Atlanta, GA, United States
Atlanta, GA, United States

Emory University is a private research university in metropolitan Atlanta, located in the Druid Hills section of unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. The university was founded as Emory College in 1836 in Oxford, Georgia by the Methodist Episcopal Church and was named in honor of Methodist bishop John Emory. In 1915 the college relocated to metropolitan Atlanta and was rechartered as Emory University.Emory University has nine academic divisions: Emory College of Arts and science, Oxford College, Goizueta Business School, Laney Graduate School, School of Law, School of Medicine, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Rollins School of Public Health, and the Candler School of Theology. Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology have a strong research partnership and jointly administer the Emory-Georgia Tech Predictive Health Institute and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering Program with Peking University in Beijing, China. Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology's combined annual research expenditures exceed $1.25 billion.Emory University is 16th among the list of colleges and universities in the United States by endowment, 5th among universities in the United States regarding licensing revenue per dollars spent on research, and 21st in U.S. News & World Report's 2015 National Universities Rankings. The university also ranks as one of the top universities in the world. In 1995 Emory University was elected to the Association of American Universities, an association of the 62 leading research universities in the United States & Canada.The university has nearly 3,000 faculty members; Emory faculty and alumni include international leaders in the fields of politics, business and academia, and its members have been recognized with numerous national and international awards and honors. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Patent
Emory University | Date: 2016-09-22

These systems and devices can be placed on top of any commercially available standard operating table and therefore can provide a portable and inexpensive alternative to commercially available specialized operating tables. The system may include a frame body having a first end, a second end, and a length therebetween. The system may also include one or more movable platforms having a first end, a second end, and a length therebetween. Each moveable platform may be configured to move between the first end and the second end of the frame body. The system may also include one or more stabilizing support members disposed parallel to the first end and the second end of the frame body and configured to move along the length of the movable platform. Each stabilizing support member may include one or more securing members configured for removable, active and/or removable fixation with respect to the movable platform.


The disclosure relates to Prostaglandin receptor EP2 antagonists, derivatives, compositions, and methods related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of treating or preventing conditions and diseases in which EP2 receptor activation has a physiological role, such as but not limited to, brain injury, inflammatory diseases, neuroinflamation after a seizure, pain, endometriosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, skin inflammation, vascular inflammation, colitis, and neurological disorders by administering a pharmaceutical composition comprising a compound disclosed herein to a subject in need thereof.


In certain embodiments, this disclosure relates to methods of treating or preventing HvGD comprising administering an effective amount of indole-2-carboxyaldehyde, indole-3-carboxyaldehyde, or derivative to a subject in need thereof. In certain embodiments, this disclosure relates to methods of treating a subject with a hematological malignancy or other cancer comprising transplanting allogenic bone marrow or stem cells in combination with administering an effective amount of an indole-2-carboxyaldehyde, indole-3-carboxyaldehyde, or derivative thereof to a subject in need thereof.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2016-12-06

The disclosure relates to chemokine CXCR4 receptor modulators and uses related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to pharmaceutical compositions comprising compounds disclosed herein or pharmaceutically acceptable salts or prodrugs thereof. In certain embodiments, the compositions disclosed herein are used for managing CXCR4 related conditions, typically prevention or treatment of viral infections such as HIV or for managing cancer.


Patent
Emory University and Regent University | Date: 2015-05-05

The disclosure relates to BH4 inhibitors and therapeutic uses relates thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of treating or preventing cancer, such as lung cancer, comprising administering therapeutically effective amount of a pharmaceutical composition comprising a compound disclosed herein or pharmaceutically acceptable salt to a subject in need thereof.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2016-11-18

Provided are steroid analogues functionalized with polar substituents at the C3 and/or C20 positions of the steroid ring system that exhibit improved water solubility. Also provided are pharmaceutical compositions comprising the steroid analogues and methods using the novel steroid analogues for the treatment and prevention of neurodegeneration in a patient following injury to the central nervous system.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2015-04-28

Systems and methods are configured to treat a tissue by automatically linearly oscillating an instrument into a target site. A system may include a body having a length and configured to receive a portion of the instrument guide member having an exposed end and/or an instrument. The system may further include an actuator member disposed within the body and configured to linearly oscillate the instrument within the instrument guide member a fixed distance past the exposed end. The systems and methods can increase patient comfort while empowering clinicians by simplifying interventions for musculoskeletal disorders.


Patent
Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology | Date: 2016-03-18

Various embodiments of the present invention provide a conduit system including an outer lumen, an inner lumen, and an attaching device. In other embodiments, a multiple access port device adapted for communication with at least one of an outer lumen, an inner lumen, or an attaching device of a conduit system is provided. In yet other embodiments, a system including an inner lumen that is collapsible is provided. Means for closing a conduit system are also provided, including a plug for insertion through an attaching device and a variable radius coiled member associated with an attaching device.


This disclosure relates to methods of identifying subjects that have an increased likelihood of responding to a combination of a poly (ADP) ribose polymerase enzyme inhibitor and a platinum based reagent and optionally other anticancer agents in the course of chemotherapy. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of treating cancer comprising administering an effective amount of a poly (ADP) ribose polymerase enzyme inhibitor and a platinum based reagent to the subject in need thereof, wherein the subject is in need thereof because measuring a quantity of RNA isolated from a cancer cell from the subject indicates an increased quantity of the RNA compared to a normal sample, wherein the RNA is associated with one or more of the following genes/pseudogenes GLS, UBEC2, HACL1, MSI2, and LOC100129585.


This disclosure relates to variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) modifications such as humanized sequences and polypeptides comprising such sequences that specifically bind a target molecule and uses related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to recombinant polypeptide VLRs disclosed herein and variants thereof. In certain embodiments, this disclosure relates to treating or preventing a disease or condition comprising administering an effective amount of a recombinant poly-peptide or variant disclosed herein to a subject in need thereof.


Patent
Cocrystal Pharma Inc. and Emory University | Date: 2016-04-15

The present invention is directed to compounds, compositions and methods for treating or preventing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in human subjects or other animal hosts. The compounds are as also pharmaceutically acceptable, salts, prodrugs, and other derivatives thereof as pharmaceutical compositions and methods for treatment or prevention of HCV infection.


This disclosure relates to manipulating microRNA for the management of neurological disorders and compositions related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure contemplates inhibition of miR324 or miR324-5p, e.g., the use of nucleobase polymers for antisense disruptions or RNA interference of miR-324 expression or for miR324-5p binding in order to increase Kv4.2 expression. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of treating or preventing a neurological disease or condition comprising administering an effective amount of an inhibitor to a subject in need thereto.


The disclosure relates to Prostaglandin receptor EP2 antagonists, derivatives, compositions, and methods related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of treating or preventing conditions and diseases in which EP2 receptor activation has a physiological role, such as but not limited to, brain injury, inflammatory diseases, neuroinflammation after a seizure, pain, endometriosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, skin inflammation, vascular inflammation, colitis, and neurological disorders by administering a pharmaceutical composition comprising a compound disclosed herein to a subject in need thereof.


Patent
Emory University and Children's Healthcare Of Atlanta | Date: 2015-04-13

This disclosure relates to recombinant proteins comprising a GM-CSF sequence and an interleukin sequence and nucleic acids related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to recombinant proteins comprises N-terminal sequences that are the result of improved production techniques and uses for treating or preventing autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and cancer.


Patent
Duke University and Emory University | Date: 2015-02-18

Provided herein are recombinant constructs, vectors and expression cassettes including a first promoter which is suitably a tRNA promoter operably connected to a first polynucleotide encoding a first single guide RNA and a second promoter operably connected to a second polynucleotide encoding a Cas9 polypeptide. The first single guide RNA includes a first portion complementary to a strand of a target sequence of a DNA virus and a second portion capable of interacting with the Cas9 polypeptide. Also provided are codon optimized Staphylococcus aureus derived Cas9 polynucleotides and polypeptides with nuclear localization signals and optionally an epitope tag. Also provided are constructs for production of sgRNAs including a tRNA. Methods of inhibiting viral replication, inhibiting expression of a target sequence from a virus or treating a viral infection or viral induced cancer using the compositions are also provided.


The disclosure relates to compounds and compositions for forming bone and methods related thereto. In one embodiment, the disclosure relates to a composition comprising a compound disclosed herein, such as 2,4-diamino-1,3,5-triazine derivatives or salts thereof, for use in bone growth processes. In a typical embodiment, a bone graft composition is implanted in a subject at a site of desired bone growth or enhancement.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2015-05-05

This disclosure relates to methods of treating and diagnosing a tuberculosis infection as pulmonary active or latent based on biomarkers expressed on pools of CD4^(+) cells. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of treatment of a subject diagnosed with tuberculosis comprising the steps of, measuring a pool of CD4^(+)IFN- cells for cells that also express CD38, HLA-DR, and/or Ki-67 providing a measurement; associating an increased measurement of CD4^(+)IFN- cells that also express CD38, HLA-DR, Ki-67, compared to a control, as an indication that the subject has active tuberculosis; and treating the subject with an aggressive tuberculosis treatment.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2015-05-14

Methods and systems relate to dynamic management of a health condition based on the changing needs and status of individual patient(s) and/or provider(s). The method may include processing information to determine one or more health management factors for a patient; generating a health management plan for managing a health condition of the patient based on the one or more management factors, the management plan including one or more goals, treatment regimen information, one or more prompt conditions, one or more attributes of one or more treatment events, or a combination thereof; and generating one or more prompt(s) based on the management plan.


Patent
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Emory University | Date: 2017-02-22

The present invention is based, in part, on the identification of novel human anti-PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 antibodies. Accordingly, the invention relates to compositions and methods for diagnosing, prognosing, and treating conditions that would benefit from modulating PD-1, PD-L1, and/or PD-L2 activity (e.g., persistent infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, asthma, transplant rejection, inflammatory disorders and tumors) using the novel human anti-PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 antibodies described herein.


Patent
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham, Women's Hospital, Emory University and The President And Fellows Of Harvard College | Date: 2017-02-15

The present invention provides methods and compositions for the treatment, prevention, or reduction of persistent infections, such as chronic infections, latent infections, and slow infections and cancer. The methods and compositions of the invention are also useful for the alleviation of one or more symptoms associated with such infections and cancer.


The disclosure relates to chemokine CXCR4 receptor modulators and uses related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to pharmaceutical compositions comprising compounds disclosed herein or pharmaceutically acceptable salts or prodrugs thereof. In certain embodiments, the compositions disclosed herein are used for managing CXCR4 related conditions, typically prevention or treatment of viral infections such as HIV or for managing cancer.


Boettcher S.,Emory University | Li S.,Emory University
Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical | Year: 2017

We evaluate spectral zeta-functions of certain network Laplacians that can be treated exactly with the renormalization group. As specific examples we consider a class of Hanoi networks and those hierarchical networks obtained by the Migdal-Kadanoff bond moving scheme from regular lattices. As possible applications of these results we mention quantum search algorithms as well as synchronization, which we discuss in more detail. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Dawson P.A.,Emory University
Digestive Diseases | Year: 2017

Background: In addition to their classical role as detergents, bile acids function as signaling molecules to regulate gastrointestinal physiology, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and energy expenditure. The pharmacodynamic potential of bile acids is dependent in part on the tight pharmacokinetic control of their concentration and metabolism, properties governed by their hepatic synthesis, enterohepatic cycling, and biotransformation via host and gut microbiota-catalyzed pathways. Key Messages: By altering the normal cycling and compartmentalization of bile acids, changes in hepatobiliary or intestinal transport can affect signaling and lead to the retention of cytotoxic hydrophobic bile acids and cell injury. This review discusses advances in our understanding of the intestinal transporters that maintain the enterohepatic cycling of bile acids, signaling via bile acid-activated nuclear and G protein receptors, and mechanisms of bile acid-induced cell injury. Conclusions: Dysregulated expression of the Asbt and Ostα-Ostβ alters bile acid signaling via the gut-liver farnesoid X receptor-fibroblast growth factor 15/19 axis and may contribute to other bile acid-regulated metabolic and cell injury pathways. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Loos R.J.F.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Janssens A.C.J.W.,Emory University
Cell Metabolism | Year: 2017

Except in rare cases, obesity tends to be a consequence of both an unhealthy lifestyle and a genetic susceptibility to gain weight. With more than 200 common genetic variants identified, there is a growing interest in developing personalized preventive and treatment strategies to predict an individual's obesity risk. We review the literature on the prediction of obesity and show that models based on the established genetic variants have poorer predictive ability than traditional predictors, such as family history of obesity and childhood obesity. Current findings suggest that opportunities for precision medicine in common obesity may be limited. © 2017


BACKGROUND: Risk scores have been developed to identify men at high risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroconversion. These scores can be used to more efficiently allocate public health prevention resources, such as pre-exposure prophylaxis. However, the published scores were developed with data sets that comprise predominantly white men who have sex with men (MSM) collected several years prior and recruited from a limited geographic area. Thus, it is unclear how well these scores perform in men of different races or ethnicities or men in different geographic regions. METHODS: We assessed the predictive ability of 3 published scores to predict HIV seroconversion in a cohort of black and white MSM in Atlanta, GA. Questionnaire data from the baseline study visit were used to derive individual scores for each participant. We assessed the discriminatory ability of each risk score to predict HIV seroconversion over 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS: The predictive ability of each score was low among all MSM and lower among black men compared to white men. Each score had lower sensitivity to predict seroconversion among black MSM compared to white MSM and low area under the curve values for the receiver operating characteristic curve indicating poor discriminatory ability. CONCLUSIONS: Reliance on the currently available risk scores will result in misclassification of high proportions of MSM, especially black MSM, in terms of HIV risk, leading to missed opportunities for HIV prevention services. © Copyright 2017 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association


Esiashvili N.,Emory University
Seminars in Radiation Oncology | Year: 2017

Eastern Europe is represented by 22 countries of significant variability in population density and degree of economic development. They have been affected by past geopolitical isolation due to their association with the “Soviet Block.” Currently, all Eastern European countries except Slovenia are low- or middle-income level and 10 of them are part of European Union. Health care systems in Central and Eastern Europe have been influenced by the legacy of centralized soviet-era governance; however, most countries, particularly in European Union zone, have gone through health care reforms directed toward modernizing infrastructure and staffing. The level of health financing available through health insurance has increased in the region, although still lags behind the Western European levels. After adjusting for differing population age structures, overall incidence rates in both sexes are lower in Eastern and Central Europe compared with the Northern and Western European countries; however, mortality remains higher. There is an ongoing shortage of oncology services in Eastern Europe, including radiotherapy equipment and personnel. Eastern European radiotherapy field is highly diverse with large differences among countries regarding staffing structure, training, accreditation, and defined roles and responsibilities. The rapid diffusion of technological innovations has been identified as one of the most important factors driving the escalating health care expenses, and the need for better cost-effective solutions applicable to the local health care systems and levels of economic development. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Synthetic biologists rely on semi-synthetic recombinant plasmids, but DNA synthesis is constrained by practical limits on length, accuracy, and sequence composition. Cloned DNA parts can be assembled into longer constructs via subcloning, but conventional methods are labor-intensive. One-pot recombination reactions are more convenient but harder to troubleshoot, and those that depend on PCR to create fragments with compatible ends necessitate re-sequencing. The Tip Snip protocol described here enables the subcloning of an insert from one plasmid polylinker into another without PCR or gel purification steps. Cohesive ends of unwanted restriction fragments are snipped off by additional restriction endonucleases. The resulting short fragments (snippets) are eliminated by hybridization to complementary oligonucleotides (anti-snippets) and subsequent size-selection spin-column chromatography. Unwanted linear donor vectors are ligated to double-stranded oligonucleotides (unlinkers) so that only the desired insert and recipient plasmid form circular DNA capable of transforming bacteria. This new method is compatible with high-throughput processing and automated liquid handling, and because no specialized vectors, reagents, selection schemes, or analytical techniques are required, the barriers to adoption are low. © 2017, Eaton Publishing Company. All rights reserved.


Kwong J.Q.,Emory University
Journal of Physiology | Year: 2017

Ca2+ and mitochondria are inextricably linked to cardiac function and dysfunction. Ca2+ is central to cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stimulates mitochondrial energy production to fuel contraction. Under pathological conditions of dysregulated Ca2+ cycling, mitochondrial Ca2+ overload activates cellular death pathways. Thus, in the cardiomyocyte, the mitochondrial Ca2+ microdomain is where contraction, energy and death collide. A key component of mitochondrial Ca2+ signalling is the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter complex (uniplex), an inner membrane Ca2+ transporter and major pathway of mitochondrial Ca2+ entry. Once known only as the unidentified target for ruthenium red and related compounds, in recent years, the uniplex has evolved into a complex multiprotein assembly. The identification of the molecular constituents of the uniplex has made possible the generation of targeted genetic models to interrogate uniplex function in vivo. This review will summarize our current understanding of the molecular structure of the uniplex, its impact on mitochondrial energetics and cardiac physiology, its contribution to cardiomyocyte death, and its expanding roles in cardiac biology. © 2016 The Physiological Society.


Matthews E.K.,Emory University
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2017

Evidence is accumulating that obesity risks become established early in life. The goal of this systematic review is to assess whether there is evidence that rapid postnatal growth holds different implications for childhood obesity risks for children who experienced different patterns of prenatal growth. We conducted systematic database searches in PubMed and Embase in October 2014 for studies assessing the implications of prenatal and postnatal growth for childhood obesity. The 18 studies meeting inclusion criteria indicated that risks of obesity increased with birthweight; risks of obesity also increased with rapid postnatal growth for children across the birthweight distribution. Fifteen studies indicated that rapid postnatal growth is linearly associated with obesity for children and adolescents of all sizes at birth, with no interaction effect. Three studies reported interaction effects with postnatal growth, conferring additional increased risk of obesity among children and adolescents who were small at birth. Both prenatal and postnatal growth are important risk factors for obesity, and their combined effects should be analyzed further to understand how obesity risks develop early in life.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 1 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2016.258. © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Frog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs. One of these "host defense peptides," courtesy of a colorful tennis-ball-sized frog species (Hydrophylax bahuvistara) from southern India, can destroy many strains of human flu and protect mice against flu infection, researchers report April 18 in the journal Immunity. This peptide is far from becoming an anti-flu drug, but this is the first evidence of its flu-killing ability. It seems to work by binding to a protein that is identical across many influenza strains, and in lab experiments, it was able to neutralize dozens of flu strains, from the 1934 archival viruses up to modern ones. The researchers named the newly identified peptide "urumin," after the urumi, a sword with a flexible blade that snaps and bends like a whip, which comes from the same Indian province, Kerala, as the frog. "Different frogs make different peptides, depending on where their habitat is. You and I make host defense peptides ourselves," said flu specialist and study co-author Joshy Jacob of Emory University. "It's a natural innate immune mediator that all living organisms maintain. We just happened to find one that the frog makes that just happens to be effective against the H1 influenza type." Practically all animals make at least a few anti-microbial host defense peptides as part of their innate immune systems, and researchers are only beginning to catalog them. However, frogs have drawn the most attention as a source of host defense peptides, because it's relatively easy to isolate the peptides from their mucus. Researchers can simply give the frogs a small electric shock or rub a powder on the frogs to make them secrete their defense peptides, which can then be collected. Researchers from the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology in Kerala, India, have been isolating peptides from their local frogs and screening them for potential anti-bacterials, but Jacob wondered if there might also be peptides that neutralize human-infecting viruses. Jacob and his colleagues screened 32 frog defense peptides against an influenza strain and found that 4 of them had flu-busting abilities. "I was almost knocked off my chair," said Jacob. "In the beginning, I thought that when you do drug discovery, you have to go through thousands of drug candidates, even a million, before you get 1 or 2 hits. And here we did 32 peptides, and we had 4 hits." Unfortunately, when the researchers exposed isolated human red blood cells (in a dish) to the flu-buster peptides, three out of the four proved toxic. However, the fourth--urumin--seemed harmless to human cells but lethal to a wide range of flu viruses. Electron microscope images of the virus after exposure to urumin reveal a virus that has been completely dismantled. Jacob's team is still working out the details of the flu-destroying mechanism, but the urumin appears to work by targeting a viral surface protein called hemagluttinin, the H in H1N1. "The virus needs this hemagglutinin to get inside our cells," said Jacob. "What this peptide does is it binds to the hemagglutinin and destabilizes the virus. And then it kills the virus."


