Miami, FL, United States
Miami, FL, United States

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Rouseff M.,Baptist Health South Florida | Aneni E.C.,Mount Sinai Medical Center | Aneni E.C.,Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes | Aneni E.C.,Florida International University | And 22 more authors.
Obesity | Year: 2016

Objective This study details 6- and 12-month cardio-metabolic outcomes of an intense 12-week workplace lifestyle intervention program, the My Unlimited Potential (MyUP), conducted in a large healthcare organization. Methods This study was conducted among 230 employees of Baptist Health South Florida with high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Employees were considered at high risk and eligible for the study if they had two or more of the following cardio-metabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥ 200 mg/dl, systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5%, body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2. Results At the end of 12 weeks, there was significant reduction in the mean BMI, SBP and DBP, serum lipids, and HbA1c among persons with diabetes. At 1 year, there was significant decline in the mean BMI, SBP and DBP, HbA1c, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and in the prevalence of poor BP control, BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2, and abnormal HbA1c among all persons and those with diabetes. Conclusions This intensive 12-week lifestyle change program was successful at improving cardio-metabolic risk factors at 1 year. This study provides a template for other workplace programs aimed at improving CVD risk in high-risk employees. © 2015 The Obesity Society.


Osondu C.U.,Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes | Osondu C.U.,Florida International University | Aneni E.C.,Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes | Aneni E.C.,Florida International University | And 27 more authors.
Population Health Management | Year: 2016

This is a single-arm, pre and post effectiveness study that evaluated the impact of a comprehensive workplace lifestyle program on severe obesity among high cardiovascular disease risk individuals in a large, diverse employee population. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida were considered eligible to participate if they had 2 or more of the following cardiometabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%, body mass index ≥30kg/m2. Participants received a personalized diet plan and physical activity intervention, and were followed for 1 year. Data on anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other biochemical measures were collected. Participants' body mass index was calculated and their eligibility for bariatric surgery (BS) also assessed. A total of 297 persons participated in the program; 160 participants completed all procedures through 12 months of follow-up. At baseline, 34% (n = 100) of all participants were eligible for BS. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 27% (n = 27) of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible after 12 months. Considering program completers only, 46% of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible. Irrespective of BS eligibility at 12 months, mean values of cardiometabolic risk factors among program completers improved after the follow-up period. Workplace wellness programs provide an important option for weight loss that can obviate the need for BS, reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and potentially reduce costs. However, in designing future worksite lifestyle interventions, measures should be taken to improve participation and retention rates in such programs. © Copyright 2016, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


PubMed | Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes, Baptist Hospital, Center for Performance Excellence, Employee Health Management and 3 more.
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) | Year: 2015

This study details 6- and 12-month cardio-metabolic outcomes of an intense 12-week workplace lifestyle intervention program, the My Unlimited Potential (MyUP), conducted in a large healthcare organization.This study was conducted among 230 employees of Baptist Health South Florida with high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Employees were considered at high risk and eligible for the study if they had two or more of the following cardio-metabolic risk factors: total cholesterol 200 mg/dl, systolic blood pressure (SBP) 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) 90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) 6.5%, body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m(2) .At the end of 12 weeks, there was significant reduction in the mean BMI, SBP and DBP, serum lipids, and HbA1c among persons with diabetes. At 1 year, there was significant decline in the mean BMI, SBP and DBP, HbA1c, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and in the prevalence of poor BP control, BMI 35 kg/m(2) , and abnormal HbA1c among all persons and those with diabetes.This intensive 12-week lifestyle change program was successful at improving cardio-metabolic risk factors at 1 year. This study provides a template for other workplace programs aimed at improving CVD risk in high-risk employees.


Ogunmoroti O.,Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes | Ogunmoroti O.,Florida International University | Utuama O.,University of South Florida | Spatz E.S.,Yale New Haven Hospital | And 19 more authors.
American Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2016

