Emschergenossenschaft

Essen, Germany

Emschergenossenschaft

Essen, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Berzio S.,Ruhr University Bochum | Lange R.-L.,Emschergenossenschaft | Schluter M.,Ikt Institute For Unterirdische Infrastruktur | Ulutas S.,Ikt Institute For Unterirdische Infrastruktur | And 2 more authors.
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2017

Regular sewer cleaning in North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany) generates annual costs of around 50 million Euros. This leads to the question of whether and to what extent sewer cleaning is necessary. To determine the effect of roughness, sewer surface condition and discharge, experiments with real wastewater were performed, using a sewer test track with acrylic glass tubes (DN 300) prepared with abrasive paper and nature stone tiles at the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) Bochum-Ölbachtal (Ruhrverband, Germany). A logarithmic relationship between deposit height and time was found to lead to maximum deposit heights of 5 to 60 mm. Surface structure analysis by texture measuring indicated that deposits within the first 28 days after cleaning are highly influenced by the surface condition of the sewer and not necessarily by roughness. Furthermore, under dry weather conditions deposit heights are nearly stable after this time, indicating the limiting effect of sewer cleaning. Deposit formation amounted to 1.75-1.80 mm/d at a roughness of ks = 0.10 mm (fine but catchy microstructure) and 0-0.1 mm/d at ks 1.25 mm (wavy microstructure) at steady state and transient discharge within the first 28 days after sewer cleaning. © IWA Publishing 2017.


Frerk I.,Hydro and Meteo GmbH and Co. KG | Treis A.,Emschergenossenschaft | Einfalt T.,Hydro and Meteo GmbH and Co. KG | Jessen M.,Hydro and Meteo GmbH and Co. KG
9th International Workshop on Precipitation in Urban Areas: Urban Challenges in Rainfall Analysis, UrbanRain 2012 | Year: 2017

Ten years of quality controlled and adjusted radar data have been produced for ten water boards in North-Rhine Westphalia. The data have a spatial resolution of approximately 1 km2 and a time step of 5 minutes. The basic data from radar and rain gauges have undergone a considerable quality control and correction procedure. The resulting data are now used for rainfall-runoff simulation of flood events and intercompared to the use of other data sources. Also, flood events without any apparent precipitation at the gauges can now better be understood and explained. Conclusions are drawn and an outlook into future works is performed.


Jekel M.,TU Berlin | Dott W.,RWTH Aachen | Bergmann A.,Water Center | Dunnbier U.,Berliner Wasserbetriebe | And 11 more authors.
Chemosphere | Year: 2015

An increasing number of organic micropollutants (OMP) is detected in anthropogenically influenced water cycles. Source control and effective natural and technical barriers are essential to maintain a high quality of drinking water resources under these circumstances. Based on the literature and our own research this study proposes a limited number of OMP that can serve as indicator substances for the major sources of OMP, such as wastewater treatment plants, agriculture and surface runoff. Furthermore functional indicators are proposed that allow assessment of the proper function of natural and technical barriers in the aquatic environment, namely conventional municipal wastewater treatment, advanced treatment (ozonation, activated carbon), bank filtration and soil aquifer treatment as well as self-purification in surface water. These indicator substances include the artificial sweetener acesulfame, the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen, the anticonvulsant carbamazepine, the corrosion inhibitor benzotriazole and the herbicide mecoprop among others. The chemical indicator substances are intended to support comparisons between watersheds and technical and natural processes independent of specific water cycles and to reduce efforts and costs of chemical analyses without losing essential information. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Trautmann N.,Leibniz University of Hanover | Beier M.,Leibniz University of Hanover | Phan L.-C.,Emschergenossenschaft | Rosenwinkel K.-H.,Leibniz University of Hanover
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2011

Economic growth in Vietnam in the last few years has brought about an increasing demand for energy and has had a severe environmental impact. Fish processing is one of the fastest-growing industries that discharge organically-polluted wastewater. To counter these environmental problems, new technologies for energy-efficient treatment are needed. By coupling innovative nitrogen removal systems with anaerobic treatment processes, it is possible to realise such technologies. In the present project, a combined deammonification and anaerobic carbon removal system is presented. Special requirements to enable reliable treatment are discussed, taking industrial wastewater characteristics into consideration. To evaluate energetic efficiency, energy balance calculations based on data from a fish-processing factory are made. The determined specific energy consumption and production rates show that energy recovery is possible, even when COD and nitrogen removal efficiencies of over 90% are achieved. Depending on the pre-treatment employed, energy recovery rates ranging from 0.6 to 2.5 kWh/mt raw fish can be reached. © IWA Publishing 2011.


The catchment area of the Emscher encloses the core area of the former industrial district "Ruhr area" (Ruhrgebiet) with cities like Dortmund, Bochum, Gelsenkirchen, Essen, Oberhausen and Duisburg. With a population density of app. 2 700 inhabitants/km2, the Emscher region is one of the biggest and most densely populated conurbations in Europe. After the decline of the coal mining and steal industries in the last decades of the 20th century, the region is in an on-going process of transformation. After 100 years of the use of former natural water courses as waste water channels in an area of mining-induced subsidences, the river system of the Emscher will now be restored. The rebuilding of the whole river systems is probably the biggest water management project in Europe, with a total investment of 4.5 billion Euros. The Emscher refurbishment provides a new urban biodiversity, leisure and recreation spaces. It also contributes to climate protection and town development. The challenges of river restoration in densely populated areas can be studied exemplarily in the Emscher area, as well as the chances and limits of the development of the new watercourses, with special regard to the European Water Framework Directive. The control of success is conducted by a standardized monitoring system. Selected results of the ecological investigations after 20 years of river revitalization are presented.