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Dr. Abbas Ardehali, a professor of surgery and medicine in the division of cardiothoracic surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been selected a 2017 recipient of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations. Ardehali will receive the award at ceremony on May 13 at historic Ellis Island in New York City. The medals are awarded annually to a group of distinguished U.S. citizens who exemplify a life dedicated to community service. These are individuals who preserve and celebrate the history, traditions and values of their ancestry while exemplifying the values of the American way of life, and who are dedicated to creating a better world. Since it was established in 1986, the Ellis Island Medal has been officially recognized by both Houses of Congress as one of the nation's most prestigious awards. Past recipients have included six U.S. presidents, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, as well as such notables as Frank Sinatra, Lee Iacocca, Quincy Jones, Muhammad Ali, Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel, Louis Zamperini and Rosa Parks. "I was surprised and honored to be informed that I was selected as a 2017 Ellis Island Medal of Honor awardee," said Ardehali. "I really think this recognition is a reflection of the accomplishments that our UCLA heart and lung transplant teams have achieved together." Ardehali serves as director of the UCLA Heart and Lung Transplant program, which was ranked as the largest combined heart and lung transplant program in the United States in 2016 by the United Network of Organ Sharing. Ardehali and his colleagues have been leaders in implementing new technologies to advance the field of heart and lung transplantation and have the depth of experience to take many of the more complex cases that other transplant centers are unable to accept. His professional accomplishments include a role in developing an innovative technology for transporting human heart and lungs in a beating or breathing state. The technology could help to improve clinical outcomes and expand the donor pool of organs to help patients. He also developed and patented a new technology that will improve the care of patients with end-stage lung disease. Ardehali has served as a volunteer on several committees for the United Network for Organ Sharing and several scientific organizations, with leadership positions in the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation, American Society of Transplant Surgeons, American Association of Thoracic Surgery and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Among his many honors and awards, Ardehali received a Resolution of Commendation by the California State Assembly and the the Breath of Life Award from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Ardehali has been a faculty member at UCLA since 1997. He also served as chief of cardiothoracic surgery at West Los Angeles Veterans Hospital from 1998 to 2012. He co-authored a textbook, "Khonsari's Cardiac Surgery: Safeguards and Pitfalls in Operative Technique," published in 2016. He has authored numerous book chapters and more than 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and abstracts. Ardehali has been interviewed by ABC News, the Associated Press, CNN, Fox News, NBC News, CBS News, "The Doctor's Show," and Al Jazeera America. He completed his fellowship in cardiothoracic surgery at UCLA and his internal medicine residency at UC San Francisco. He earned a master's degree in public health at UC Berkeley; a medical degree at Emory University School of Medicine; and both a master's degree in chemical and biochemical engineering and an undergraduate degree in biology and biochemistry, both from Rutgers University. Born in Tehran, Iran, Ardehali moved to the United States when he was in high school. He and his wife, Mitra, who is a practicing dentist, have two daughters, Leila and Sara, currently attending Barnard College and Columbia University.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

Six years ago, a chimpanzee had the bright idea to use moss to soak up water, then drink from it, and seven others soon learned the trick. Three years later, researchers returned to the site to see if the practice had persisted to become part of the local chimp culture. They now report that the technique has continued to spread, and it’s mostly been learned by relatives of the original moss-spongers. This adds to earlier evidence that family ties are the most important routes for culture to spread in animals. After the first report of chimps using moss as a sponge in Budongo Forest, Uganda, researchers rarely saw the behaviour again, and wondered whether chimps still knew how to do it. So they set up an experiment, providing moss and leaves at the clay pit where the chimps had demonstrated the technique before. Then they watched to see whether chimpanzees would use leaves – a more common behaviour – or moss to soak up the mineral-rich water from the pit. Most of the original moss-spongers used moss again during the experiment, and so did another 17 chimps, showing the practice had become more widespread. The researchers wondered what factors influenced which individuals adopted it: were they connected socially, or through families, for instance? This group of chimps has been observed for a long time, so the researchers were able to look through field data to calculate an index of how much time each chimpanzee spent with other individuals. It turned out that this metric wasn’t a good predictor of which chimps would use the moss sponge. Instead, moss-sponging was strongly correlated with having moss-sponging relatives. The chimpanzees didn’t only learn from their parents: it was spread between any family members in either direction. “It’s like the family is the [crucible] where the behaviour is transmitted,” says Thibaud Gruber of the University of Geneva, Switzerland, one of the study authors. But there were also individuals who learned the technique from non-family members. “Once a behaviour has been developed and spread to a few individuals, the majority of transmission will appear in the family, but if you hang out with some tool users, you’re still likely to develop a behaviour by social learning,” says Gruber. “This is a wonderful contribution to the study of animal cultures,” says Andrew Whiten at the University of St Andrews, UK. “The accumulated evidence suggests that chimpanzees pass on scores of different traditions across Africa, but being able to see any of them originate and then spread is very much rarer.” One of few previous studies to record new behaviours emerging and spreading in animal populations involved Japanese macaques on Koshima Island in the 1950s. A young female began washing sand off sweet potatoes in a river before eating them, and her peers soon did the same. Since then, the behaviour has spread from mother to offspring. Moss-sponging seems to be following a similar pattern, says Frans de Waal of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. “Social closeness is most of the time a bias in social learning, so that individuals learn the best from those they hang out with and whose behaviour interests them,” he says. We learn more readily from those we can identify with, and so do animals, he adds. The origins of human culture may lie in the sharing of useful behaviours this way, says Whiten. “What has been revealed in recent studies of cultural practices in all the great apes – chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans – means it would be surprising if humans’ ape ancestors did not show similar behaviour, the foundations of the rich human cultures that have evolved in more recent times.” However, some researchers think moss-sponging chimpanzees and potato-washing macaques aren’t learning by imitation at all, and each one invents the behaviour by itself. “Chimpanzees fail to imitate in controlled experiments, and moss sponging does indeed occur in naive individuals,” says Claudio Tennie at the University of Tübingen, Germany. “Neither this nor the potato washing study – or indeed any other study – shows similar cultures in chimpanzees to our own.” Gruber takes a different point of view. “Chimps are able, to a certain extent, to imitate, although it may not be as fine grained as in humans,” he says. Read more: Chimp social network shows how new ideas catch on; Well-travelled chimps more likely to pick up tools and innovate; Chimp filmed cleaning a corpse’s teeth in a mortuary-like ritual


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The slime that coats the skin of a species of colorful frogs found in southern India may help kill strains of the flu virus. In a new study involving mice, researchers found that certain peptides present in the skin mucus of the Hydrophylax bahuvistara frogs can kill the H1 variety of influenza viruses. Peptides are short chains of amino acids that are known as the building blocks of protein. The skin of frogs secretes peptides that can kill viruses and bacteria. Findings of a new research published in the journal Immunity on April 18 suggest that these peptides could be a potential source of new antiviral and antimicrobial treatments. Such treatments can help when vaccines are not available to deal with new strains of pandemic flu or once currently known flu strains develop resistance to available drugs. Flu comes in several varieties and may evolve into new forms, which is why researchers need to develop new vaccines for a specific type of the virus every flu season. All animals produce at least a few antimicrobial host defense peptides since these are involved in the workings of their immune systems. Frogs, however, are of interest to researchers as a source of these peptides because it is relatively easy to isolate peptides that are found in their mucus. All the researchers need to do is give the amphibians an electric shock. They can also rub a powder on the animals so they would secrete their defense peptides. Jacob and his colleagues looked at 32 frog defense peptides for use against a flu strain and found that four of these had flu-busting abilities. Unfortunately, when they exposed isolated human red blood cells to these peptides, they found that three of the four peptides were toxic. Urumin, one of the peptides present in the frog's mucus, appeared harmless to human cells but was found lethal to a range of flu viruses. Urumin works by targeting the viral surface protein hemagluttinin, the H in H1N1. "The virus needs this hemagglutinin to get inside our cells," said study researcher Joshy Jacob of Emory University. "What this peptide does is it binds to the hemagglutinin and destabilizes the virus. And then it kills the virus." In experiments involving mice, urumin, was found to provide protection to unvaccinated mice. The peptide binds to a protein that is identical across many strains of influenza. Researchers found that the peptide can neutralize dozens of flu strains ranging from the 1934 archival viruses to those that sprung in modern times. Urumin appears to have limitation. The peptide protected mice against a lethal dose of H1 flu strain but it was not found effective against the H3N2. Researchers though remain optimistic of its potentials as a treatment for flu. "Urumin represents a unique class of anti-influenza virucide that specifically targets the hemagglutinin stalk region, similar to targeting of antibodies induced by universal influenza vaccines," Jacob and colleagues wrote in their study. "Urumin therefore has the potential to contribute to first-line anti-viral treatments during influenza outbreaks." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.latimes.com

What’s more amazing than kissing a frog and getting a handsome prince? How about scraping off a bit of the mucus layer that covers his skin and finding in it a potent weapon against influenza? That, quite simply, is what scientists from Emory University appear to have done in discovering an antimicrobial peptide on the skin of Hydrophylax bahuvistara, a species of frog native to southern India. What they found could treat a relentless scourge of humankind that kills as many as half a million people around the world each year. There, in the film of secretions that protects the frog’s skin from deadly pathogens, scientists have identified a string of amino acids that completely destroys a wide swath of influenza A viruses while doing no harm to healthy human red blood cells. This discovery, reported Tuesday in the journal Immunity, will face many hurdles before it can become an actual influenza treatment. But its novelty is a potential source of strength against flu viruses that have begun to develop resistance to existing antiviral medications. Each strain of the flu is named for its particular combination of two surface proteins, hemagglutinin (of which there are 18 known varieties) and neuraminidase (of which there are 11). The most common form of seasonal influenza has the H1 version of hemagglutinin (along with the N1 version of neuraminidase); in laboratory experiments, the frog peptide wiped out every type of H1 flu that was tested. The current version of H1N1 flu came on the scene in 2009 with the H1N1 “swine flu” pandemic that combined viruses from pigs, birds and people. When the virus first emerged, humans had limited immunity against it, but public health measures and good luck conspired to protect us from disaster. Scientists fear that, in the absence of a wide-spectrum weapon against flu, we won’t be so lucky next time a new strain appears. There’s no shape-shifting prince in this story, but there is a sword: the Emory team has dubbed the virus-killing peptide “urumin.” That moniker is derived from the word urumi, the deadly three-pronged ribbon sword used by skilled practitioners of Kerala Kalari Payat, sometimes called the “mother of all martial arts.” Kalari warriors, who would wear this fearsome weapon around their waists, originated from the same province in Southern India that is the native habitat of Hydrophylax bahuvistara. The discovery is a reminder of the value of preserving biodiversity as a source of inspiration for new human drugs. To protect themselves in a soup of potentially dangerous microbes, many plants and animals — including frogs — coat themselves with “host defense peptides.” Those peptides have led to the discovery of many antibiotic agents, which is why researchers from the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology in Kerala, India, have been swabbing the skins of local frogs and screening these samples. The study’s lead author, Emory flu expert Joshy Jacob, wondered if the frog mucus might also contain peptides that could neutralize viruses that attack humans. In what is normally an exhaustive process of sifting, Jacob and his team started by screening 32 peptides against a strain of influenza. To his astonishment, the team immediately found four peptides that attacked influenza. Urumin was the only one that did so without inflicting collateral damage on healthy human cells. After isolating urumin, the researchers sequenced the genome of their find. Then they chemically synthesized it. Testing this agent in human blood samples infected with influenza A virus, they found that it seemed to home in on the hemagglutinin protein. "What this peptide does is it binds to the hemagglutinin and destabilizes the virus,” Jacob said. ”And then it kills the virus." By targeting a protein that is common across many different flu strains, the frog peptide behaved like a universal flu vaccine. Indeed, urumin neutralized dozens of flu strains, ranging from viruses that circulated in 1934 right up to modern ones. It was also effective at destroying H1 influenza A viruses that had developed resistance to antiviral medications. Current drugs used to blunt the attack of many flu viruses target the neuraminidase protein. But these drugs — including zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir and laninamivir — are quickly thwarted when neuraminidase mutates. Urumin was not so easily put off because it focused on the hemagglutinin protein instead. Having effective antiviral medications is especially important when a flu strain emerges before a vaccine can be formulated to protect against it. In these cases, giving drugs to people after they’re infected can make infections milder and shorten the time an infected person is sick. It may even make the virus less likely to spread to others. For Jacob and his team, the next step will be to test urumin in animals of increasing complexity, even as they deepen their understanding of exactly how it works. Exercise can be contagious, new social network analysis finds Why doctors are being urged to join the March for Science on Saturday What would make a computer biased? Learning a language spoken by humans


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Frog mucus might seem like the kind of flu remedy a witch doctor would suggest, but in the future, more respected medical professionals could be prescribing it. Researchers at Emory University have found that certain peptides excreted by frogs can fight off human flu strains, and they could be used as emergency stand-ins during flu outbreaks when regular vaccines aren't available. Made up of short chains of amino acids, peptides are essentially mini-proteins, and they perform a variety of functions in the body. Some peptides are antimicrobial, playing a role in an animal's immune system, and although they generally only benefit the species that's producing them, the Emory team wanted to see if these flu fighters could carry across to humans. "Different frogs make different peptides, depending on where their habitat is," says Joshy Jacob, co-author of the study. "You and I make host defense peptides ourselves. It's a natural innate immune mediator that all living organisms maintain. We just happened to find one that the frog makes that just happens to be effective against the H1 influenza type." For this work, the team collected 32 different peptides from a frog species called Hydrophylax bahuvistara, which is native to southern India. Frogs are a good place to start looking because their peptides are easy to collect and isolate: the researchers simply give them a mild electric shock or rub a powder on their back, and the animals secrete them in defense. The team tested the peptides against human flu strains, and of the 32 types collected, four of them proved effective. That was a much higher number than the researchers were expecting. "I was almost knocked off my chair," says Jacob. "In the beginning, I thought that when you do drug discovery, you have to go through thousands of drug candidates, even a million, before you get one or two hits. And here we did 32 peptides, and we had four hits." But it's not a good idea to just go out licking frogs the next time you get the sniffles – of those four candidates, it appears only one may be safe for human use. In lab tests, the researchers exposed human red blood cells to the different peptides, and using electron microscopy found that three of them were toxic. The fourth, which the team dubbed "urumin," was lethal to the flu but harmless to us. The researchers found that urumin was effective against dozens of flu strains. While the exact mechanism isn't clear yet, it appears that the peptide's tactics involve binding to a protein called hemagluttinin on the surface of the virus. Putting the H in H1, this protein is a key part of how the flu virus grips and attacks healthy human cells. "The virus needs this hemagglutinin to get inside our cells," says Jacob. "What this peptide does is it binds to the hemagglutinin and destabilizes the virus. And then it kills the virus." When tested on mice, urumin administered through the nose was found to protect the animals from lethal doses of some types of flu, like the H1N1 swine flu that struck in 2009, but had little effect against current strains like H3N2. While the peptides probably won't make for vaccines by themselves, they could be used as stop-gaps where vaccines aren't yet available, to help slow the spread of future pandemics. The researchers are now developing ways to keep the peptides stable inside the body, where natural enzymes would work to break them down, and continuing to search for frog peptides that might be effective against other viruses. The research was published in the journal Immunity.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Athens, Ga. - As allergy sufferers can attest, thunderstorm activity can exacerbate asthma and respiratory ailments. In fall 2016, when strong storms moved across southeastern Australia, a major thunderstorm asthma epidemic struck Melbourne and the surrounding area. High grass pollen concentrations dispersed by strong, gusty winds led to multiple deaths and a flood of residents seeking medical attention for respiratory problems. Now, University of Georgia researchers are exploring new ways of predicting thunderstorm asthma outbreaks that may one day provide early warnings for health professionals, emergency management officials and residents in affected areas. The study, published by researchers from UGA and Emory University in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, is one of the first to specifically include well-known aspects of thunderstorm diagnostics often used by meteorologists to assess storm severity. According to the study, the combination of rainfall, winds and lightning from thunderstorms in conjunction with pollen or mold spores can worsen asthma symptoms. Rainfall and high humidity rupture bioaerosols, particularly rye grass pollen grains. Thunderstorm electrical activity contributes further pollen fragmentation, and gusty winds can spread pollen granules ahead of the storm. Several of the factors in combination may result in these events reaching epidemic proportions. "Thunderstorm asthma is a very complex phenomenon and involves interactions of allergens like grass pollens, thunderstorms and susceptible groups of people," said lead author Andrew J. Grundstein, professor of geography in UGA's Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. "Our study may help anticipate significant thunderstorms by employing a technique that helps identify wind magnitudes commonly associated with thunderstorm asthma outbreaks." By cross-referencing several forecast modeling tools, and especially as the modeling accuracy and resolution of the tools improve, the public and emergency service providers can be better prepared for the incidence of thunderstorm asthma events. "While this study does not yet provide the capability of predicting thunderstorm asthma outbreaks, our methodology may provide a key piece to the puzzle for alerting public health officials about what storms may trigger an episode and which ones may not," said co-author Marshall Shepherd, Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor of Geography and Atmospheric Sciences. Other authors on the study include Paul Miller, graduate research assistant in the department of geography at UGA, and Stefanie Sarnat, associate professor of environmental health in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. An online version of the full study is available at http://journals.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A component of the skin mucus secreted by South Indian frogs can kill the H1 variety of influenza viruses, researchers from Emory Vaccine Center and the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology in India have discovered. Frogs' skins were known to secrete "host defense peptides" that defend them against bacteria. The finding, scheduled for publication in Immunity, suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well. Anti-flu peptides could become handy when vaccines are unavailable, in the case of a new pandemic strain, or when circulating strains become resistant to current drugs, says senior author Joshy Jacob, PhD, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Emory Vaccine Center and Emory University School of Medicine. The first author of the paper is graduate student David Holthausen, and the research grew out of collaboration with M.R. Pillai, PhD and Sanil George, PhD from the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology. Jacob and his colleagues named one of the antiviral peptides they identified urumin, after a whip-like sword called "urumi" used in southern India centuries ago. Urumin was found in skin secretions from the Indian frog Hydrophylax bahuvistara, which were collected after mild electrical stimulation. Peptides are short chains of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Some anti-bacterial peptides work by punching holes in cell membranes, and are thus toxic to mammalian cells, but urumin was not. Instead, urumin appears to only disrupt the integrity of flu virus, as seen through electron microscopy. It binds the stalk of hemagglutinin, a less variable region of the flu virus that is also the target of proposed universal vaccines. This specificity could be valuable because current anti-influenza drugs target other parts of the virus, Jacob says. Because flu viruses from humans cannot infect frogs, producing urumin probably confers on frogs an advantage in fighting some other pathogen, he says. Delivered intranasally, urumin protected unvaccinated mice against a lethal dose of some flu viruses. Urumin was specific for H1 strains of flu, such as the 2009 pandemic strain, and was not effective against other current strains such as H3N2. Developing antimicrobial peptides into effective drugs has been a challenge in the past, partly because enzymes in the body can break them down. Jacob's lab is now exploring ways to stabilize antiviral peptides such as urumin, as well as looking for frog-derived peptides that are active against other viruses like dengue and Zika.


