change in any group. BMI, waist circumference, FPG and HOMA-IR improved in all T-treated groups after 6 months, with a greater effect seen with transmucosal and transdermal T compared with oral T. This study indicates that low-to-intermediate dose TRT may be safely utilized in LOH patients to ameliorate somatic and psychological frailty symptoms in association with improved anthropometric and glycometabolic parameters in aging, overweight men with LOH and impaired fasting glucose. © 2013 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.


PubMed | Endocrine and Metabolic Unit
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: The aging male : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male | Year: 2013

An open-label follow-up study of low-to-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) was conducted in 64 overweight patients (aged 65-75 years) with late onset hypogonadism (LOH) and increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Patients were subdivided into four treatment groups: oral testosterone (T) (T undecanoate, 80mg/d), transmucosal T (60mg/d), transdermal T (30mg/d) or no treatment (control), and evaluated at 0 and 6 months. FPG, hemoglobin (Hb), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and total T were measured and the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fitness level (6-min walking test), Aging Males Symptoms (AMS) scale, handgrip strength and energy expenditure with physical activity (Minnesota questionnaire for Leisure Time Physical Activity (LTPA)) were evaluated and a frailty score (based on: grip strength, gait speed and LTPA) was calculated. T levels increased in all treatment groups; the oral T group had values still in the hypogonadal range (5.91.1nmol/L). PSA and Hb concentrations did not change in any group. BMI, waist circumference, FPG and HOMA-IR improved in all T-treated groups after 6 months, with a greater effect seen with transmucosal and transdermal T compared with oral T. This study indicates that low-to-intermediate dose TRT may be safely utilized in LOH patients to ameliorate somatic and psychological frailty symptoms in association with improved anthropometric and glycometabolic parameters in aging, overweight men with LOH and impaired fasting glucose.


PubMed | Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri Instituto Of Ricovero E Cura A Carattere Scientifico, Diabetic Unit and Endocrine and Metabolic Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Hormones (Athens, Greece) | Year: 2014

Metformin treatment may induce a decrease/suppression in serum TSH levels, mimicking sub-clinical hyperthyroidism (SHT). The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate changes in several electrocardiographic indices in euthyroid subjects with diabetes who, after starting metformin treatment, developed a low serum TSH as compared to patients with SHT resulting from an underlying thyroid disease or TSH suppressive treatment with L-thyroxine.Heart rate, P wave duration, P wave dispersion, QTmax, QTmin and QT-dispersion were assessed in 23 patients with diabetes treated with metformin before and after 6 months of TSH-suppression and in 31 control patients with SHT.No significant changes in electrocardiographic parameters were observed from baseline to the TSH-suppression measurement. A significant difference in P wave duration (102.9 7.4 vs. 92.1 5.8 ms, p<0.001), P wave dispersion (13.1 3.4 vs. 7.1 3.5 ms, p<0.001), QTmax (399 18 vs. 388 16 ms, p=0.024), QTmin (341 14 vs. 350 17 ms, p=0.038) and QT dispersion (49.9 9.6 vs. 30.9 9.2 ms, p<0.001) were observed between the control group with SHT and the group of diabetic patients with low serum levels of TSH.Our results show that the TSH-suppressive effect observed in patients taking metformin is not associated with peripheral markers of thyroid hormone excess, at least at the cardiac level.

Loading Endocrine and Metabolic Unit collaborators
Loading Endocrine and Metabolic Unit collaborators