Genzowsky K.,RWTH Aachen | Leupolt C.,Max Planck Institute for Physics | Frehmann T.,Emschergenossenschaft | Krost G.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Gramlich E.,TUTTAHS and MEYER Ingenieurgesellschaft fur Wasser Abwasser und Energiewirtschaft mbH
At-Automatisierungstechnik | Year: 2015

Sewage treatment plants are characterized by a significant electric power consumption but the organic content of the wastewater can be used for local electricity generation. At the wastewater treament plant Bottrop technically and economically promising combinations of renewable energy should be installed and tested as a prototype. For this purpose a preparatory simulation is required in order to develop a suitable facility design and optimal operating strategies. © 2015 Walter de Gruyter Berlin/Boston.


Stemplewski J.,Emschergenossenschaft | Sauerland C.,Emschergenossenschaft | Sommerhauser M.,Emschergenossenschaft
Geographische Rundschau | Year: 2013

The catchment area of the Emscher encloses the core area of the former industrial district. Ruhr area" (Ruhrgebiet) with cities like Dortmund, Bochum, Gelsenkirchen, Essen, Oberhausen and Duisburg. With a population density of app. 2,700 inhabitants/km2, the Emscher region is one of the biggest and most densely populated conurbations in Europe. After the decline of the coal mining and steal industries in the last decades of the 20th century, the region is in an ongoing process of transformation. After 100 years of the use of former natural water courses as waste water channels in an area of mining-induced subsidences, the river system of the Emscher will now be restored. The rebuilding of the whole river systems is the biggest water management project in Europe, with a total investment of 4.5 billion Euros. The Emscher refurbishment provides not only a new urban biodiversity, leisure and recreation spaces but also stimulates renewable energies, climate protection, and town development.


Reinders M.,Research Institute for Water and Waste Management FiW | Beckhaus P.,Zentrum fur BrennstoffzellenTechnik ZBT GmbH | Illing F.,IBR Ingenieurburo Redlich und Partner GmbH | Misz U.,Zentrum fur BrennstoffzellenTechnik ZBT GmbH | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Hydrogen Energy | Year: 2015

Hydrogen can play an important role in a future renewable energy economy. One promising method for hydrogen production with the potential for integration into a local supply chain in the vicinity of wastewater treatment plants was investigated during the EuWaK project at Emschergenossenschaft's Bottrop wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The raw material for hydrogen production is digester gas, a renewable energy source. The digester gas is processed into bio natural gas and hydrogen. The hydrogen is used in a combined heat and power plant with a hydrogen engine to produce electricity and heat to supply a nearby school. An attractive alternative to a hydrogen engine is a fuel cell. Fuel cells require hydrogen conforming to stricter quality standards than H2 engines; therefore trialling quality management methods with a model fuel cell is an important safeguard in order to protect downstream fuel cells if digester gas derived hydrogen is to be used. Copyright © 2015 Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.WATER INNO&DEMO-1 | Award Amount: 9.07M | Year: 2014

The main objectives of DESSIN are - To demonstrate and promote innovative solutions to water-related challenges with a focus on: (i) water quality issues related to the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and (ii) water scarcity. - To demonstrate a methodology for the valuation of ecosystem services (ESS) as catalyser for innovation in water management. DESSIN will launch demonstration projects of innovative solutions for the two challenges mentioned above, with special focus on urban areas. Solutions will integrate technological, monitoring, modeling and management approaches for a more resource-efficient and competitive water sector in Europe. As a second key feature, an Evaluation Framework to account for changes in the value of ecosystem services (ESS) of water bodies that result from implementation of the solutions will be developed and applied. By adopting this twofold approach, we will be able to demonstrate how innovative solutions integrated in the water cycle can increase the value of the services provided by freshwater ecosystems, thus generating additional incentives and arguments for their market uptake and practical implementation. This will support innovation and competitiveness in water management by enabling a more informed selection of the most promising solutions, as regards their impact on the water body and their economic implications. The whole project is centered around the following suite of carefully selected sites across Europe, representative of global major water challenges, where we bring together public and private water management organisations and end-users, technology providers (SMEs), supporting RTD experts and relevant public authorities to demonstrate this approach: Emscher (Germany), Hoffselva (Oslo area, Norway), Westland (The Netherlands), Athens (Greece) and Llobregat (Barcelona Area, Spain).


Walter C.,Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation | Saenz J.,Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation | Elkmann N.,Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation | Althoff H.,Emschergenossenschaft | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Field Robotics | Year: 2012

On behalf of the Emschergenossenschaft, a public wastewater utility based in Essen, Germany, the Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation (IFF) in Magdeburg has developed a novel robotic system, the damage measuring and cleaning system (SVM-RS), for cleaning and inspecting large-diameter sewers that are partially filled and in normal operation. The SVM-RS was specifically designed and built for use in the Emscher sewer system and employs a multisensor approach for a high-resolution inspection of the pipe, both above and below the water. Furthermore, robotics technologies are used in combination with traditional high-pressure cleaning techniques to achieve high-quality cleaning results. In addition to the hardware design, a number of software developments in the areas of software architecture, image processing, and data fusion for understanding and presenting the data, as well as teleoperation techniques, have been carried out in the course of the project. Here automatic detection of damage as well as other features present in the environment has proven to be of importance. Design considerations and solutions for individual components of the cleaning and inspection are described within the context of the whole system, and the results of specific tests and experiments are presented. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Loading Emschergenossenschaft collaborators
Loading Emschergenossenschaft collaborators