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

People affected with brain injuries or impairment often face trouble in recollecting memories and thoughts. A group of neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania conducted an experiment to demonstrate how a pacemaker-like approach, can help reduce brain injury effects and associated problems. The Department of Defense is funding the research and the study is part of a four-year project. The initiative aims to help people affected with traumatic brain injuries or diseases like dementia, to lead a fully functioning normal life. The program has been named Restoring Active Memory. Many previous attempts to enhance brain memory have met with mixed results with some improving the memory, whereas others showing no results at all. However, the latest experiment clarifies this confusion and states that the timing of the brain stimulation plays an important part. "We all have good days and bad days, times when we're foggy, or when we're sharp. We found that jostling the system when it's in a low-functioning state can jump it to a high-functioning one," said Michael Kahana, the lead researcher of the study. To conduct the study, the researchers collected data of 150 patients in collaboration with 20 other scientists hailing from institutions such as Mayo Clinic, Emory University, University of California, and more. "Using recordings from neurosurgical epilepsy patients with intracranially implanted electrodes, we trained multivariate classifiers to discriminate spectral activity during learning that predicted remembering from forgetting, then decoded neural activity in later sessions in which we applied stimulation during learning," noted the researchers. For the experiment, the researchers made the patients memorize a list of words. The participants were given different words each time and asked to freely recall as many as they could from the list. During this study, the scientists tracked some "hot spots" in the participants' brains, which were found to have a strong connection with memory encoding. Before carrying out the stimulation, the researchers specified the basic settings for each patient's high and low functioning brain points. Few participants memorized some of the lists through brain stimulation, whereas the control group learned the words without the help of electrode stimulations. After a thorough statistical analysis, the researchers discovered that during a foggy or low function stage, people scored slightly higher than normal when the brain was stimulated. On the other hand, stimulation given during a high-functioning state yielded worse scores. The researchers shared that the enhancement effect was on an average roughly 12 percent to 13 percent. Moreover, when the brain stimulation occurred "in a good state" the average was roughly 15 percent to 20 percent "worse than usual." "We found that, when electrical stimulation arrives during periods of effective memory, memory worsens. But when the electrical stimulation arrives at times of poor function, memory is significantly improved," asserted Kahana. It was concluded that during low functioning state, with the help of brain stimulations, individuals could memorize the words better when compared to stimulations received during a high functioning state. The researchers are optimistic that such methods may possibly aid in decreasing dementia signs, as well as aid in combating memory loss due to head or brain injuries. However, more research needs to be conducted before the brain stimulation approach can be applied. The study has been published in the journal Current Biology. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | March 24, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

A doctor from the Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia, believes he has found a potential cure for sepsis - a common and often fatal disease - in the unlikeliest place: the ordinary vitamin C. Dr. Paul Marik says he already treated roughly 150 patients, of which only one succumbed to sepsis. His remedy includes an infusion of vitamin C, along with low doses of hydrocortisone and thiamine (or vitamin B1). After administering his experimental treatment to 47 of his patients, Marik recorded the results in a paper, featured in the online edition of the journal Chest. According to his study, only four of those patients died in the hospital - because of underlying diseases, not sepsis - as opposed to 19, from an equally numbered group of patients treated before he started using the new remedy. Sepsis is an autoimmune disease caused by an overwhelming immune response to infection, and arises when chemicals released by the immune system to fight the infection trigger widespread inflammation throughout the body. This reaction produces blood clots and ruptured blood vessels, leading to impaired blood flow and poor circulation of nutrients and oxygen to the major organs. In severe cases, sepsis can cause organ failure and septic shock. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, sepsis is typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus, and E.coli infections. Common symptoms of sepsis resemble other conditions, making it difficult to diagnose in its initial stages, and include fever, chills, rapid breathing and heart rate, rash, confusion, and disorientation. The National Institute of General Medical Sciences reports this severe condition affects more than a million Americans annually, claiming the lives of 28 to 50 percent of them. What makes vitamin C so potent in treating inflammation is the antioxidant's capacity to influence the immune response when it is administered intravenously, as opposed to oral tablets. Marik describes his first patient case treated with the vitamin C infusion two years ago as extremely severe and in desperate need of a creative approach. The patient, a 48-year-old woman, was on the brink of death, suffering from multiple organ failure. Inspired by a previous study from researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, which reported a moderate success of intravenous vitamin C as therapy for sepsis, Marik decided to adapt the treatment. He came up with his own version by adding a mixture of thiamine and corticosteroids - linked in prior research to the treatment of sepsis and septic shock. His remedy managed to save his patient's life and therefore Marik continued to successfully administer it in the following sepsis cases he encountered. The medical community received Marik's study with cautious optimism, since his research didn't follow the standard protocol for assessing potential new treatments. The required procedure involves a randomized double-blind placebo control study, which is yet to be undertaken. Hundreds of other attempts to find an effective treatment for sepsis have been met with failure in follow-up research. Nevertheless, Dr. Craig Coopersmith, from Emory University School of Medicine, believes these results could mean a very important breakthrough pending corroboration, especially considering the high mortality rate associated with sepsis. "If it turns out in further studies that this is true, and we can validate it, then this will be an unbelievably huge deal," he says. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A team of neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania has shown for the first time that electrical stimulation delivered when memory is predicted to fail can improve memory function in the human brain. That same stimulation generally becomes disruptive when electrical pulses arrive during periods of effective memory function. The research team included Michael Kahana, professor of psychology and principal investigator of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Restoring Active Memory program; Youssef Ezzyat, a senior data scientist in Kahana's lab; and Daniel Rizzuto, director of cognitive neuromodulation at Penn. They published their findings in the journal Current Biology. This work is an important step toward the long-term goal of Restoring Active Memory, a four-year Department of Defense project aimed at developing next-generation technologies that improve memory function in people who suffer from memory loss. It illustrates an important link between appropriately timed deep-brain stimulation and its potential therapeutic benefits. To get to this point, the Penn team first had to understand and decode signaling patterns that correspond to highs and lows of memory function. "By applying machine-learning methods to electrical signals measured at widespread locations throughout the human brain," said Ezzyat, lead paper author, "we are able to identify neural activity that indicates when a given patient will have lapses of memory encoding." Using this model, Kahana's team examined how the effects of stimulation differ during poor versus effective memory function. The study involved neurosurgical patients receiving treatment for epilepsy at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, the Emory University Hospital, the University of Texas Southwestern, the Mayo Clinic, Columbia University, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center and the University of Washington. Participants were asked to study and recall lists of common words while receiving safe levels of brain stimulation. During this process, the Penn team recorded electrical activity from electrodes implanted in the patients' brains as part of routine clinical care. These recordings identified the biomarkers of successful memory function, activity patterns that occur when the brain effectively creates new memories. "We found that, when electrical stimulation arrives during periods of effective memory, memory worsens," Kahana said. "But when the electrical stimulation arrives at times of poor function, memory is significantly improved." Kahana likens it to traffic patterns in the brain: stimulating the brain during a backup restores the normal flow of traffic. Gaining insight into this process could improve the lives of many types of patients, particularly those with traumatic brain injury or neurological diseases, such Alzheimer's. "Technology based on this type of stimulation," Rizzuto said, "could produce meaningful gains in memory performance, but more work is needed to move from proof-of-concept to an actual therapeutic platform." This past November, the RAM team publicly released an extensive intracranial brain recording and stimulation dataset that included more than 1,000 hours of data from 150 patients performing memory tasks.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

MATAWAN, NJ--(Marketwired - April 26, 2017) - iCIMS, Inc., a leading provider of cloud-based talent acquisition solutions, announced today the company has increased its enterprise market footprint. To support its growing enterprise customer base, iCIMS has made several strategic investments in IT infrastructure, product development and scalability, including the addition of a European Union data center to serve its global customer base. To better address high volume hiring needs, iCIMS launched ground-breaking Streaming API technology into its Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) framework, UNIFi, earlier this month. This strategic advancement underscores the company's stance as a provider that both prioritizes talent acquisition and understands the complexities of enterprise businesses. Recently, brands such as Emory University, Exide Technologies, Fresh Thyme Farmers Market, Smashburger, and Unity Point Health chose iCIMS to drive their talent acquisition programs forward. These recent additions join hundreds of other enterprise businesses who have chosen the iCIMS talent acquisition platform over payroll and Enterprise Resource Planning solutions (ERPs) that offer limited recruitment capabilities. "ERPs simply lack the functionality enterprise size organizations need to drive progressive talent acquisition programs," said iCIMS Chief Customer Officer, Adam Feigenbaum. "iCIMS recognizes that talent acquisition is a strategic function and we're dedicated to providing software that prioritizes talent acquisition while also elegantly integrating with an employee system of record. Enterprise businesses are positively responding to this value proposition and are increasingly looking to iCIMS to address their needs," concluded Feigenbaum. "Right now, we have 15,000 employees under our different brands," said Leonard Qualtiere, Senior Specialist, Human Resource Operations at Sunoco. "We chose iCIMS because the company and product were robust enough to our handle high volume hiring needs. Since implementing iCIMS in two languages, we immediately saw a reduction in the time it previously took to hire employees and get them onboarded. On top of that, we connected iCIMS with additional HR software providers, streamlining the user experience for tasks like compensation, credits, and I9/e-verification. Taking advantage of iCIMS' PaaS framework has reduced our recruitment costs while providing a better, well rounded experience for candidates, new hires and recruiters alike." Cited as a leader in G2 Crowd's winter report for enterprise organizations and as a strong fit for global enterprise organizations in Aptitude Research Partners Recruitment Marketing 2017 report, iCIMS is attracting enterprise businesses that prioritize talent acquisition. "iCIMS has continued to demonstrate a strong customer experience and a comprehensive suite of solutions," said Madeline Laurano, co-founder of Aptitude Research. "The company is well-positioned to support enterprise customers who are looking to reach more job seekers and make better hiring decisions." Visit our virtual trophy case for all of iCIMS' recent company, solution, and service awards. iCIMS is the leading provider of talent acquisition solutions that help businesses win the war for top talent. iCIMS empowers companies to manage their entire hiring process within the industry's most robust Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS). Built on the foundation of a best-to-market talent acquisition software suite, iCIMS' PaaS framework, UNIFi, allows employers to expand the capabilities of their core talent acquisition technology by integrating with the largest partner ecosystem in talent acquisition to help them attract, find, screen, and manage candidates. Offering scalable, easy-to-use solutions that are backed by award-winning customer service, iCIMS supports more than 3,500 contracted customers and is one of the largest and fastest-growing talent acquisition solution providers.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this March 31, 2017 file photo, a portrait of former President Andrew Jackson hangs on the wall behind President Donald Trump, accompanied by Vice President Mike Pence, in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington. President Donald Trump made puzzling claims about Andrew Jackson and the Civil War in an interview, suggesting that he was uncertain about the origin of the conflict while claiming that Jackson was upset about the war that started more than a decade after his death. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File) ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — President Donald Trump suggested in an interview that he is unclear about the origins of the Civil War, that President Andrew Jackson (who died 16 years before the war) could have prevented the conflict and that it was possible to have settled it without bloodshed. "Could that one not have been worked out?" Trump asked in the interview with The Washington Examiner. AP talked to some of the most distinguished experts on what was really behind the war that tore the nation asunder. WHY DID THE CIVIL WAR START? The issues leading up to the Civil War were complex, and many people in the North and South in 1861 viewed the conflict as inevitable. In the South, slave labor was the foundation of an economy based on the cotton produced by plantations and farms. The free labor also was key to profiting from the production of such cash crops as tobacco, corn and other staples of the South. In the North, farms were generally smaller because of the soil and climate. With their more industrialized economy, the Northern states didn't require large numbers of slaves. By the 1850s, the North vs. South divide was widening as free states and slave states debated over allowing slavery in new territories as the nation expanded westward. Southerners viewed the North's opposition to slavery's expansion as a threat to the economies — and thus the political power and rights — of slave-holding states. Abraham Lincoln, opposed to slavery's expansion, was elected president in 1860 and the path to the South's seceding from the Union was set. "Slavery was the root cause of the Civil War," said Eric Foner, professor of history at Columbia University. "It was not the only cause, but it was the underlying cause. There was a fundamental difference between the North and the South as the South feared for the future of slavery." COULD IT HAVE BEEN AVOIDED? Probably not, according to James Roark, an author and retired history professor at Emory University in Atlanta. "As it got tangled with American politics and regional interests, nobody could figure out a way to save both the Union and preserve slavery in the South," he said. "It wasn't for a lack of talking. There was plenty of talking." WHAT WOULD ANDREW JACKSON DO? (OR HAVE DONE, IF HE LIVED THAT LONG?) Probably not much. "Even Andrew Jackson, were he alive, could not have threatened the use of force that perhaps Trump thinks would have solved the problem," Foner said. Jackson, who died in 1845, was a slave-holding plantation owner. "The Civil War was caused by slavery; it wasn't caused by the absence of Andrew Jackson to help the American government," said Harold Holzer, a New York-based scholar who is an expert on the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln. HOW WAS THE WAR RESOLVED? After four years and more than 600,000 soldiers dead, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered on April 9, 1865, at the village of Appomattox Court House in Virginia. Associated Press reporters Russ Bynum in Savannah, Georgia, and Jonathan Lemire in New York contributed to this report. Historians of the American Civil War point to complex issues when reflecting on President Donald Trump's remark that the conflict might have been settled without bloodshed. Trump asked in an interview with The Washington Examiner: "Could that one not have been worked out?" A professor of history at Columbia University, Eric Foner, notes that slavery was a root cause of the war and that the South feared for the future of slavery. A retired history professor at Emory University in Atlanta, James Roark, says war probably couldn't have been avoided in 1861. Roark says, "Nobody could figure out a way to save both the Union and preserve slavery in the South." More than 600,000 soldiers had died by the time the war ended in 1865.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Frog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs. One of these "host defense peptides," courtesy of a colorful tennis-ball-sized frog species (Hydrophylax bahuvistara) from southern India, can destroy many strains of human flu and protect mice against flu infection, researchers report April 18 in the journal Immunity. This peptide is far from becoming an anti-flu drug, but this is the first evidence of its flu-killing ability. It seems to work by binding to a protein that is identical across many influenza strains, and in lab experiments, it was able to neutralize dozens of flu strains, from the 1934 archival viruses up to modern ones. The researchers named the newly identified peptide "urumin," after the urumi, a sword with a flexible blade that snaps and bends like a whip, which comes from the same Indian province, Kerala, as the frog. "Different frogs make different peptides, depending on where their habitat is. You and I make host defense peptides ourselves," said flu specialist and study co-author Joshy Jacob of Emory University. "It's a natural innate immune mediator that all living organisms maintain. We just happened to find one that the frog makes that just happens to be effective against the H1 influenza type." Practically all animals make at least a few anti-microbial host defense peptides as part of their innate immune systems, and researchers are only beginning to catalog them. However, frogs have drawn the most attention as a source of host defense peptides, because it's relatively easy to isolate the peptides from their mucus. Researchers can simply give the frogs a small electric shock or rub a powder on the frogs to make them secrete their defense peptides, which can then be collected. Researchers from the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology in Kerala, India, have been isolating peptides from their local frogs and screening them for potential anti-bacterials, but Jacob wondered if there might also be peptides that neutralize human-infecting viruses. Jacob and his colleagues screened 32 frog defense peptides against an influenza strain and found that 4 of them had flu-busting abilities. "I was almost knocked off my chair," said Jacob. "In the beginning, I thought that when you do drug discovery, you have to go through thousands of drug candidates, even a million, before you get 1 or 2 hits. And here we did 32 peptides, and we had 4 hits." Unfortunately, when the researchers exposed isolated human red blood cells (in a dish) to the flu-buster peptides, three out of the four proved toxic. However, the fourth—urumin—seemed harmless to human cells but lethal to a wide range of flu viruses. Electron microscope images of the virus after exposure to urumin reveal a virus that has been completely dismantled. Jacob's team is still working out the details of the flu-destroying mechanism, but the urumin appears to work by targeting a viral surface protein called hemagluttinin, the H in H1N1. "The virus needs this hemagglutinin to get inside our cells," said Jacob. "What this peptide does is it binds to the hemagglutinin and destabilizes the virus. And then it kills the virus."