The American Heart Association (AHA)'s 2020 goal is to improve the cardiovascular health (CVH) of people living in the United States (US) by 20% and reduce mortality from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20%. Given that 155 million adults are in the US workforce, and >60% have employee-based insurance, workplace studies provide an important opportunity to assess and potentially advance CVH through the use of comprehensive workplace wellness programs. Among a cohort of employees of the Baptist Health System, CVH was assessed annually during voluntary health fairs and health risk assessments (HRA) from 2011 to 2014 using the AHA's 7 CVH metrics: smoking, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, diet, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and blood glucose. Each metric was categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor according to the AHA criteria. Cochrane-Armitage test was used to detect trends in CVH by year. Ideal CVH, defined as meeting ideal criteria for all 7 metrics, was assessed and compared across years. The overall cohort was 34,746 with 4,895 employees in 2011, 10,724 in 2012, 9,763 in 2013, and 9,364 in 2014. Mean age (SD) was between 43 (±12) and 46 years (±12). Female to male ratio was 3:1. The prevalence of study participants who met the ideal criteria for diet, physical activity, and blood pressure increased significantly from 2011 to 2014 but for BMI, total cholesterol, and blood glucose, a significant decrease was noticed. In addition, the prevalence of study participants in ideal CVH although low, increased significantly over time (0.3% to 0.6%, p <0.0001). In conclusion, this study shows the trends of the AHA's CVH metrics in a large health care organization. The positive findings noted for the metrics of smoking, physical activity, total cholesterol, and blood glucose should be reinforced. However, the metrics of diet, BMI, and blood pressure need more attention. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Ogunmoroti O.,Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes Research | Ogunmoroti O.,Florida International University | Younus A.,Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes Research | Rouseff M.,Baptist Health South Florida | And 19 more authors.
Clinical Cardiology | Year: 2015

Background Healthcare organizations and their employees are critical role models for healthy living in their communities. The American Heart Association (AHA) 2020 impact goal provides a national framework that can be used to track the success of employee wellness programs with a focus on improving cardiovascular (CV) health. This study aimed to assess the CV health of the employees of Baptist Health South Florida (BHSF), a large nonprofit healthcare organization. Hypothesis HRAs and wellness examinations can be used to measure the cardiovascular health status of an employee population. Methods The AHA's 7 CV health metrics (diet, physical activity, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and blood glucose) categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor were estimated among employees of BHSF participating voluntarily in an annual health risk assessment (HRA) and wellness fair. Age and gender differences were analyzed using χ2 test. Results The sample consisted of 9364 employees who participated in the 2014 annual HRA and wellness fair (mean age [standard deviation], 43 [12] years, 74% women). Sixty (1%) individuals met the AHA's definition of ideal CV health. Women were more likely than men to meet the ideal criteria for more than 5 CV health metrics. The proportion of participants meeting the ideal criteria for more than 5 CV health metrics decreased with age. Conclusions A combination of HRAs and wellness examinations can provide useful insights into the cardiovascular health status of an employee population. Future tracking of the CV health metrics will provide critical feedback on the impact of system wide wellness efforts as well as identifying proactive programs to assist in making substantial progress toward the AHA 2020 Impact Goal. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Center for Healthcare Advancement and Outcomes Research, Center for Performance and Excellence, Center for Research and Grants, Employee Health Management and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical cardiology | Year: 2015

Healthcare organizations and their employees are critical role models for healthy living in their communities. The American Heart Association (AHA) 2020 impact goal provides a national framework that can be used to track the success of employee wellness programs with a focus on improving cardiovascular (CV) health. This study aimed to assess the CV health of the employees of Baptist Health South Florida (BHSF), a large nonprofit healthcare organization.HRAs and wellness examinations can be used to measure the cardiovascular health status of an employee population.The AHAs 7 CV health metrics (diet, physical activity, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and blood glucose) categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor were estimated among employees of BHSF participating voluntarily in an annual health risk assessment (HRA) and wellness fair. Age and gender differences were analyzed using (2) test.The sample consisted of 9364 employees who participated in the 2014 annual HRA and wellness fair (mean age [standard deviation], 43 [12] years, 74% women). Sixty (1%) individuals met the AHAs definition of ideal CV health. Women were more likely than men to meet the ideal criteria for more than 5 CV health metrics. The proportion of participants meeting the ideal criteria for more than 5 CV health metrics decreased with age.A combination of HRAs and wellness examinations can provide useful insights into the cardiovascular health status of an employee population. Future tracking of the CV health metrics will provide critical feedback on the impact of system wide wellness efforts as well as identifying proactive programs to assist in making substantial progress toward the AHA 2020 Impact Goal.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Worksite Wellness Council of Massachusetts (WWCMA) announces the that application process for the WorkWell Massachusetts Awards program will open Saturday, April 1, 2017. The award program aims to recognize best practices in worksite wellness programming among employers in the Commonwealth. The program recognizes Massachusetts’ employers of all industries and sizes that are committed to creating a healthier worksite. WWCMA will host a webinar on Wednesday, March 8 at 12:00 PM Eastern Time to review the process and answer questions from potential applicants. Register here. Applications for gold, silver and bronze recognition will require a two-step process: 1. Complete the Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO) Employee Health Management Best Practices Scorecard. The HERO scorecard assesses strategic planning, targeted planning, program design and integration, engagement and evaluation. 2. Complete a set of supplemental questions to understand your organization’s wellness program and top line areas of overall wellness programming and results. A committee of independent industry professionals who have been appointed by WWCMA will review the applications. Winners will be notified in August and announced at the WWCMA’s 6th Annual Conference.

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