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

A component of the skin mucus secreted by certain South Indian frogs can kill the H1 variety of influenza viruses, say researchers. Frogs’ skins are known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. The findings of a new study suggest that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery, too. Anti-flu peptides could come in handy when vaccines are unavailable—in the case of a new pandemic strain, or when circulating strains become resistant to current drugs, says senior author Joshy Jacob, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Emory Vaccine Center and Emory University School of Medicine. Scientists named one of the antiviral peptides they identified urumin, after a whip-like sword called “urumi” used in southern India centuries ago. Urumin was found in skin secretions from the Indian frog Hydrophylax bahuvistara, which were collected after mild electrical stimulation. Peptides are short chains of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Some antibacterial peptides work by punching holes in cell membranes, and are thus toxic to mammalian cells. Some antiviral peptides from the frogs were toxic in this way, but urumin wasn’t. Instead, it appears to only disrupt the integrity of flu virus, as seen through electron microscopy. “I was almost knocked off my chair,” Jacob says. “In the beginning, I thought that when you do drug discovery, you have to go through thousands of drug candidates, even a million, before you get 1 or 2 hits. And here we did 32 peptides, and we had 4 hits.” It turns out that urumin binds the stalk of hemagglutinin, a less variable region of the flu virus that is also the target of proposed universal vaccines. This specificity could be valuable because current anti-influenza drugs target other parts of the virus, Jacob says. Because flu viruses from humans cannot infect frogs, producing urumin probably confers on frogs an advantage in fighting some other pathogen, Jacob says. Delivered intranasally, urumin protected unvaccinated mice against a lethal dose of some flu viruses. Urumin was specific for H1 strains of flu, such as the 2009 pandemic strain, and was not effective against other current strains such as H3N2. Developing antimicrobial peptides into effective drugs has been a challenge in the past, partly because enzymes in the body can break them down. Jacob’s lab is now exploring ways to stabilize antiviral peptides such as urumin, as well as looking for frog-derived peptides that are active against other viruses like dengue and Zika. The paper appears in the journal Immunity. The first author is graduate student David Holthausen, and the research grew out of a collaboration with M.R. Pillai and Sanil George of the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology. Emory University and the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs funded the work.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In lung cancer patients who were taking immunotherapy drugs targeting the PD-1 pathway, testing for CD8 T cell activation in their blood partially predicted whether their tumors would shrink. The results are scheduled for publication in PNAS. Drugs targeting PD-1 or its ligand PD-L1 re-activate "exhausted" CD8 T cells by promoting their expansion and unleashing their ability to destroy cancer cells. Researchers at Emory Vaccine Center, led by co-senior author Rafi Ahmed, PhD, have been intensively studying the cells that are revived after inhibitory signals from PD-1 are blocked. Ahmed is director of the Vaccine Center and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. Winship Cancer Institute investigators Rathi Pillai, MD and Suresh Ramalingam, MD, Winship's deputy director, teamed up with Alice Kamphorst, PhD and Ahmed's group to examine blood samples from 29 advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing immunotherapy treatment. The patients were being treated at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University with drugs blocking the PD-1 pathway, known as checkpoint inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab or atezolizumab). Blood samples were obtained before starting treatment and before each new treatment cycle, which lasted two to three weeks. Most patients (70 percent) displayed an increase in the number of proliferating CD8 T cells in their blood after starting PD-1 targeted treatment -- an observable effect on the immune system. However, not all patients with an immunological response experienced a "partial clinical response", meaning that their tumors shrank by at least 30 percent. All patients with partial responses survived at least one year, while just one out of seven patients with progressive disease was reported to survive one year. Survival times for three patients were not available. An early increase in activated PD-1+ CD8 T cells appears important. 80 percent of patients with clinical benefit exhibited PD-1+ CD8 T cell responses within 4 weeks of treatment initiation. In contrast, 70 percent of patients with disease progression had either delayed or absent PD-1+ CD8 T cell responses. "We hypothesize that re-activated CD8 T cells first proliferate in the lymph nodes, then transition through the blood and migrate to the inflamed tissue," Ahmed says. "We believe some of the activated T cells in patients' blood may be on their way to the tumor." Proliferating CD8 T cells displayed high levels of PD-1, as well as other molecules that influence their activity, which may be targets for combination therapies. The Emory/Winship team recently published a paper in Science, incorporating data from this study, showing that the costimulatory molecule CD28 is required for proliferation following PD-1-targeted treatment. The current study supports a straightforward idea: if CD8 T cells appear to respond to immunotherapy, that's a good sign. "Our ability to detect proliferating T cells in the blood and correlate this with clinical benefit is exciting since this captures a real-time assessment of the immune system's response to PD-1 directed therapies and is a readily accessible test from our patients' perspective," Pillai says. While looking for activated T cells in the blood is not yet predictive enough for routine clinical use, such tests could provide timely information, says co-senior author Ramalingam. Monitoring the immune response could potentially help oncologists and patients decide, within just a few weeks of starting immunotherapy drugs, whether to continue with current treatment or combine it with something else. "We are already doing larger studies to confirm these observations and extend them to other cancers beyond lung cancer," he says. This work was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the T. J. Martell Foundation.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff speaks to volunteers and supporters at a campaign office as he runs for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District on April 18, 2017 in Marietta, Georgia. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) ATLANTA —Democrat Jon Ossoff handily won the most votes in a crowded field in the suburban Atlanta 6th Congressional District special election Tuesday, but was unable to muster enough votes to avoid a runoff election against a Republican. “This is already a victory for the ages,” Ossoff said close to midnight after taking the stage in Dunwoody to shouts of “Flip the Sixth!” from supporters. “We have defied the odds. We have shattered expectations.” “We will be ready to fight on and win in June … and there is no amount of dark money super pac negative advertising that can overcome real grassroots activism. So bring it on.” With 84 percent of the ballots counted, Ossoff was leading with 48.6 percent of the vote. In a contest that has drawn national attention as an early test of Democratic efforts to challenge President Trump, Ossoff needed to top 50 percent of the vote against 17 opponents to be able to claim the seat vacated by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, and help Democrats achieve their goal of retaking the House of Representatives in 2018. Trump, who had infused himself into the race with a series of tweets made in its closing days, breathed a sigh of relief that Ossoff now found himself in a runoff election in a traditionally red state. “Despite major outside money, FAKE media support and eleven Republican candidates, BIG “R” win with runoff in Georgia. Glad to be of help!” the president tweeted late Tuesday. As early results came in, Ossoff drew the highest vote count of his competitors in the open primary to replace Price. With 16 percent of ballots yet to be counted, Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel led the Republican pack with 19.5 percent of the vote and Republican Bob Gray followed with 10.4 percent. “You’re looking at the top Republican vote getter. Now that’s how you celebrate a birthday,” Handel told her supporters Tuesday, the night she turned 55, as the contest appeared likely to head to a run-off. “Tomorrow, the campaign starts anew.” Should final results show Ossoff with under 50 percent of the vote, he and Handel will face each other in a head-to-head general election contest on June 20, which she is favored to win on the strength of the divided Republican primary field coming together to back their party’s candidate. “We are going to rally behind Karen Handel,” Gray, who appeared poised for a third place finish, tweeted Tuesday night. “We wish her Godspeed.” Polls taken before the hotly contested race showed Ossoff winning no more than 43 percent of the vote over his 11 Republican and four Democratic competitors. An outright win Tuesday was the improbable goal he’d set for the campaign — and represented his best chance of victory in the district. “The campaign’s goal is not to get into a runoff, though we’ll be ready to fight a runoff if necessary,” Ossoff said in early April. “The campaign’s goal is to win this election outright on April 18.” On Tuesday morning, Osoff said the campaign was within “striking distance” of that goal, thanks to a surge in early voter turnout. Democrats vowed to press on should a runoff be required. “Today was a great day. We saw what looks like pretty high expected turnout. And just could not be happier and more impressed with the community leaders who came out not just today but for the past months and built this special movement,” Ossoff campaign manager Keenan Pontini told Yahoo News, in the waning hours of voting. Two poll locations extended their hours to accommodate the crush of voters. Ossoff’s early performance was a dramatic improvement over the Democrat who ran against Price in the fall. Price beat Democrat Rodney Stooksbury in November 61.7 percent to 32.3 percent. Ossoff’s ability to penetrate a GOP stronghold comes on the heels of the Kansas special election last week, in which populist progressive James Thompson fell short in a ruby-red district against Republican Ron Estes, but nonetheless demonstrated the power of the new anti-Trump organizing movement and its enthusiasm for fresh Democratic faces. Thompson gained 15 points over the previous Democrat to run in the district. A 30-year-old political progressive, documentary filmmaker and one-time Capitol Hill staffer making his first bid for office — and one who does not even reside in the district he’s seeking to represent — would have been an unlikely candidate in any other year to represent this solidly Republican district in the South. But the boyish Ossoff was buoyed by a wave of national Democratic attention and grassroots enthusiasm as the earliest and most aggressive target of efforts to flip the House of Representatives in 2018. The Daily Kos digital political community provided early support for his efforts, ultimately raising nearly $1.5 million for Ossoff from 115,185 donations over the course of the race. And Ossoff’s youth was seen as a plus, according to supporters. “The reason people of other ages are excited about Jon is that he is younger. There’s a lot of talk about ‘Well, he’s only 30 years old.’ Give me a well-educated caring 30-year-old person who is geared up to get things done than these tired old people who have been around in office for a long time and have just been sitting and obstructing. I’ll take him any day,” said Libby Howze, 72, a self-described master gardener from Tucker, in the 6th Congressional District, and an Ossoff volunteer. “It’s time for us to get some young guys. It’s time for us to get millennials and new ideas in Washington, D.C.,” said Mario Avery, mayor of Fairburn, Ga., at the Ossoff Election Night event. Ossoff electrified national Democrats with a message of anti-Trump resistance, running on a platform of “Make Trump Furious,” and pulled in a record $8.3 million by the end of the first quarter of the year, mostly in small donations and with more than 90 percent of the money coming from out of state. Candidates in contests like the GA-06 primary normally raise only $10,000 or so. “I think his energy and his perspective is refreshing in a way that hasn’t been seen in politics and his campaign didn’t involve the divisiveness of the larger election. I think that was refreshing,” said Joseph Dingle, 30, a first-time campaign volunteer canvasser from Atlanta, explaining the outpouring of support. While the district that once sent Newt Gingrich to Washington has been Republican-held since the late 1970s, President Trump performed poorly there in 2016, besting Hillary Clinton by only 1.5 percent. In addition to his unprecedented war chest, Ossoff had a deep well of skilled presidential campaign organizers to draw from as staff and volunteers, thanks to the race being the first competitive contest since the recently concluded presidential campaigns. And he had the support of more than 10,000 volunteers — both from around the country and from an array of vibrant local Trump-era resistance groups. There are 19 different Indivisible Groups in the 6th district, Indivisible’s national policy manager Gonzalo Martinez de Vedia told Yahoo News outside the Chamblee field office for the campaign, one of its two strongholds. In addition to those groups, Indivisible teams from Maryland, New York and Tennessee had gone to Georgia to turn out the vote and canvass for Ossoff. Also active on the ground was a group called Pave It Blue, the newly formed Liberal Moms of Rosswell Cobb, and Indivisible Georgia’s Sixth. A 501(c)(4) group called Better Georgia solicited funds to dot the district with lawn signs and to send mailers to residents featuring the cheeky slogan, “Vote Your Ossoff.” Republican candidate for Georgia’s Sixth Congressional seat Karen Handel, left, is presented with a cake as her birthday is celebrated at an election night watch party in Roswell, Ga., Tuesday, April 18, 2017. (Photo: David Goldman/AP) Once the race became national news, Ossoff faced concerted resistance from Republicans. The National Republican Campaign Committee had been on the air for weeks with ads saying Ossoff does not live in the district. He grew up there, and now lives just outside its boundaries with his girlfriend, who is a medical student at Emory University. Ossoff said on CNN Tuesday morning he plans to move into the district as soon as is practicable. Ossoff has been accused of ties to terrorism because of his documentary work for the Qatar-funded TV channel Al Jazeera. Others sought to portray him as a “30-year-old frat boy” and revived images of him dressed as Han Solo during a college costume party. Donald Trump recorded a robocall that went out to area households Monday night, and tweeted six times about him. The GOP side of the field was split, with the Club for Growth backing Bob Gray against Handel and the a dark money group called the 45 Committee, seeking to shore up support for her. Americans families defending pot as never before, Yahoo News/Marist Poll finds Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ lawyer says he is just playing a role Photos: Mark Zuckerberg speaks at the Facebook F8 developer conference and more: April 18 in photosRoll


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A recent survey of over 2,000 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer found that half of those who undergo bilateral mastectomy after genetic testing don't actually have mutations known to confer increased risk of additional cancers, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and four other U.S. medical centers. Instead the women had what are known as variants of uncertain significance, or VUS, that are often eventually found to be harmless. A bilateral mastectomy is a surgical procedure in which both of a woman's breasts are removed after a diagnosis of cancer in one breast. The finding highlights the need for genetic counselors to help both patients and physicians better understand the results of genetic testing intended to determine a woman's risk for cancer recurrence or for developing a separate cancer in her ovaries or unaffected breast. "Our findings suggest a limited understanding among physicians and patients of the meaning of genetic testing results," said Allison Kurian, MD, associate professor of medicine and of health research and policy at Stanford. "Clinical practice guidelines state that variants of uncertain significance should not be considered to confer high cancer risk, and that patients with these variants should be counseled similarly to a patient whose genetic test is normal. However, many of the physicians surveyed in our study stated that they manage these patients in the same way as they do patients with mutations known to increase a woman's risk." Only about half of the surveyed women who received genetic testing ever discussed their test results with a genetic counselor, and between one-quarter and one-half of the surveyed breast cancer surgeons indicated they treat women with VUS no differently than women with known cancer-associated mutations, the researchers found. Furthermore, some women undergo surgery prior to receiving genetic testing or seeing the results. Kurian is the lead author of the study, which will be published online April 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. University of Michigan researchers Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, and Steven Katz, MD, MPH, share senior authorship. The findings come on the heels of a February study by many of the same researchers showing that physicians often fail to recommend genetic testing for breast cancer patients at high risk for mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, which are strongly associated with ovarian and other cancers. In this study, the researchers asked 2,502 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer whether they had received genetic testing, and if so, whether the testing and any discussion of results occurred before or after breast surgery. They found that of the 666 women who had received testing, 59 percent were considered to have a high risk of a dangerous mutation in a cancer-associated gene. About one-quarter of these women had genetic testing only after surgery -- meaning critical decisions were made about their care before information about their mutation status was available. Delays in testing were particularly pronounced in women who lacked private health insurance. The researchers then polled the surgeons who treated the women in the survey. They found that, when compared with doctors who had treated 51 or more newly diagnosed breast cancer patients during the previous year, doctors who had treated fewer than 21 breast cancer patients were: less confident in discussing the results of genetic testing with patients, more likely to order the genetic test without referring women to a genetic counselor, less likely to delay surgery in order to have test results available for surgical decision-making and more likely to manage a patient with variants of uncertain significance in the same way they would manage patients with proven high-risk mutations in cancer-associated genes. "Our findings suggest that we are not maximizing the benefit of genetic testing for our patients with breast cancer because of barriers related to timeliness of testing and lack of expertise necessary to incorporate results into treatment decisions," said Katz, who is a professor of medicine and of health management and policy at the University of Michigan. Although genetic testing has become more common and less costly, it's also become more confusing. The advent of multiplex gene panels that simultaneously test for mutations or variations in many different genes can render results that are difficult to interpret without the help of a trained genetic counselor. Uncertainties as to the meaning of test results may lead less-experienced surgeons to recommend aggressive treatment in the form of bilateral mastectomies, or cause women to opt for what they may feel is the safest option to manage their cancer. Conversely, high-risk women who do carry dangerous mutations need this information to make informed decisions about their health care choices. "The gaps identified in this study are striking," said Jagsi, professor and deputy chair of radiation oncology at the University of Michigan. "It is critical to ensure that patients at high risk for known cancer-associated mutations are fully informed of the potential benefits of genetic testing, and counseled accurately about the meaning of test results." "We're learning that clinicians' knowledge of breast cancer genetics can be highly variable," said Kurian, who is a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute. "It's important for women at high risk of carrying a dangerous mutation to see someone with expertise in cancer genetics when planning their care. Unfortunately, in many cases genetic counselors may not be optimally integrated into the care of newly diagnosed cancer patients, making it difficult to rapidly triage these patients. Our study highlights the urgent need for improved patient access to cancer genetics experts, particularly genetic counselors, and for educating physicians about the appropriate use of genetic testing and interpretation of test results." Researchers from the University of Southern California, Emory University and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center also contributed to the study. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant P01CA163233), the California Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Kurian has received research funding from Invitae, Myriad Genetics, Ambry Genetics, GenDx and Genomic Health. Stanford's departments of Medicine and of Health Research and Policy also supported the work. The Stanford University School of Medicine consistently ranks among the nation's top medical schools, integrating research, medical education, patient care and community service. For more news about the school, please visit http://med. . The medical school is part of Stanford Medicine, which includes Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children's Health. For information about all three, please visit http://med. .


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.sciencemag.org

In the infectious disease world, the liver-damaging hepatitis C virus (HCV) long has lived in the shadows of killers such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. But curative—and expensive—HCV drugs that have come to market over the past 5 years have focused new attention on the deadly disease. Now, for the first time, researchers have mapped its U.S. prevalence state-by-state. They hope their model ultimately will help improve targeting of efforts to screen for the virus and treat the more than 3 million people in the country who are living with the infection. The new study finds that the highest levels of HCV infection in 2010 were in the western United States. At the same time, eight states—California, Texas, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Ohio, and Washington—account for more than half the cases. HCV is spread primarily when people who inject drugs share their needles and syringes. The work, published in today, was conducted by researchers from Emory University and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, both in Atlanta. The findings weave together population data from what’s known as the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and death records and numbers from the U.S. Census. A new, interactive map created by the group, HepVu, shows the geographic distribution. But the researchers say it underestimates actual HCV prevalence. That’s in part because the study looks only at the noninstitutionalized population, which means it does not include people in prison or those living on the streets. It also does not capture sharp, recent spikes in viral spread because of the country’s opioid epidemic: Reported cases of “acute” HCV infections—which indicate recent transmission—jumped 158% between 2010 and 2014. Emory epidemiologist Patrick Sullivan, whose team earlier created a popular interactive map called AIDSVu, discussed the new work with Insider. The interview has been edited for clarity and brevity. Q: Why are you turning to HCV now? A: It’s especially timely to take a deeper look at hepatitis C, which since 2012 has led to more deaths in the U.S. than the combined number from 20 other diseases in the country, including HIV and pneumococcal pneumonia. There’s also been an update to the national Viral Hepatitis Action Plan, which spells out the challenges to improving our national response. We need more information about geographic distribution of viral hepatitis. One of the underlying issues is that the surveillance systems for hepatitis C are not as robust as they are for diseases like HIV, which are nationally reportable case by case. Q: Why does your report focus on the presence of antibody to the virus? A global hepatitis report issued by the World Health Organization just last week shifted to measures of actual viral levels of HCV rather than antibody, in part because some people with antibody have spontaneously cleared their infections. A: From a public health perspective, antibody indicates the scope of people who need to be engaged. The 10% to 20% of people who have antibody but are not currently infected still need that initial screening. Q: You estimate that at most 3.9 million people in the United States have HCV antibodies. How many of those people do you think actually are infected and need treatment? A: Some 2.7 million are estimated to be living with chronic hepatitis C infection. However, the NHANES estimates of antibody prevalence and chronic infection do not include people who are institutionalized or homeless. Studies that are more inclusive of other populations suggest there are 3.5 million people in the United States who are currently infected. Q: How do you think this information will help target responses? A: As we find with AIDSVu, part of this is helping people understand the epidemic where they live. There’s low awareness among health care providers in some places. It may also lead some people to realize that hepatitis C is a problem in their state, and then seek testing or accept screening if it’s offered. It also gives states a benchmark of the public health challenge they are facing. Q: What places were you surprised to find had high levels of hepatitis C? A: Tennessee, Oregon, and Oklahoma. They’re also not states that have had the most robust data. Q: Some states and locales make it more difficult for drug users to obtain clean needles. Have you done an overlay of a map that combines this information with your own data? A: We have not, but that’s exactly the kind of question we hope our map will lead people to ask. When you start mapping things, people start having ideas about what they’d like to see mashed up with it. We hope people begin to interrogate the data and ask what’s related.


As the special election for a Georgia congressional seat that attracted so much national attention this week heads into a runoff,  President Trump further inserted himself into the race, a move welcomed by the Republican candidate. Trump called former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel on Wednesday morning, congratulating her on making it to the runoff with Democrat Jon Ossoff. The field was crowded with nearly a dozen Republican candidates, but Handel was the highest finisher among that group with 20 percent of the vote. Ossoff finished just shy of the 50 percent mark that would have allowed him to avoid the runoff and given Democrats the Sixth District seat for the first time in decades. “Dems failed in Kansas and are now failing in Georgia,” tweeted Trump on Wednesday morning, referencing last week’s special election in Kansas, which resulted in a narrow Republican win. “Great job Karen Handel! It is now Hollywood vs. Georgia on June 20th.” Trump first entered the fray late Tuesday, urging voters to head to the polls a few hours before they closed. In a series of media appearances Wednesday morning, Handel said that she welcomed the White House’s support as the race heads toward a June 20 runoff. “The president was beyond gracious and encouraging,” said Handel when asked on Fox News what Trump had said on their call, “and I appreciated it so much. And he specifically talked about strength under pressure, and I was grateful for that as well.” “I would hope so,” replied Handel when asked by CNN whether Trump would campaign with her. “All Republicans, it’s all hands on deck for us; we know what’s at stake here. I don’t think this is about any one person; we all have to rise above it, that it is about the district that has a long legacy of Republican leadership from my good friend current [Health and Human Services] Secretary Tom Price to Senator [Johnny] Isakson and former Speaker Newt Gingrich. We are all, including the very good 10 other Republican candidates, we are all going to be united because we know what the job is over the next 60 days.” Tuesday’s results have been seen as at least a slight rebuke of the White House. “Trump Loyalists flail in Georgia special election,” read an Atlanta Journal-Constitution headline. Political reporter Greg Bluestein wrote in the piece that “the pro-Trump route was always a risk in Georgia’s 6th District, an establishment-friendly stretch that he carried by less than 2 points in November.” Conservative radio host and Georgia resident Erick Erickson concurred, writing Tuesday night, “The more closely aligned a candidate was with President Trump, the worse that candidate did.” Handel was confident that the Sixth’s voters would rally to her by the runoff. “What I hear out across the district is this,” said Handel in her Wednesday interview with CNN. “The people of this district want a congressman that they know, that they trust, someone who has a real track record. They’re not interested in someone who doesn’t even live in the district, someone who has a really thin résumé and very lacking in experience.” Ossoff grew up in the district but currently lives with his girlfriend, who is enrolled in medical school at Emory University, just outside the district. He was unable to vote for himself in Tuesday’s election but has said he plans to move back into the Sixth as soon as his girlfriend finishes her studies. Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez projected confidence in Ossoff’s ability to pull out the runoff in June. “Organize,” said Perez when asked on MSNBC Wednesday what Democrats would be doing between now and June 20 to win the seat. “And that’s exactly what we’re doing. We’re going to be out on the street. There’s still opportunity out there. There’s still voters who didn’t vote before that are eligible to vote now. We’ve identified them, and we will be out there knocking on their doors, and they’ll see your vote can make the difference because we’re already at 49 percent when you look at both John Ossoff and the three Democrats who got roughly 1 percent of the vote between them, and so I’m actually very optimistic. You see this energy everywhere across America. I’ve been traveling across the country this week, and the energy is palpable. We’re going to translate that energy into more votes.” The nonpartisan Cook Political Report rates the race as a tossup.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.sciencenews.org

The next flu drug could come from frog mucus. It’s not as crazy as it sounds: For decades, scientists have searched for new antiviral drugs by mining proteins that animals produce to protect themselves from microbes. In lab tests, proteins found in amphibian secretions can defend against HIV, herpes and now the flu. David Holthausen of Emory University and his colleagues sampled slime from the skin of Hydrophylax bahuvistara, a recently discovered frog species from southern India. They tested the influenza-fighting ability of 32 slime proteins, and four showed promise. Of those, three proved toxic to mammals. But one peptide, dubbed urumin, was safe for mammals and showed a propensity for fighting off the flu. When exposed to four H3N2 and eight H1N1 strains, urumin inhibited H3N2 viruses to a degree but was particularly adept at killing H1N1 viruses, which are more common among humans. The frog slime protein even cut viral numbers in a set of seven drug-resistant strains, and protected mice from flu infection. The team found that urumin blows up flu virus particles by targeting the stalk region of the hemagglutinin protein in H1 varieties. With further development, urumin could form the basis of future influenza drugs, the researchers write April 18 in Immunity. Editor's note: This article was updated on April 19, 2017, to clarify the methodology and results of the study.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A component of the skin mucus secreted by South Indian frogs can kill the H1 variety of influenza viruses, researchers from Emory Vaccine Center and the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology in India have discovered. Frogs' skins were known to secrete "host defense peptides" that defend them against bacteria. The finding, scheduled for publication in Immunity, suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well. Anti-flu peptides could become handy when vaccines are unavailable, in the case of a new pandemic strain, or when circulating strains become resistant to current drugs, says senior author Joshy Jacob, PhD, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Emory Vaccine Center and Emory University School of Medicine. The first author of the paper is graduate student David Holthausen, and the research grew out of collaboration with M.R. Pillai, PhD and Sanil George, PhD from the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology. Jacob and his colleagues named one of the antiviral peptides they identified urumin, after a whip-like sword called "urumi" used in southern India centuries ago. Urumin was found in skin secretions from the Indian frog Hydrophylax bahuvistara, which were collected after mild electrical stimulation. Peptides are short chains of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Some anti-bacterial peptides work by punching holes in cell membranes, and are thus toxic to mammalian cells, but urumin was not. Instead, urumin appears to only disrupt the integrity of flu virus, as seen through electron microscopy. It binds the stalk of hemagglutinin, a less variable region of the flu virus that is also the target of proposed universal vaccines. This specificity could be valuable because current anti-influenza drugs target other parts of the virus, Jacob says. Because flu viruses from humans cannot infect frogs, producing urumin probably confers on frogs an advantage in fighting some other pathogen, he says. Delivered intranasally, urumin protected unvaccinated mice against a lethal dose of some flu viruses. Urumin was specific for H1 strains of flu, such as the 2009 pandemic strain, and was not effective against other current strains such as H3N2. Developing antimicrobial peptides into effective drugs has been a challenge in the past, partly because enzymes in the body can break them down. Jacob's lab is now exploring ways to stabilize antiviral peptides such as urumin, as well as looking for frog-derived peptides that are active against other viruses like dengue and Zika. Holthausen is in the Immunology and Molecular Pathogenesis graduate program. Jacob's lab is based at Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The research was supported by Emory University and by the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (Primate centers: P51OD11132).


A doctor claims to have stumbled upon a potentially effective treatment for sepsis, a deadly condition marked by the body's overwhelming and life-threatening response to severe infection Patients who develop sepsis face longer treatments and higher healthcare costs. They also have a higher likelihood of suffering from complications. Those who become septic tend to suffer from low blood pressure that can lead to multiple organ failures. The condition is highly fatal killing more people in the hospital than any other disease. Now, a doctor from Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia, claims he has discovered a potential cure for the disease and the treatment's primary ingredient is Vitamin C. Paul Marik said he already treated about 150 patients with sepsis using an infusion of vitamin C, thiamine, and low dose of steroids. The treatment has high success rate. Of those he treated, only one died of sepsis, which is remarkable given that 300,000 of 1 million cases of sepsis in the United States per year are fatal. Despite the promising results of Marik's treatment, other experts warned healthcare workers not to use or replicate the treatment just yet because the results could be different when the treatment is tried in a larger study. Emory University School of Medicine surgery professor Craig Coopersmith, a top sepsis researcher, cautioned that Marik's treatment needs to be treated as a preliminary deal that needs to be validated. He said that further tests are necessary before any conclusions can be drawn about the new treatment's efficacy. Coopersmith's skepticism is not without good reason. Hundreds of promising results from sepsis studies have failed in follow-up research. Coopersmith said that a result may seem very exciting when it is done in a group in one hospital with one group of clinicians but it may turn out otherwise when it involves a larger group of patients in multiple centers. "Thus far we've been unsuccessful with anything," Coopersmith said. Ron Daniels, from UK Sepsis Trust, said that Markin's treatment has only been used in a small number of patients and it isn't clear if the vitamin C or the steroid is responsible for the results. Daniels said that the results are almost too good to be true and these need to be tested properly in controlled trials. "It's an unorthodox way of doing research," Daniels said. He said that if the treatment is proven effective in further research, it could potentially pave way for future hospital therapies since the ingredients are relatively cheap and accessible. In their study describing the treatment which was published in a study published in the journal Chest on Dec. 6, Marik and colleagues acknowledged that additional studies are needed to confirm their preliminary findings. "Our results suggest that the early use of intravenous vitamin C, together with corticosteroids and thiamine may prove to be effective in preventing progressive organ dysfunction." Marik and colleagues wrote. "Additional studies are required to confirm these preliminary findings." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Most tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer therapies based on the action of reactive oxygen species are ineffective. Now, American scientists have developed a hybrid nanomaterial that releases a free-radical-generating prodrug inside tumor cells upon thermal activation. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the free radicals destroy the cell components even in oxygen-depleted conditions, causing apoptosis. Delivery, release, and action of the hybrid material can be precisely controlled. Many well-established cancer treatment schemes are based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which induce apoptosis for the tumor cells. However, this mechanism only works in the presence of oxygen, and hypoxic (oxygen-depleted) regions in the tumor tissue often survive the ROS-based treatment. Therefore, Younan Xia at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, USA, and his team have developed a strategy to deliver and release a radical-generating prodrug that, upon activation, damages cells by a ROS-type radical mechanism, but without the need for oxygen. The authors explained that they had to turn to the field of polymerization chemistry to find a compound that produces enough radicals. There, the azo compound AIPH is a well-known polymerization initiator. In medicinal applications, it generates free alkyl radicals that cause DNA damage and lipid and protein peroxidation in cells even under hypoxic conditions. However, the AIPH must be safely delivered to the cells in the tissue. Thus, the scientists used nanocages, the cavities of which were filled with lauric acid, a so-called phase-change material (PCM) that can serve as a carrier for AIPH. Once inside the target tissue, irradiation by a near-infrared laser heats up the nanocages, causing the PCM to melt and triggering the release and decomposition of AIPH. This concept worked well, as the team has shown with a variety of experiments on different cell types and components. Red blood cells underwent pronounced hemolysis. Lung cancer cells incorporated the nanoparticles and were severely damaged by the triggered release of the radical starter. Actin filaments retracted and condensed following the treatment. And the lung cancer cells showed significant inhibition of their growth rate, independently of the oxygen concentration. Although the authors admit that "the efficacy still needs to be improved by optimizing the components and conditions involved," they have demonstrated the effectiveness of their hybrid system in killing cells, also in places where the oxygen level is low. This strategy might be highly relevant in nanomedicine, cancer theranostics, and in all applications where targeted delivery and controlled release with superb spatial/temporal resolutions is desired. Dr. Xia is the Brock Family Chair and Georgia Research Alliance (GRA) Eminent Scholar in Nanomedicine in The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. The Xia group's research activities center on the design and synthesis of novel nanomaterials for a broad range of applications, including nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, cancer theranostics, tissue engineering, controlled release, catalysis, and fuel cell technology. Dr. Xia has received many prestigious awards.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

All stakeholders in the scientific research enterprise -- researchers, institutions, publishers, funders, scientific societies, and federal agencies - should improve their practices and policies to respond to threats to the integrity of research WASHINGTON - All stakeholders in the scientific research enterprise -- researchers, institutions, publishers, funders, scientific societies, and federal agencies - should improve their practices and policies to respond to threats to the integrity of research, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Actions are needed to ensure the availability of data necessary for reproducing research, clarify authorship standards, protect whistleblowers, and make sure that negative as well as positive research findings are reported, among other steps. The report stresses the important role played by institutions and environments - not only individual researchers -- in supporting scientific integrity. And it recommends the establishment of an independent, nonprofit Research Integrity Advisory Board to support ongoing efforts to strengthen research integrity. The board should work with all stakeholders in the research enterprise to share expertise and approaches for minimizing and addressing research misconduct and detrimental practices. "The research enterprise is not broken, but it faces significant challenges in creating the conditions needed to foster and sustain the highest standards of integrity," said Robert Nerem, chair of the committee that wrote the report, and Institute Professor and Parker H. Petit Professor Emeritus, Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology. "To meet these challenges, all parties in the research enterprise need to take deliberate steps to strengthen the self-correcting mechanisms that are part of research and to better align the realities of research with its values and ideals." A growing body of evidence indicates that substantial percentages of published results in some fields are not reproducible, the report says, noting that this is a complex phenomenon and much remains to be learned. While a certain level of irreproducibility due to unknown variables or errors is a normal part of research, data falsification and detrimental research practices -- such as inappropriate use of statistics or after-the-fact fitting of hypotheses to previously collected data -- apparently also play a role. In addition, new forms of detrimental research practices are appearing, such as predatory journals that do little or no editorial review or quality control of papers while charging authors substantial fees. And the number of retractions of journal articles has increased, with a significant percentage of those retractions due to research misconduct. The report cautions, however, that this increase does not necessarily indicate that the incidence of misconduct is increasing, as more-vigilant scrutiny by the community may be a contributing factor. The report endorses the definition of scientific misconduct proposed in the 1992 Academies report Responsible Science: "fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reporting research." However, many practices that have until now been categorized as "questionable" research practices - for example, misleading use of statistics that falls short of falsification, and failure to retain research data -- should be recognized as "detrimental" research practices, the new report says. Detrimental research practices should be understood to include not only actions of individual researchers but also irresponsible or abusive actions by research institutions and journals. "The research process goes beyond the actions of individual researchers," said Nerem. "Research institutions, journals, scientific societies, and other parts of the research enterprise all can act in ways that either support or undermine integrity in research." Because research institutions play a central role in fostering research integrity, they should maintain the highest standards for research conduct, going beyond simple compliance with federal regulations and applying these standards to all research independent of the source of funding. Institutions' key responsibilities include creating and sustaining a research culture that fosters integrity and encourages adherence to best practices, as well as monitoring the integrity of their research environments. Senior leaders at each institution -- the president, other senior executives, and faculty leaders -- should guide and be actively engaged in these tasks. Furthermore, they must have the capacity to effectively investigate and address allegations of research misconduct and to address the conflict of interest that institutions may have in conducting these investigations -- for example, by incorporating external perspectives. In addition, research institutions and federal agencies should ensure that good faith whistleblowers - those who raise concerns about the integrity of research - are protected and their concerns addressed in a fair, thorough, and timely manner. Inadequate responses to such concerns have been a critical point of failure in many cases of misconduct where investigations were delayed or sidetracked. Currently, standards for transparency in many fields and disciplines do not adequately support reproducibility and the ability to build on previous work, the report says. Research sponsors and publishers should ensure that the information needed for a person knowledgeable about the field and its techniques to reproduce the reported results is made available at the time of publication or as soon as possible after that. Federal funding agencies and other research sponsors should also allocate sufficient funds to enable the long-term storage, archiving, and access of datasets and code necessary to replicate published findings. Researchers should routinely disclose all statistical tests carried out, including negative findings, the report says. Available evidence indicates that scientific publications are biased against presenting negative results and that the publication of negative results is on the decline. But routine reporting of negative findings will help avoid unproductive duplication of research and make research spending more productive. Dissemination of negative results also has prompted a questioning of established paradigms, leading ultimately to groundbreaking new discoveries. Research sponsors, research institutions, and journals should support and encourage this level of transparency. Scientific societies and journals should develop clear disciplinary authorship standards based on the principle that those who have made a significant intellectual contribution are authors. Those who engage in these activities should be designated as authors, and all authors should approve the final manuscript. Universal condemnation by all disciplines of gift or honorary authorship, coercive authorship, and ghost authorship would also contribute to changing the culture of research environments where these practices are still accepted. To bring a unified focus to addressing challenges in fostering research integrity across all disciplines and sectors, the report urges the establishment of a nonprofit, independent Research Integrity Advisory Board. The RIAB could facilitate the exchange of information on approaches to assessing and creating environments of the highest integrity and to handling allegations of misconduct and investigations. It could provide advice, support, encouragement, and where helpful advocacy on what needs to be done by research institutions, journal and book publishers, and other stakeholders in the research enterprise. The RIAB would have no direct role in investigations, regulation, or accreditation; instead it will serve as a neutral resource that helps the research enterprise respond to challenges. In addition, the report recommends that government agencies and private foundations fund research to quantify conditions in the research environment that may be linked to research misconduct and detrimental research practices, and to develop responses to these conditions. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey of the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Office of Research Integrity of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of the Inspector General of the National Science Foundation, the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Society for Neuroscience, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are private, nonprofit institutions that provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. They operate under an 1863 congressional charter to the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President Lincoln. For more information, visit http://national-academies. . A roster follows. Sara Frueh, Media Officer Joshua Blatt, Media Assistant Office of News and Public Information 202-334-2138; e-mail news@nas.edu national-academies.org/newsroom Follow us on Twitter at @theNASEM Copies of Fostering Integrity in Research are available from the National Academies Press on the Internet at http://www. or by calling 202-334-3313 or 1-800-624-6242. Reporters may obtain a copy from the Office of News and Public Information (contacts listed above). Robert M. Nerem1,2 (chair) Institute Professor and Parker H. Petit Professor Emeritus Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta Ann M. Arvin2 Lucile Packard Professor of Pediatrics, Vice Provost and Dean of Research, and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology Stanford University Stanford, Calif. C.K. (Tina) Gunsalus Director National Center for Professional and Research Ethics University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Deborah G. Johnson Anne Shirley Carter Olsson Professor Emeritus of Applied Ethics Department of Science, Technology, and Society School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Virginia Charlottesville Michael A. Keller Ida M. Green University Librarian, and Director of Academic Information Resources University Libraries and Academic Information Resources Stanford University Stanford, Calif. W. Carl Lineberger3 E.U. Condon Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, and Fellow JILA University of Colorado Boulder Victoria Stodden Associate Professor of Statistics Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Sara E. Wilson Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Academic Director Bioengineering Graduate Program University of Kansas Lawrence Paul R. Wolpe Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Bioethics, and Director Center for Ethics Emory University Atlanta 1 Member, National Academy of Engineering 2 Member, National Academy of Medicine 3 Member, National Academy of Sciences


(PR NewsChannel) / May 5, 2017 / Atlanta, Georgia Gabriel Nassar, MD, FACOG, Obstetrician and Gynecologist with his own practice, and affiliated with Atlanta Medical Center and Grady Memorial Hospital, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Atlanta, Georgia. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Gabriel Nassar is a very experienced physician, who has been in practice for more than 54 years. His long and successful career in medicine started in 1962, when he graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the Pontifical Xavierian University in Bogota, Columbia. This was followed by an internship at San Juan de Dios City Hospital. After moving to the United States, Dr. Nassar completed a residency and then fellowship at Emory University’s Crawford Long Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Nassar is certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and with his wealth of experience to call upon he has become renowned as one of Atlanta’s foremost experts in the treatment of women’s fertility issues. He is also noted as an expert in the use of minimally invasive surgery, speeding up typical recovery times. Dr. Nassar has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and is noted for his patient centric focus as well as his clinical excellence. In addition to his clinical work, he serves as Assistant Professor of OB GYN at Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia..His dedication and expertise honed over more than five decades makes Dr. Gabriel Nassar a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. About Top Doctor Awards Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Hypersomnia Foundation, Inc., the leading hypersomnia advocacy and awareness non-profit, announces their annual Regional Conference, to be held Sunday, June 4th in Boston. The conference will embrace the theme of “Advocacy & Empowerment.” Speakers will address various challenges for people with idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), a chronic, neurological sleep disorder. People with IH have an overwhelming need for sleep throughout the day, affecting their ability to concentrate. They have extreme difficulty waking, and a full night’s sleep makes no difference to these symptoms. The disorder makes it extremely challenging for people with IH to hold down jobs, remain in school, maintain marriages and fully engage with their family and friends. In a society where feeling “tired” is a common complaint, sufferers are often labelled “unmotivated” or “lazy.” It is not uncommon for people to struggle for years to cope on their own and for many, just getting a diagnosis of IH from a Board Certified Sleep Physician is a relief. Conference topics will include “Staying Ahead of IH at Work,” presented by disability attorney Anjel Burgess, who notes that too often, people with IH are unsure what to do when their hypersomnia begins to affect them on the job. Ms. Burgess, who has represented numerous people with IH in her home state of Georgia, will share her recommendations. Stanford clinical psychologist/sleep researcher Kate Kaplan will address how psychotherapy can improve overall quality of life for people with hypersomnia. HF Board member Mary King, Ed.D will moderate a panel on education challenges. The panel will include two students with hypersomnia, who will share how they successfully navigated college. Dr. Lynn Marie Trotti of Emory University Sleep Center will provide an annual update of research, and a review of what we are learning from the patient registry established by the Hypersomnia Foundation in 2016. The conference will be held in Rabb Lecture Hall, Boston Public Library, June 4th, 12:30-4:30pm ET, and may be viewed online, free. For more: http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/2017hfrc/. The Hypersomnia Foundation, Inc. strives to improve the lives of people with idiopathic hypersomnia and related disorders by advocating on their behalf, providing support and information, raising awareness and aiding research. For more: http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/ and follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Let’s Get #BeyondSleepy #HFconf


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

DUNWOODY, Ga. (AP) — A Georgia congressional election is headed to a runoff that will ratchet up the already significant national attention — and campaign cash — on a race that poses an early measure for President Donald Trump and both major parties ahead of the 2018 midterm elections. Democrat Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old former congressional staffer, and Republican Karen Handel, a former Georgia secretary of state, will meet in the June 20 runoff. But as they campaign across the northern suburbs of Atlanta, they will act largely as proxies for the roiled political atmosphere in Washington and across the country. Ossoff led an 18-candidate field of Republicans, Democrats and independents, the entire slate placed on a single ballot to choose a successor to Republican Tom Price, who resigned to join Trump's administration as health secretary. But Ossoff fell shy of the majority required to claim Georgia's 6th Congressional District outright, opening the door to Handel, who finished a distant second but ahead of a gaggle of Republican contenders. Republicans believe a two-candidate scenario will benefit them in a district that has been in Republican hands since 1978, when Atlanta suburbanites elected a young congressman named Newt Gingrich. But Ossoff's campaign maintains momentum, fueled by more than $8 million in contributions from all over the nation, and liberal advocacy groups on Tuesday hailed his first-place finish as a success in its own right. National leaders in both major parties agreed the Georgia race is a prime test run for the 2018 election cycle, because the affluent, well-educated district is replete with the kind of voters Democrats must win over to have any chance at reclaiming a House majority and winning more governor's races. At the least, the results suggest Republicans have no easy answer for how to handle Trump in down-ballot races. He still engenders an intense loyalty among his core supporters but alienates many independents and even Republicans, leaving him unable to command a majority of the electorate. That was reflected in November, when Trump barely won the Georgia 6th over Hillary Clinton, falling shy of a majority just four years after Republican Mitt Romney garnered more than 60 percent of the presidential vote. Given those fundamentals, Ossoff has tried to capitalize on the anti-Trump energy while still appealing to independents and moderate Republicans in the conservative district. He demonstrated the tightrope through the final hours of the primary campaign. "This is not about me. ... This is about the kind of community we want to live in. The kind of country we believe in," Ossoff told supporters Monday night, forgoing any mention of the president despite Trump attacking him on Twitter as a "super liberal" who wanted to raise taxes, protect criminals and allow illegal immigration. Trump continued his Twitter barrage Tuesday, even as a White House spokeswoman insisted the race wasn't a "referendum" on the president. Sarah Huckabee Sanders made that case within hours of Trump urging 6th District Republicans to vote and mocking Ossoff for not living in the district. Ossoff acknowledges that he lives a few miles south of the district, in Atlanta, so that his girlfriend is closer to her work at Emory University's medical complex. Republicans, meanwhile, have made their own attempts at nationalizing the race. A political action committee backed by current Speaker Paul Ryan funneled more than $2 million into attacks on Ossoff, mostly tying him to national Democrats such as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. Handel, meanwhile, called Ossoff Pelosi's "hand-picked" candidate. Pelosi remains an unpopular figure in the district, which includes GOP-leaning territory in three metro Atlanta counties: Cobb, Fulton and DeKalb. Handel rarely if ever talked about Trump unless she was asked. But she also was careful not to criticize the new administration. "I certainly support the president and will work with him where we agree," Handel told the Associated Press at one of her final campaign stops before polls opened. "But my job is not to go to Congress as a rubber stamp for anybody. My job is to be the representative for the people of the 6th District, and that's what I believe regardless of who is the president." Handel left some of her Republican rivals to squabble over who would be more loyal to Trump. One of her closest competitors, technology executive Bob Gray, even donned hip waders for one television spot as he paid homage to one of the president's campaign signatures by, literally, draining a swamp Associated Press reporter Catherine Lucey in Washington and Kathleen Foody in Alpharetta, Georgia, contributed. Follow Barrow at https://twitter.com/BillBarrowAP .


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The function of a plant's roots go well beyond simply serving as an anchor in the ground. The roots act as the plant's mouth, absorbing, storing and channeling water and nutrients essential for survival. Researchers have devoted tremendous effort to engineering plants that are more effective at these tasks in order to develop hardier forms that can withstand drought or low-nutrient conditions. In a new investigation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have taken another step toward achieving this goal. They identified two proteins that regulate whether a cell in plant roots forms a hair cell, which increases surface area for absorption, or a non-hair cell. Plants that overexpressed one of these regulators thrived despite being deprived of a key nutrient, phosphorous. "Normally plants respond to phosphous deprivation by becoming smaller, which means less biomass, less food production and less seed production," said Brian Gregory, an associate professor in the Department of Biology in Penn's School of Arts & Sciences and senior author on the paper. "The intriguing thing is, by overexpressing one of these proteins we identify, GRP8, we were able to produce plants that don't show this kind of dwarfing nearly as significantly as normal plants under phosphorous starvation. That's the exact phenotype we want." Such plants, which produce more hair cells and thus can more readily absorb water from the soil, could also do well under conditions predicted to be more prevalent under climate change, notably in widespread droughts. The lead author of the work, published in Developmental Cell, is Shawn W. Foley, a recent Ph.D. recipient in the Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program of Penn's Perelman School of Medicine. Additional contributors from Penn were Sager J. Gosai, Nur Selamoglu, Amelia C. Solitti and Fevzi Daldal of the Department of Biology, as well as Benjamin A. Garcia of Perelman. They teamed with Dongxue Wang and Roger B. Deal of Emory University; Tino Köster, Alexander Steffen and Dorothee Staiger of Germany's Bielefeld University; and Eric Lyons of the University of Arizona. Deal and Gregory are co-corresponding authors on the paper. The researchers initially pursued the study with the aim of determining the difference in RNA between two very similar populations of hair and non-hair cells in the roots of the plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Using pure populations of nuclei from each of the two cell types, they employed an approach developed earlier by the lab called PIP-seq, which obtains a complete catalog of the interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins, interactions that can influence gene expression. This methodology also allowed the team to examine the secondary structure, or folding, of all of the cells' RNA transcripts. "We were able to see that there were distinct differnces in RNA secondary structure as well as differences in protein binding between root hair and non-hair cells," said Foley. As a next step, they identified some of the RNA binding proteins that displayed distinct binding profiles between the cell populations and found two that seemed significant. One, called SERRATE, "is known to play a role," Foley said, "in alternative splicing and microRNA biogenesis," processes that can alter gene expression in different ways. When they interrogated mutant plant lines with reduced SERRATE levels, they found that plants had more, longer hair cells. A second RNA binding protein they identified was GRP8, also a protein known to affect plants' response to stress through regulating processes that affect gene expression. Plants that the researchers engineered to overexpress GRP8 had an increased number of root-hair cells. To test whether this trait affected the plant's ability to grow, they cultivated the GRP8-overexpressing plants in phosphorous-depleted soil. They found these plants were able to turn on genes that increase the ability to take up and transport phosphate compared to normal plants. The result was larger plants. "We actually do see increased phosphate uptake as well as increased biomass of these plants," Foley said. "We got larger, hardier plants under phosphate starvation. We believe it's due to GRP8 functioning in the phosphate response pathway leading to increased root hair formation." In research now underway, the authors are testing to see whether these findings extend to other plant species, specifically in crop plants. Phosphate is a necessary resource for plants, and thus a component of most fertilizers, but excess phosphate often ends up in waterways, where it can harm aquatic ecosystems. Growing crop plants that require less phosphate could lessen these issues. In addition to the applications of the findings to improving the efficiency of food production, the researchers note that their technique of identifying the differences in RNA between two closely related cell types can extend to systems beyond plants as well. "This study is a demonstration of our ability," Gregory said, "to use a genome-wide approach to studying two very similar cell types, and then drill down and find biologically meaningful proteins to study. It provides a model for us and others to move forward in finding post-transcriptional regulators in different developmental stages and stress responses and all kinds of scenarios. Added Foley, "Something like this really begs the questions of, If we can have different secondary stuructre between these cells types, what other processes can RNA be refolded during and what other processes can this help to regulate. That's a direction the lab is going." The research was supported by the National Science Foundation, German Research Foundation and National Institute for General Medical Sciences.


The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in Kentucky proved most beneficial for Kentuckians living in areas with high concentrations of poverty, particularly children, according to a study by a researcher in the University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences in collaboration with colleagues at Ohio State University and Emory University. The study was published recently in Health Services Research. Joseph Benitez, Ph.D., assistant professor in UofL's Department of Health Management and System Sciences and member of the school's Commonwealth Institute of Kentucky, said the findings suggest expanding Medicaid is one mechanism that largely helped to address many of the health care needs of some of the poorest Kentuckians. "Most of the reduction in Kentucky's uninsured rate between 2013 through 2015 was driven by an uptake in coverage within ZIP codes of high poverty concentrations," Benitez said. "Similarly, the study revealed statistically and substantively meaningful reductions in the number of Kentuckians who delayed or decided not to seek medical care due to cost, in addition to having a regular source of medical care. These findings were almost entirely concentrated among Kentuckians living in poorer ZIP codes." Utilizing a version of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from Kentucky's Department for Public Health, the study compared trends before and after implementation of the ACA in health insurance coverage, access measures and health care utilization for Kentuckians in higher verses lower poverty ZIP codes. This builds on a previous study conducted by Benitez and his UofL colleagues that found the uninsured rate among Kentucky households with annual incomes below $25,000 dropped from 35 percent in 2013 to almost 10 percent by the end of 2014. The same households also saw a 50 percent reduction in the number of those foregoing medical care because of high costs. Benitez says although it may be too early to identify meaningful improvement in health status of Kentuckians, given the promising results for coverage, access and utilization among some of the most economically vulnerable population, positive long-term health effects are likely. "It is clear from this study that expanding Medicaid helps address the health care needs of the impoverished. Using Kentucky as a case example to study the effects of the ACA across geographic areas holds lessons for policy makers weighing the costs and benefits of ACA participation," Benitez said.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Frog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs. One of these "host defense peptides," courtesy of a colorful tennis-ball-sized frog species (Hydrophylax bahuvistara) from southern India, can destroy many strains of human flu and protect mice against flu infection, researchers report April 18 in the journal Immunity. This peptide is far from becoming an anti-flu drug, but this is the first evidence of its flu-killing ability. It seems to work by binding to a protein that is identical across many influenza strains, and in lab experiments, it was able to neutralize dozens of flu strains, from the 1934 archival viruses up to modern ones. The researchers named the newly identified peptide "urumin," after the urumi, a sword with a flexible blade that snaps and bends like a whip, which comes from the same Indian province, Kerala, as the frog. "Different frogs make different peptides, depending on where their habitat is. You and I make host defense peptides ourselves," says flu specialist and study co-author Joshy Jacob of Emory University. "It's a natural innate immune mediator that all living organisms maintain. We just happened to find one that the frog makes that just happens to be effective against the H1 influenza type." Practically all animals make at least a few anti-microbial host defense peptides as part of their innate immune systems, and researchers are only beginning to catalog them. However, frogs have drawn the most attention as a source of host defense peptides, because it's relatively easy to isolate the peptides from their mucus. Researchers can simply give the frogs a small electric shock or rub a powder on the frogs to make them secrete their defense peptides, which can then be collected. Researchers from the Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology in Kerala, India, have been isolating peptides from their local frogs and screening them for potential anti-bacterials, but Jacob wondered if there might also be peptides that neutralize human-infecting viruses. Jacob and his colleagues screened 32 frog defense peptides against an influenza strain and found that 4 of them had flu-busting abilities. "I was almost knocked off my chair," says Jacob. "In the beginning, I thought that when you do drug discovery, you have to go through thousands of drug candidates, even a million, before you get 1 or 2 hits. And here we did 32 peptides, and we had 4 hits." Unfortunately, when the researchers exposed isolated human red blood cells (in a dish) to the flu-buster peptides, three out of the four proved toxic. However, the fourth--urumin--seemed harmless to human cells but lethal to a wide range of flu viruses. Electron microscope images of the virus after exposure to urumin reveal a virus that has been completely dismantled. Jacob's team is still working out the details of the flu-destroying mechanism, but the urumin appears to work by targeting a viral surface protein called hemagluttinin, the H in H1N1. "The virus needs this hemagglutinin to get inside our cells," says Jacob. "What this peptide does is it binds to the hemagglutinin and destabilizes the virus. And then it kills the virus." This work was supported in part by a NIH base grant to Yerkes National Primate Center. Immunity, Holthausen et al.: "An Amphibian Host Defense Peptide Is Virucidal for Human H1 Hemagglutinin-Bearing Influenza Virusest" http://www.cell.com/immunity/fulltext/S1074-7613(17)30128-0 Immunity (@ImmunityCP), published by Cell Press, is a monthly journal that reports the most important advances in immunology research. Topics include: immune cell development and senescence, signal transduction, gene regulation, innate and adaptive immunity, autoimmunity, infectious disease, allergy and asthma, transplantation, and tumor immunology. Visit: http://www. . To receive Cell Press media alerts, contact press@cell.com.


WASHINGTON, DC, May 05, 2017-- Alessandra Valentina Maria Romana Valeria Gelmi is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dottoressa Gelmi a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Ms. Gelmi celebrates many years' experience in her professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes she has accrued in her field.In Ms. Gelmi's most recent positions, she served as an author, journalist, playwright, poet, and educator.In addition to Ms. Gelmi's status as a Lifetime Achiever, she has been honored as a Leslie Fay Woman of the Year, and was praised in 1992 as one of the Most Beautiful Women in America. Beyond her physical appearance, she received the Pushcart Prize, the Irene Leache Memorial Prize, the Amy Loveman Literature Prize, 2 "Readers' Favorite Book Awards", a "National Best Book Award" (USA NEWS), and 2 book awards from the National Federation of Press Woman. In addition, Dott.ssa Gelmi was recognized for "Excellence in Arts and Letters" by the National Association of Women for Progress in Africa. She has also been featured in numerous Marquis Who's Who publications, including Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Women and Who's Who in the World.Author of the novel "Who's Afraid of Red" - a chronicle of love set against the Rwandan genocide, hailed by Joel Siegel of Good Morning America as "Brilliant" and Desmond Tutu as "Historically Important"--and the poetry collection, "Ring of Fire" Selected Poems 1972-2008--heralded by The New Republic, The Partisan Review, and The New Criterion, Gelmi is also included in an "Anthology of Washington Women Fiction Writers", a New York Times Editors' Choice, titled "Amazing Graces".Her published poems are archived in special collections at Bowdoin College, Boston University, Barnard College, Columbia University and Dartmouth College (where she studied with Richard Eberhart and reviewed Alexander Laing's poetry collection Brandt Point for The Dartmouth).Born in Bergamo Italy, Alessandra Gelmi is a graduate of Barnard College, Columbia University. She was awarded a Masters Degree/Teaching Fellowship from Boston University, where she taught creative writing under the aegis of three Nobel Laureates. A former member of the White House Correspondents' Association, Alessandra has written for 4 national daily newspapers, dozens of magazines and has interviewed personalities from Stallone to Coretta Scott King. Her original plays "He and She" and "Falling Stars" were first performed at The Source Theater Festival in Washington, D.C. "Falling Stars" won first prize in its category at The Source and won first prize again when it was performed by an Equity cast, at The National Theater. Presently she works to raise funds for Mercy Center, a clinic and school in Kenya. Gelmi is an animal welfare supporter, has funded several animal care initiatives, and writes, as a senior reporter for "The Epoch Times" published internationally and devoted to human rights monitoring. In 2012 she hosted an eponymous television special documenting forced-organ-harvesting of prisoners of conscience in China.Gelmi's interest in journalism stems from her college days when her father, a surgeon, operated on Ferdinand Marcos. Alessandra asked to meet the then president of the Philippines and published the interview in "The Dartmouth", the oldest college newspaper in America.Gelmi is the daughter of June Villarreal--a Lady Commander of The Holy Sepulchre, a linguist, and former speechwriter for Egyptian foreign minister Fawzi--and is the great great granddaughter of the last Milanese consul of Czar Nicolas II.Alessandra Gelmi is now referenced in the collected papers of authors James Dickey (archived at Emory University Library) and Norman Mailer (archived at the University of Texas, Austin, in the Castaneda Library named after her great uncle, Carlos Eduardo Castaneda) . To learn more: www.alessandragelmi.com Memberships: Dartmouth Club of Washington; Harvard Club Book Prize Program Donor; The Army/Navy Club of Washington.; Dartmouth Class of 1978 Honor Roll Fundraising Drive; Barnard/Columbia Alumna; Marymount International School (Rome, Italy) Alumna; Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School Alumna; Member of The Academy of American Poets; Member (former) The White House Correspondents' Association; Member, of The Authors Guild of America; Member of The Academy of Future Science; Member of The National Federation of Press Women; Member of the Cobb Island Yacht Club; Founding Member, of Ave Maria University; Member of WETA's Presidents' Club; Trustee of The Notre Dame Institute of Catechetics; Board Member of "The Honorable Michael Feighan Collection", curated at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson Library; Friend of The Global Foundation for Democracy; Landmark World Education, Advanced Curriculum Graduate, PAX Graduate; Leslie Fay Woman of The Year; Bread Loaf Scholar; Investiture in the Sovereign Order of Melchizedek.In recognition of outstanding contributions to her profession and the Marquis Who's Who community, Ms. Gelmi has been featured on the Marquis Who's Who Lifetime Achievers website. Please visit https://wwlifetimeachievement.com/2017/04/04/alessandra-valentina-mar ... ria-gelmi/ to view this distinguished honor.2nd Address: Dott.ssa Alessandra Gelmi, Passagio Cividini 4, Porta Nuova, 24122, Bergamo, ItalyAbout Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


"This disease enacts a destructive toll on millions of Americans and their families. To defeat it, we need robust research funding that will yield a long-sought-after breakthrough. This funding increase is a positive step forward. Additional basic and clinical research funding is essential to achieve our national goal of a prevention and treatment by 2025," said George Vradenburg, UsAgainstAlzheimer's Co-Founder and Chair. "We will continue to press policymakers to make investments as the disease costs American families and taxpayers $259 billion per year." Currently, more than 80 percent of the NIH budget goes to about 300,000 outside researchers supporting research and jobs concerning a wide variety of diseases. Some of these researchers are part of the Global Alzheimer's Platform Foundation Network (GAP-Net). GAP-Net is a collaboration of 51 leading academic and private commercial research institutions working to reduce the cycle time of clinical research and drug development for Alzheimer's disease – bringing therapies to market faster. "The research being done today has put us closer than ever to promising discoveries in predictors of Alzheimer's. This increase in funding will continue the momentum as we seek to find a cure for this devastating disease," said GAP-Net member Allan Levey, MD, PhD, professor and chair of department of neurology of Emory University School of Medicine and director of the Emory Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. According to the Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's is America's costliest disease. Nearly 5.5 million Americans have the disease. This number could rise to as high as 16 million by 2050. More than 15 million caregivers provide an estimated 18 billion hours of unpaid care every year. This bipartisan effort was spearheaded by Senate Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies Subcommittee Chairman Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) and Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-Wash.), and by House Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies Subcommittee Chairman Tom Cole (R-Okla.), and House Appropriations Committee Ranking Member Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.). The Global Alzheimer's Platform Foundation was launched in 2015 by UsAgainstAlzheimer's and the Global CEO Initiative (CEOi) on Alzheimer's Disease with the vision of creating an integrated global clinical trial network to reduce the time, cost and risk of Alzheimer's disease clinical trials, a critical factor in the pacing of efforts to speed an effective treatment of Alzheimer's disease to those with or at risk of the disease. Global Alzheimer's Platform Foundation, headquartered in Washington, D.C., aims to create a faster pathway to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease by 2025. It intends to do so by building a standing global clinical trial platform of willing individuals through novel recruitment techniques coupled with a network of high performance clinical trial sites.  Global Alzheimer's Platform Foundation also provides an organizational framework that links prominent research institutions, the private sector and government agencies in multiple countries to fight Alzheimer's disease. For more information, please visit www.globalalzplatform.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-alzheimers-platform-foundation-supports-400-million-congressional-increase-for-alzheimers-research-funding-300452098.html


JERUSALEM--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE and TASE: TEVA) today announced that data suggests that women with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS) who were exposed to COPAXONE® 20 mg/mL daily during pregnancy are not at higher risk for congenital anomalies compared to reference rates for abnormal pregnancy outcomes reported in two large databases representing the general population. These data appeared as an “Online First” article on the Website of the International Journal of MS Care (IJMSC) and represent the largest published analysis of pregnancy pharmacovigilance data for an RMS treatment. MS is more common among women of childbearing age compared with any other age group. The average age of diagnosis is 30, and many women go on to have children after diagnosis. Approximately half of pregnancies are unintended, which means that women with MS may become pregnant unexpectedly while taking an MS treatment. None of the MS therapies are approved for use during pregnancy. “Physicians now have this data to consider as they consult with their RMS patients planning a family or already pregnant, to make individual treatment decisions,” said Patricia K. Coyle, M.D., professor and vice chair (clinical affairs) of neurology, and the director of the Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center at the Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York. The analysis published in IJMSC compared 5,025 pregnancy cases with known outcomes from the Glatiramer Acetate (GA) Pharmacovigilance Database to two other databases of healthy women, the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP)1 and the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT)2. When compared to the rate of congenital anomalies from the MACDP database, the rate for prospective pregnancies among women exposed to COPAXONE® while pregnant from the GA Pharmacovigilance Database was comparable to the general U.S. population. Similarly, the comparison between the GA Pharmacovigilance and EUROCAT data indicated that the rate of congenital anomalies is very similar to that of the general European population. “With more than 20 years of data collected on COPAXONE®, we are able to share this important analysis with physicians to consider and counsel their patients of child-bearing age,” said Rob Koremans, M.D., President and CEO, Teva Global Specialty Medicines. “We are pleased to put forward this data that may help facilitate that conversation.” The publication, “Pregnancy Outcomes from the Branded Glatiramer Acetate Pregnancy Database,” is available online at http://ijmsc.org/doi/abs/10.7224/1537-2073.2016-079. The International Journal of MS Care is the official peer-reviewed publication of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC). COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. The most common side effects of COPAXONE® are redness, pain, swelling, itching, or a lump at the site of injection, flushing, rash, shortness of breath, and chest pain. COPAXONE® is rated as Pregnancy Category B. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Administration of glatiramer acetate by subcutaneous injection to pregnant rats and rabbits resulted in no adverse effects on offspring development. Animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, therefore COPAXONE® should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. See additional important information at: www.CopaxonePrescribingInformation.com. For hardcopy releases, please see enclosed full prescribing information. The COPAXONE® brand is approved in more than 50 countries worldwide, including the United States, Russia, Canada, Mexico, Australia, Israel, and all European countries. Patients allergic to glatiramer acetate or mannitol should not take COPAXONE®. Some patients report a short-term reaction right after injecting COPAXONE®. This reaction can involve flushing (feeling of warmth and/or redness), chest tightness or pain with heart palpitations, anxiety, and trouble breathing. These symptoms generally appear within minutes of an injection, last about 15 minutes, and go away by themselves without further problems. During the postmarketing period, there have been reports of patients with similar symptoms who received emergency medical care. If symptoms become severe, patients should call the emergency phone number in their area. Patients should call their doctor right away if they develop hives, skin rash with irritation, dizziness, sweating, chest pain, trouble breathing, or severe pain at the injection site. If any of the above occurs, patients should not give themselves any more injections until their doctor tells them to begin again. Chest pain may occur either as part of the immediate postinjection reaction or on its own. This pain should only last a few minutes. Patients may experience more than one such episode, usually beginning at least one month after starting treatment. Patients should tell their doctor if they experience chest pain that lasts for a long time or feels very intense. A permanent indentation under the skin (lipoatrophy or, rarely, necrosis) at the injection site may occur, due to local destruction of fat tissue. Patients should follow proper injection technique and inform their doctor of any skin changes. The most common side effects of COPAXONE® are redness, pain, swelling, itching, or a lump at the site of injection, flushing, rash, shortness of breath, and chest pain. These are not all of the possible side effects of COPAXONE®. For a complete list, patients should ask their doctor or pharmacist. Patients should tell their doctor about any side effects they have while taking COPAXONE®. Patients are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE and TASE: TEVA) is a leading global pharmaceutical company that delivers high-quality, patient-centric healthcare solutions used by approximately 200 million patients in 100 markets every day. Headquartered in Israel, Teva is the world’s largest generic medicines producer, leveraging its portfolio of more than 1,800 molecules to produce a wide range of generic products in nearly every therapeutic area. In specialty medicines, Teva has the world-leading innovative treatment for multiple sclerosis as well as late-stage development programs for other disorders of the central nervous system, including movement disorders, migraine, pain and neurodegenerative conditions, as well as a broad portfolio of respiratory products. Teva is leveraging its generics and specialty capabilities in order to seek new ways of addressing unmet patient needs by combining drug development with devices, services and technologies. Teva's net revenues in 2016 were $21.9 billion. For more information, visit www.tevapharm.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding the potential benefits of COPAXONE® which are based on management’s current beliefs and expectations and are subject to substantial risks and uncertainties, both known and unknown, that could cause our future results, performance or achievements to differ significantly from that expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include risks relating to: and other factors discussed in our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2016 (“Annual Report”), including in the section captioned “Risk Factors,” and in our other filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which are available at www.sec.gov and www.tevapharm.com. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, and we assume no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements or other information contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. You are cautioned not to put undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. 1 Population-based tracking system for birth defects. The MACDP was established in 1967 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emory University, and the Georgia Mental Health Institute. 2 European network of population-based registries for the epidemiologic surveillance of congenital anomalies


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Hogan is thrilled to announce that the LANAP® protocol is now the world’s first FDA-cleared protocol for True Regeneration® and treatment of gum disease. With LANAP treatment, Dr. Hogan helps patients fight periodontal disease and gives them the tools necessary to regenerate gum and bone tissues lost to gum disease. Dr. Hogan, and his dedicated team, are now accepting new patients for this leading, minimally-invasive laser dentistry treatment in Mt. Pleasant, SC in order to save patients’ teeth and reach proper oral health and function. The LANAP protocol is the first ever FDA-cleared laser treatment within the dental field for treatment of periodontal disease and regeneration of tissue, including bone. In a historical first, the protocol has now been proven to regenerate some of the most vital tissues necessary for healthy attachment of the teeth, including the cementum, alveolar bone and periodontal ligaments. Applying skilled laser dentistry in Mt. Pleasant, SC, tissue is truly regenerated, or returned to its normal, healthy state following severe damage from gum disease. Gum disease begins with a mild infection and inflammation of the gums. When left untreated, it can progress into periodontal disease, which can breakdown the connective tissues of the gums and teeth. Eventually, the condition reaches its most severe stage, periodontitis. At this point, the damage to the gums and jaw bone is substantial and teeth may begin to become loose or fall out. With the help of the LANAP protocol and the PerioLase® MVP-7 laser, patients may be able to halt, and possibly reverse the damage caused by periodontal disease, regenerate gum tissue and inspire new bone growth, with minimal discomfort. Dr. Hogan encourages patients to experience the LANAP protocol remarking that, “it’s a seamless procedure that provides outstanding post-op treatment and results.” In an average of four to five hours, a patient’s entire mouth can be treated and he or she can return to normal daily routines the following day with minimal recovery time. Patients interested in learning how laser dentistry in Mt. Pleasant can eliminate their gum disease and save their natural teeth are invited to contact Dr. Hogan’s office for more information. To schedule an appointment, call 843-639-5921. Dr. Kevin Hogan is a general dentist providing individualized care for patients in Mt. Pleasant, SC. Dr. Hogan is a graduate of the Indiana University School of Dentistry and has completed hundreds of hours of continuing education courses to stay contemporary with the latest dental technologies. In addition, he has also completed coursework with the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation and has lectured at the University of North Carolina, Emory University, the Saginaw Valley University and AUA-American University of Antigua on head and neck anatomy and oral pathology. Dr. Hogan is a member of the American Dental Association, International College of Cranio-Mandibular Orthopedics, Academy of Laser Dentistry, International Association of Physiologic Aesthetics, Institute for Advanced Laser Dentistry, DOCS (the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation), International Congress of Oral Implantologists and the South Carolina Dental Association. He is also a past member of the American Straight Wire Orthodontic Association, Maxillofacial Orthopedic Growth and Development, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the Functional Orthodontic Society. He and his team are dedicated to providing exceptional oral care to patients through personalized treatment plans. To learn more about the services offered by Dr. Hogan, please visit his website at http://www.smilesbyhogan.com or call 843-639-5921.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Excel's 7th Annual Users' Conference, 2017, has expanded to three days with two connected tracks – a research track and a new clinical track. It brings together leading users, healthcare visionaries, physicians, clinicians, medical researchers, data scientists and technology partners from around the world who are focused on complex physiological data analytics, clinical workflows and medical device data. The event will include more than 20 user presentations, demos, panel discussions and breakout sessions that will expose participants to a comprehensive wave of current and future projects, trends, best practices, thought leadership, innovations and visions for ongoing development and collaboration. The Users' meeting will feature presentations by healthcare industry leaders from: This year's event is designed to stimulate discussion and continued development and application of high-value technologies for clinicians and researchers, and ramp up dialogue and collaboration between clinicians, academics and researchers using Excel's technologies. "We're excited to gather again with our rapidly expanded community of customers, partners, collaborators and innovators for three days of insights, knowledge exchange, planning and innovation at the front edge of translational medicine," said John Hoffman, co-founder, president and principal engineer at Excel Medical. "Our annual conference is the best place to be and we're delighted and grateful for everyone's upcoming participation." Academic institutions and hospital enterprises participating in the 2017 conference include Emory University Healthcare System, University of Maryland School of Medicine & R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, Milwaukee VA Medical Center and Massachusetts General Hospital. The 2017 conference will also provide attendees with a preview of Excel's soon-to-be-released next-generation clinical decision support software platform. Excel Medical is an industry innovator in medical device data acquisition, storage, and clinical integration across the hospital enterprise. Its products transform clinical workflow by liberating data and making it more accessible to clinicians through untethered access and Next-Generation Medical Device Integration™ with electronic medical records (EMR). Excel's technologies have direct impact on improving patient safety and care, workflow efficiency, and decreasing institutional risk. Partnering with IBM's TJ Watson Laboratory since 2011, Excel has developed a first-of-a-kind clinical streaming analytics platform that is shaping the future of critical care medicine. Excel's products are used by more than 80% of the top medical centers and children's hospitals in the United States. The company is headquartered in Jupiter, Florida, and has customers throughout North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia. More information at: www.excel-medical.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/excel-medical-announces-7th-annual-users-conference-2017-300451586.html


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Invest Atlanta and Georgia's Department of Economic Development, the primary economic development authorities in Atlanta and Georgia, were instrumental in facilitating Flexport's decision to expand to Atlanta and offering ongoing support. "Flexport's decision to establish a major operation here further cements Atlanta's role as a global logistics hub and home to many of the world's leading supply chain technology companies," said Dr. Eloisa Klementich, President and CEO of Invest Atlanta. "By choosing Atlanta, the company will be right at the heart of our region's burgeoning cross-sector tech community and at the doorstep of Georgia Tech, the Atlanta University Center and other talent-rich academic institutions." "Georgia continues to rise as a leader in the technology sector, and Atlanta is at the epicenter of this growth," said Georgia Department of Economic Development Commissioner Pat Wilson. "Flexport's decision to invest and create jobs in Atlanta is a testament to our commitment to supporting innovative technologies in Georgia, and meeting the growing demands of this industry. I look forward to watching them grow and thrive here." Flexport's decision to expand into Atlanta was solidified by Georgia's exceptional talent pool and enthusiastic adoption of the latest technology in logistics and freight. The city's location, transportation infrastructure, and strong logistics sector will enable Flexport to form lasting relationships with local service providers, working together to reach clients more quickly and efficiently. By air, Atlanta's airport offers access to 80 percent of the U.S. market within a two-hour flight, while, by land, Georgia's six interstates connect the state to 80 percent of the U.S. population within a two-day truck drive. Finally, by sea, the port of Savannah is the most efficient seaport operation in North America due to its large single-terminal design. The company hopes its presence in the state will support local clients and small businesses in identifying and managing global shipping solutions. "Atlanta is a booming technology center and is a natural fit for our next North American office," said Ryan Petersen, CEO and founder of Flexport. "The city has the busiest airport in the world to bring us closer to our air freight operations and is advantageously located near the port of Savannah, where they've been making huge investments to handle the bigger ships coming through the newly widened Panama Canal. On top of that, we already move hundreds of tons of freight through Georgia's major logistics gateways every year, so establishing a local presence will make customs clearance and local trucking cheaper. Simply put, Atlanta is giving us added access to air, land and sea, plus some of the country's best and brightest talent." Flexport is invested in continued growth of company functions in Atlanta, and is excited to begin immediate recruiting for the Atlanta office. The company will be hiring for its sales, operations, customs, and small business development departments. Flexport Recruiting Partners are looking for folks with a client-first mentality, strong communication skills and an entrepreneurial spirit and are interested in meeting Georgia's top talent from universities like Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology. Interested candidates should reach out to Kristen Hayward, Global VP of Recruiting for Flexport, Kristen.Hayward@flexport.com and check out Flexport.com/Careers. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/flexport-announces-fourth-us-office-opening-in-atlanta-300452427.html


News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas' governor said Friday that he sees no reason for anything beyond a routine review of the state's execution procedures after a condemned inmate lurched and convulsed 20 times during a lethal injection that involved a controversial sedative. Attorneys for Kenneth Williams called for a full investigation after Williams became the fourth convicted killer executed in Arkansas in eight days as the state sought to carry out as many lethal injections as possible before its supply of midazolam expires. "I think it's totally unjustified," Gov. Asa Hutchinson told reporters when asked about the possibility of an independent probe. "You don't call for an independent investigation unless there's some reason for it. Last night, one of the goals was there not be any indications of pain by the inmate, and that's what I believe is the case." A federal judge on Friday granted a request from Williams' attorneys to preserve evidence from the dead inmate's body, ordering the state to collect blood and tissue samples as well as request an autopsy from the state medical examiner. Hutchinson said Williams' execution will be reviewed by the Department of Correction, which is typical any time an inmate is put to death. He said a written report would not be issued. The governor said he does not think Arkansas needs to change its execution protocol, citing court rulings that have upheld the use of midazolam, which has also been used in flawed executions in other states. But he has not ordered prison officials to find a replacement for Arkansas' supply of the drug, which expires Sunday. An Associated Press reporter who witnessed the execution said that about three minutes in, Williams' body jerked 15 times in quick succession, lurching violently against the leather restraint across his chest. Then the rate slowed for a final five movements. Hutchinson said Arkansas Department of Correction Director Wendy Kelley described Williams' movement as "coughing without noise," though media witnesses described hearing sounds from the inmate. Williams' attorneys released a statement calling the witness accounts "horrifying." The American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas also called for an investigation, arguing that the state may have violated the Eighth Amendment's prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment. In a statement Friday, the organization's executive director, Rita Sklar, said the governor had "ignored the dangers ... all to beat the expiration date on a failed drug." Arkansas had planned eight executions over an 11-day period, the most ambitious schedule since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976. But courts issued stays for four of the inmates. The four lethal injections that were carried out included Monday's first double execution in the U.S. since 2000. Williams read a prepared final statement and also spoke in tongues, the unintelligible speech used in some religions. But his prayer faded off as the midazolam took effect. The inmate breathed heavily through his nose until just after three minutes into his execution, when his chest leaped forward in a series of what seemed like involuntary movements. His right hand never clenched, and his face remained what one media witness called "serene." After the jerking, Williams breathed through his mouth and moaned or groaned once — during a consciousness check — until falling still seven minutes after the lethal injection. In a log of Williams' final hours that the state filed in federal court Friday, prison officials said it took 17 minutes to connect the inmate's IV lines. The log said Williams' hands remained relaxed and he did not grimace or show distress on his face during the movement. The state's court filing also included affidavits from two witnesses who said they did not see any signs of pain or suffering. "I saw an efficient, effective execution process," state Sen. Trent Garner said. Williams was sentenced to death for killing a former deputy warden, Cecil Boren, after he escaped from prison in 1999. At the time of his escape in a 500-gallon barrel of hog slop, Williams was less than three weeks into a life term for the death of a college cheerleader. A doctor who has been described by inmates' attorneys as an expert on the potential dangers of midazolam said Williams' movements raised concerns. "It was either a seizure that was predictable based upon Mr. Williams' co-existing medical conditions or partial paralysis in an execution where the protocol itself was not followed," said Dr. Joel Zivot, an associate professor of anesthesiology and surgery at Emory University. "Or, more to the point, even if the protocol was followed, the protocol was fundamentally flawed." Williams' lawyers had said he had sickle-cell trait, lupus and brain damage, and argued that the combined maladies could subject him to an exceptionally painful execution in violation of the Constitution. The state argued in a court filing Friday that there's no proof that Williams suffered. "The drugs worked as intended and planned," the court filing said. Some concerns had been raised about Monday's execution of Jack Jones, whose mouth moved after attorneys said he should have been unconscious, though a federal judge determined it did not appear to be "torturous and inhumane." All of the Arkansas inmates — including Williams — died within 20 minutes, a contrast from troubled midazolam-related executions in other states that took from 43 minutes to two hours. Witnesses to those lengthier executions also described hearing inmates breathe heavily, snore or snort or seeing them struggle against their restraints. Associated Press writers Claudia Lauer in Dallas and Jill Bleed contributed to this report. Follow Kelly P. Kissel at www.twitter.com/kisselAP and Andrew DeMillo on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ademillo .


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

With a veritable variety of sights and sounds, tasty authentic cuisine from around the world, a kid-zone with multiple carnival rides, costumed characters and much more, an international artisan market, retail vendors, a veggie festival, musical, cultural and dance performances, street performers, this event had something for everyone to enjoy. Special thanks to all of the event sponsors including Coca-Cola, UPS, Delta Airlines, Georgia Natural Gas, Emory University and so many others who took a leap of faith in supporting this first-time event and to the over 200 volunteers who worked tirelessly through every phase of this project from planning & promotion to working the event. As a 501(c)3 non-profit, the AINM Foundation's "Taste the World" message is one of celebrating diversity, inclusion, community & culture with the goal of opening the hearts and minds of participants to embrace the diversity of the human family. AINM believes that learning about other culture's food, performances, games, and traditions is an important way that we can help bring about real positive change in our global community. We'll see YOU at the next ATLANTA INTERNATIONAL NIGHT MARKET, Nov. 3-5, 2017! MEDIA OUTLETS: Please download the event photos here: http://AtlNightMarket.org/AINM-Photos.zip To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/over-52000-gather-for-premier-multi-cultural-event-celebrating-diversity-300446189.html


Dr. Kevin Hogan, a general dentist, is pleased to announce he is now accepting new patients interested in cosmetic dentistry treatment with or without a referral. Patients can receive orthodontics, dental implants and teeth whitening in Mt. Pleasant, SC to brighten their smiles and their confidence. The goal of cosmetic dentistry is to improve the aesthetic benefits of a smile. Dr. Hogan takes cosmetic treatment one step further to also improve function and oral health, whenever possible. In some cases, Dr. Hogan may recommend a complete smile makeover, or full mouth reconstruction, for more thorough treatment. Teeth whitening in Mt. Pleasant, SC is frequently a preferred cosmetic treatment and can provide a drastic improvement to a patient’s smile. At-home treatment often takes weeks, if not months, before producing desired results. Dr. Hogan offers professional, dental-grade whitening treatment for not only faster, more convenient treatment, but long-lasting care as well. Beyond whitening treatments, Dr. Hogan is skilled in offering personalized, porcelain veneers. This treatment can provide an affordable smile transformation without braces or surgery. Those with missing teeth can limit further tooth loss and restore oral function by opting for a permanent tooth replacement option, dental implants. For simple to substantial tooth straightening, Dr. Hogan provides a variety of orthodontic options including clear braces and aligners for discreet treatment. Dr. Hogan and his team are dedicated to providing modern cutting-edge treatments for effective and long-lasting care. Patients who would like to receive custom cosmetic treatment including porcelain veneers or teeth whitening in Mt. Pleasant, SC, are invited to contact Dr. Hogan’s office by calling 843-639-5921. Dr. Kevin Hogan is a general dentist providing individualized care for patients in Mt. Pleasant, SC. Dr. Hogan is a graduate of the Indiana University School of Dentistry and has completed hundreds of hours of continuing education courses to stay contemporary with the latest dental technologies. In addition, he has also completed coursework with the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation and has lectured at the University of North Carolina, Emory University, the Saginaw Valley University and AUA-American University of Antigua on head and neck anatomy and oral pathology. Dr. Hogan is a member of the American Dental Association, International College of Cranio-Mandibular Orthopedics, Academy of Laser Dentistry, International Association of Physiologic Aesthetics, Institute for Advanced Laser Dentistry, DOCS (the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation), International Congress of Oral Implantologists and the South Carolina Dental Association. He is also a past member of the American Straight Wire Orthodontic Association, Maxillofacial Orthopedic Growth and Development, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the Functional Orthodontic Society. He and his team are dedicated to providing exceptional oral care to patients through personalized treatment plans. To learn more about the services offered by Dr. Hogan, please visit his website at http://www.smilesbyhogan.com or call 843-639-5921.


Davis is a member of the firm's Management Committee and national chair of Fish's Diversity Initiative.  Outside the office, he is a regular speaker on patent issues, and is an instructor for the National Institute of Trial Advocacy.  He received his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center in 1999, his M.S. in chemistry from Emory University in 1996, and his B.S., cum laude, in chemistry from Morehouse College in 1994. Fellowship in the LCA is highly selective and by invitation only, with Fellows selected based upon excellence and accomplishment in litigation, both at the trial and appellate levels, and superior ethical reputation.  Established as a trial and appellate lawyer honorary society reflecting the American bar in the twenty-first century, the LCA represents the best in law among its membership.  The number of Fellowships has been kept at an exclusive limit by design, with recognition of excellence in litigation across all segments of the bar. Fish & Richardson is a global patent prosecution, intellectual property litigation, and commercial litigation law firm with more than 400 attorneys and technology specialists in the U.S. and Europe.  Fish is the #1 U.S. patent litigation firm, handling nearly three times more cases than its nearest competitor; a powerhouse patent prosecution firm; a top-tier trademark and copyright firm; and the #1 firm at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, with more cases than any other firm. Since 1878, Fish attorneys have been winning cases worth billions in controversy – often by making new law – for the world's most innovative and influential technology leaders.  For more information, visit https://www.fr.com or follow us at @FishRichardson. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fish--richardson-principal-ahmed-j-davis-named-fellow-of-litigation-counsel-of-america-300440284.html


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

With the U.S. Senate on April 10 having confirmed Justice Neil Gorsuch, the Supreme Court has nine justices for the first time in more than a year and is currently hearing oral arguments. Beginning in May, it will meet at 10 a.m. Eastern every Monday to release opinions, including some cases of which the court has waited to hear until a new justice was confirmed following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016. Available to provide commentary on the Supreme Court’s opinions is attorney Simon Bloom, who has tried high-stakes civil matters at both the state and federal level throughout the nation. Nationally recognized as a leading litigator and student of constitutional law, Bloom has served for nine years as an adjunct professor at Emory University School of Law and has been interviewed multiple times by Atlanta television news stations and print media. Please let us know if we may connect you with Bloom for an interview this week. “The court will soon be releasing a number of important decisions on matters that will carry great impact throughout our polarized nation,” Bloom said. “The public needs educated legal commentators to help to explain to business and individuals what these cases will mean for them going forward.” Bloom, whose political and legal beliefs most align with the philosophy of libertarianism, has a sharp mind and gift for expression, distilling the highly technical to the easily digestible, making him an ideal legal commentator. He can inform readers, listeners and viewers with his analysis on important issues before the country, including: For more information on Bloom, please visit http://www.bloomsugarman.com/professionals/simon-h-bloom-partner/


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: phys.org

Most tumors contain regions of low oxygen concentration where cancer therapies based on the action of reactive oxygen species are ineffective. Now, American scientists have developed a hybrid nanomaterial that releases a free-radical-generating prodrug inside tumor cells upon thermal activation. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the free radicals destroy the cell components even in oxygen-depleted conditions, causing apoptosis. Delivery, release, and action of the hybrid material can be precisely controlled. Many well-established cancer treatment schemes are based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which induce apoptosis for the tumor cells. However, this mechanism only works in the presence of oxygen, and hypoxic (oxygen-depleted) regions in the tumor tissue often survive the ROS-based treatment. Therefore, Younan Xia at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, USA, and his team have developed a strategy to deliver and release a radical-generating prodrug that, upon activation, damages cells by a ROS-type radical mechanism, but without the need for oxygen. The authors explained that they had to turn to the field of polymerization chemistry to find a compound that produces enough radicals. There, the azo compound AIPH is a well-known polymerization initiator. In medicinal applications, it generates free alkyl radicals that cause DNA damage and lipid and protein peroxidation in cells even under hypoxic conditions. However, the AIPH must be safely delivered to the cells in the tissue. Thus, the scientists used nanocages, the cavities of which were filled with lauric acid, a so-called phase-change material (PCM) that can serve as a carrier for AIPH. Once inside the target tissue, irradiation by a near-infrared laser heats up the nanocages, causing the PCM to melt and triggering the release and decomposition of AIPH. This concept worked well, as the team has shown with a variety of experiments on different cell types and components. Red blood cells underwent pronounced hemolysis. Lung cancer cells incorporated the nanoparticles and were severely damaged by the triggered release of the radical starter. Actin filaments retracted and condensed following the treatment. And the lung cancer cells showed significant inhibition of their growth rate, independently of the oxygen concentration. Although the authors admit that "the efficacy still needs to be improved by optimizing the components and conditions involved," they have demonstrated the effectiveness of their hybrid system in killing cells, also in places where the oxygen level is low. This strategy might be highly relevant in nanomedicine, cancer theranostics, and in all applications where targeted delivery and controlled release with superb spatial/temporal resolutions is desired. Explore further: New drug delivery system shows promise for fighting solid tumors More information: Song Shen et al, A Hybrid Nanomaterial for the Controlled Generation of Free Radicals and Oxidative Destruction of Hypoxic Cancer Cells, Angewandte Chemie International Edition (2017). DOI: 10.1002/anie.201702898


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE- In this April 18, 2017, file photo, Democratic candidate for Georgia's Sixth Congressional Seat Jon Ossoff speaks to supporters during an election-night watch party in Dunwoody, Ga. A federal judge on Thursday, May 4, ordered Georgia officials to reopen voter registration in a suburban Atlanta congressional district ahead of a runoff in a heated special election between Ossoff and Republican Karen Handel. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File) ATLANTA (AP) — A federal judge on Thursday ordered Georgia officials to reopen voter registration in a suburban Atlanta congressional district ahead of a heated special election that's seen by many as a test of President Donald Trump's influence. U.S. District Judge Timothy Batten ruled in favor of civil rights advocacy groups who argued that Georgia violated federal law by preventing more new voter registrations before the June 20 runoff. Georgia had set the registration deadline on March 20, 30 days before the first round of voting in April. Democrat Jon Ossoff and Republican Karen Handel, the top two vote-getters, advanced to a runoff in the conservative 6th District. Democrats hope Ossoff, who came within 2 percentage points of outright victory in the first round, can upset Handel in the tight race. Trump raised funds for Handel in a recent Atlanta visit. Batten, who was appointed by former President George W. Bush in 2005, ordered the state to extend the deadline to May 21 and to allow any district resident registered by that day to cast a ballot in the runoff. He said he wouldn't order the state to publicize the change but that he expects the Secretary of State, Georgia's top elections official, to update his website with the new information. Candice Broce, a spokeswoman for Secretary of State Brian Kemp, said the state will comply with the judge's order. Batten said in court that his Thursday order only applies to the June runoff and not to future elections. Jill Boyd Myers, one of the people on whose behalf the lawsuit was filed, moved from Atlanta to suburban Sandy Springs in the 6th District two days after the March 20 registration cutoff. Despite having been registered to vote in Georgia since she moved here from Ohio in 2011, she was upset to learn she wouldn't be eligible to vote in the runoff. "This just felt like a real prohibition of our rights as citizens," she said after the hearing, adding that she was thrilled with the judge's ruling. Attorneys for the state argued that federal law allows states to determine voters' qualifications, including registration deadlines. The state constitution defines a runoff election as a "continuation of the general election," and allows only those eligible to vote in the initial election to cast a ballot in the runoff, attorneys wrote in court documents laying out the state's argument. "It's one contest with one electorate," state attorney Josiah Heidt told the judge. Georgia's attorneys also provided declarations from state and local election officials, who were concerned that a last-minute change would leave little time before the runoff to prepare. Batten acknowledged the arguments that it would be difficult for the state to be ready in time, but said he saw nothing to show it would be impossible. Chris Harvey, director of the state's Division of Elections, said in a court filing that a new registration deadline would force rapid testing by the equipment vendor and the Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems before early voting begins on May 30. That could raise the risk of a "serious mistake" that damages the election's integrity, he wrote. The Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, a Washington-based advocacy group that sued on behalf of civil rights organizations, argued that the state has been aware of their concerns since the end of March. "We're talking about taking away the right to cast a ballot in a very important election regardless of who you are," Julie Houk, with the Lawyers' Committee, said in court. Kate Constantini, a spokeswoman for Handel's campaign, sees the lawsuit as a partisan maneuver. "When the Democrats can't win following the rules — rules they themselves authored and enforced — they file partisan lawsuits to change them," Constantini said in an email. "This lawsuit should be seen for exactly what it is: A partisan attempt to change the rules for a nakedly partisan outcome." Ossoff, in an emailed statement, urged all voters to exercise their rights. "Voting rights are constitutional rights," he said. "I encourage all eligible voters to ensure that they are registered and make their voices heard on June 20th and in all elections, regardless of their party or political persuasion." Emory University political science professor Alan Abramowitz predicted the decision will benefit Ossoff more than Handel. He said Republicans will be older, longtime residents and more likely to be registered already. Democrats can cultivate a growing number of Latino or Asian-American residents who have moved into the district in recent years but aren't yet registered, he said. "Everything points to this being a very close race, and it's likely to be decided by one or two points," Abramowitz said. "Even a few hundred new voters could conceivably tip the balance."


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ATLANTA--A certain cytokine, or small protein that helps cells communicate during immune responses, can control whether immune cells promote or suppress inflammatory bowel disease, a finding that could lead to new treatments, according to a study led by Georgia State University. Inflammatory bowel disease, chronic inflammation of all or part of the digestive tract, affects about 1.5 million Americans. The two main types, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, develop from uncontrolled inflammation in the intestine, which can lead to severe diarrhea, pain, fatigue, weight loss and even death. Researchers from Georgia State, Emory University and University of Michigan found the cytokine IL-36γ controls whether T cells, which play an active role in immune responses, become aggressive or suppressive. They discovered IL-36γ promoted the development of a specific type of T helper cell, Th9, which is associated with several diseases, including asthma, cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. The findings are published in the journal Mucosal Immunology. "We were very intrigued whether the cytokine we were studying, IL-36γ, could be promoting intestinal inflammation through the development of these Th9 cells, and that's in fact what we found," said Dr. Tim Denning, lead author and associate professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State. "When we were discovering this, we also found it simultaneously inhibits a suppressive population of T cells termed regulatory T cells or Tregs, which are known to suppress inflammatory bowel disease." "Our conclusions were that IL-36γ plays a critical role in driving the differentiation of pro-inflammatory Th9 cells and inhibiting the development of the suppressive Tregs. We think this can have major implications in the treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis, which has been shown to be associated with Th9 cells." In a previous study, the researchers identified the cytokine IL-36γ as being highly expressed in the inflamed intestine of mice and humans. They found IL-36γ played a dual function, driving some of the pro-inflammatory process that aided in wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease. The current study investigated the pro-inflammatory function of IL-36γ in mice to determine how IL-36γ functions in human inflammatory bowel disease. The researchers performed in vitro and in vivo experiments in mice. In the future, the researchers will investigate how to block the ability of IL-36γ to bind to its receptor. "If we can block the interaction of this cytokine with its receptor, we may be able to inhibit all of this cascade that we have defined and potentially develop a therapeutic for patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis," Denning said. Co-authors of the study include Dr. Jian-Dong Li, Dr. Andrew Gewirtz, A. Harusato, H. Abo, V.L. Ngo, S.W. Yi and K. Mitsutake of Georgia State; S. Osuka and J.E. Kohlmeier of Emory University; and A. Nusrat of University of Michigan. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Raisa Ahmad was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which she conducted research and prepared memos for patent litigation cases involving software and security patents, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical devices.  In addition, she has experience preparing claim construction charts, invalidity contentions, and Lanham Act standing memos.  Prior to law school, she was a student engineer and conducted electric-cell substrate impedance sensing analysis for the Center for the Convergence of Physical and Cancer Biology.  Ahmad received her J.D. from the University of Arizona College of Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor for the Arizona Law Review and received the Dean's Achievement Award Scholarship.  She received her B.S.E., magna cum laude, in biomedical engineering from Arizona State University in 2011.  She is admitted to practice in Texas. Brian Apel practices patent litigation, including post-grant proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  He has worked for clients in the mechanical, electrical, and chemical industries and has experience in pre-suit diligence including opinion work, discovery, damages, summary judgment, and appeals.  Apel also has experience in patent prosecution, employment discrimination, and First Amendment law.  Before law school, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy.  Apel received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Michigan Law School in 2016 and his B.A., with honors, in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2008.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota, the U.S. District Court of Minnesota, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Zoya Kovalenko Brooks focuses her practice on patent litigation, including working on teams for one of the largest high-tech cases in the country pertaining to data transmission and memory allocation technologies.  She was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  While in law school, she served as a legal extern at The Coca-Cola Company in the IP group.  Prior to attending law school, she was an investigator intern at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where she investigated over 20 potential discrimination cases.  Brooks received her J.D., high honors, Order of the Coif, from Emory University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor for Emory Law Journal and her B.S., high honors, in applied mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Georgia. Holly Chamberlain focuses on patent prosecution in a variety of areas including the biomedical, mechanical, and electromechanical arts.  She was previously a summer associate with the firm.  She received her J.D. from Boston College Law School in 2016 where she was an editor of Intellectual Property and Technology Forum and her B.S. in biological engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Thomas Chisena previously was a summer associate with the firm where he worked on patent, trade secret, and trademark litigation.  Prior to attending law school, he instructed in biology, environmental science, and anatomy & physiology.  Chisena received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where he was executive editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, Vol. 37.  He also received his Wharton Certificate in Business Management in December 2015.  He received his B.S. in biology from Pennsylvania State University in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Claire Collins was a legal intern for the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office during law school.  She has experience researching and drafting motions and legal memorandums.  Collins received her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2016 where she was a Dillard Fellow, her M.A. from Texas A&M University in 2012, and her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 2006.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts. Ronald Golden, III previously served as a courtroom deputy to U.S. District Judge Leonard P. Stark and U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Pat Thynge.  He received his J.D. from Widener University School of Law in 2012 where he was on the staff of Widener Law Review and was awarded "Best Overall Competitor" in the American Association for Justice Mock Trial.  He received his B.A. from Stockton University in political science and criminal justice in 2005.  He is admitted to practice in Delaware and New Jersey. Dr. Casey Kraning-Rush was previously a summer associate with the firm, where she focused primarily on patent litigation.  She received her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where she was managing editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and awarded "Best Advocate" and "Best Appellee Brief" at the Western Regional of the AIPLA Giles Rich Moot Court.  She earned her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2013 and has extensive experience researching cellular and molecular medicine.  She received her M.S. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2012 and her B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Butler University in 2008.  She is admitted to practice in Delaware. Alana Mannigé was previously a summer associate with the firm and has worked on patent prosecution, patent litigation, trademark, and trade secret matters.  During law school, she served as a judicial extern to the Honorable Judge James Donato of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.  She also worked closely with biotech startup companies as part of her work at the UC Hastings Startup Legal Garage.  Prior to attending law school, Mannigé worked as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor of Hastings Science & Technology Law Journal.  She received her M.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 2010 and her B.A., cum laude, in chemistry from Clark University in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in California and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Will Orlady was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he collaborated to research and brief a matter on appeal to the Federal Circuit.  He also analyzed novel issues related to inter partes review proceedings, drafted memoranda on substantive patent law issues, and crafted infringement contentions.  During law school, Orlady was a research assistant to Professor Kristin Hickman, researching and writing on administrative law.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2016 where he was lead articles editor of the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science and Technology and his B.A. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California in 2012.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota and the U.S. District Court of Minnesota. Jessica Perry previously was a summer associate and law clerk with the firm, where she worked on patent and trademark litigation.  During law school, she was an IP & licensing analyst, in which she assisted with drafting and tracking material transfer agreement and inter-institutional agreements.  She also worked with the Boston University Civil Litigation Clinic representing pro bono clients with unemployment, social security, housing, and family law matters.  Prior to law school, she was a senior mechanical design engineer for an aerospace company.  She received her J.D. from Boston University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor of the Journal of Science and Technology Law, her M.Eng. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009, and her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Taufiq Ramji was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he researched legal issues that related to ongoing litigation and drafted responses to discovery requests and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actions.  Prior to attending law school, Ramji worked as a software developer.  He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2016.  He is admitted to practice in California. Charles Reese has worked on matters before various federal district courts, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.  His litigation experience includes drafting dispositive, evidentiary, and procedural motions; arguing in federal district court; and participating in other stages of litigation including discovery, appeal, and settlement negotiation.  Previously, he was a summer associate with the firm.  He received his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Harvard Law Review, his A.M. in organic and organometallic chemistry from Harvard University in 2012, and his B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Furman University in 2010.  He is admitted to practice in Georgia and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Ethan Rubin was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  During law school, he worked at a corporation's intellectual property department in which he prepared and prosecuted patents relating to data storage systems.  He also worked as a student attorney, advocating for local pro bono clients on various housing and family law matters.  Rubin received his J.D., cum laude, from Boston College Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Boston College Law Review, his M.S. in computer science from Boston University in 2013, and his B.A., magna cum laude, in criminal justice from George Washington University in 2011.  He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Pooya Shoghi focuses on patent prosecution, including portfolio management, application drafting, client counseling, and standard essential patent development.  Prior to joining the firm, he was a patent practitioner at a multinational technology company, where he was responsible for the filing and prosecution of U.S. patent applications.  During law school, he was a legal intern at a major computer networking technology company, where he focused on issues of intellectual property licensing in the software arena.  He received his J.D., with honors, from Emory University School of Law in 2014 where he was executive managing editor of Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review.  He received his B.S., summa cum laude, in computer science (2015) and his B.A., summa cum laude, in political science (2011) from Georgia State University.  He is admitted to practice in New York and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Tucker Terhufen focuses his practice on patent litigation in federal district courts as well as before the International Trade Commission for clients in the medical devices, life sciences, chemical, and electronics industries.  Prior to joining Fish, he served as judicial extern to the Honorable David G. Campbell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona and to the Honorable Mary H. Murguia of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from Arizona State University, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law in 2016 where he was note and comment editor of Arizona State Law Journal and received a Certificate in Law, Science, and Technology with a specialization in Intellectual Property.  He received his B.S.E., summa cum laude, in chemical engineering from Arizona State University.  He is admitted to practice in California. Laura Whitworth was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, she served as a judicial intern for the Honorable Judge Jimmie V. Reyna of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  She received her J.D., cum laude, from American University Washington College of Law in 2016 where she was senior federal circuit editor of American University Law Review and senior patent editor of Intellectual Property Brief.  She received her B.S. in chemistry from the College of William & Mary in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Virginia, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Jack Wilson was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, he served as a judicial extern for the Honorable Mark Davis of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  Prior to attending law school, he served in the United States Army.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from William & Mary Law School in 2016 where he was on the editorial staff of William & Mary Law Review and his B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Virginia in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Virginia and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Fish & Richardson is a global patent prosecution, intellectual property litigation, and commercial litigation law firm with more than 400 attorneys and technology specialists in the U.S. and Europe.  Our success is rooted in our creative and inclusive culture, which values the diversity of people, experiences, and perspectives.  Fish is the #1 U.S. patent litigation firm, handling nearly three times as many cases than its nearest competitor; a powerhouse patent prosecution firm; a top-tier trademark and copyright firm; and the #1 firm at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, with more cases than any other firm.  Since 1878, Fish attorneys have been winning cases worth billions in controversy – often by making new law – for the world's most innovative and influential technology leaders.  For more information, visit https://www.fr.com or follow us at @FishRichardson. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fish--richardson-announces-18-recent-associates-300447237.html


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

The New York Times first reported Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's association with spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former rabbi accused of sexual abuse. The Times reported Gafni describing one of his accusers: "She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her." The Washington Post reported on protests at Whole Foods stores in New York City and Los Angeles. Mackey issued a statement of loyalty to Gafni. ​​​An alliance of anti-sexual violence groups that includes Bay Area Women Against Rape (BAWAR) is organizing a protest at an event featuring Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, presented by the Commonwealth Club of California. Mackey is set to appear in conversation with Alison van Diggelen, BBC contributor and host of  "Fresh Dialogues," at the Cubberley Theatre in Palo Alto on May 1. Advocacy leaders from organizations including the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV) and Faculty Against Rape (FAR) have called for “sexual violence accountability,” urging Mackey to disavow spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former New York rabbi accused of sexual abuse. Gafni is leader of San Francisco Bay Area-based think tank The Center for Integral Wisdom. "Please urge the Commonwealth Club to hold Whole Foods CEO John Mackey accountable and cancel his appearance. Call 415-597–6700, email CEO Gloria Duffy, gduffy@commonwealthclub.org, or tweet at @cwclub." Mackey was originally set to appear in conversation with Dr. Dean Ornish. Van Diggelen replaced Ornish on the event announcement earlier this week, after Ornish asked advocacy groups to stop "heckling" Mackey about his association with Gafni. Mackey's involvement with Gafni was first reported by The New York Times in December 2015. The Times reported Gafni describing one of his accusers: “Mr. Gafni was quoted saying they had been in love. He added, ‘She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her.’” “A co-founder of Whole Foods, John Mackey, a proponent of conscious capitalism, calls Mr. Gafni ‘a bold visionary.’ He is a chairman of the executive board of Mr. Gafni’s center, and he hosts board meetings at his Texas ranch.” The New York Daily News reported Gafni denying allegations. According to the News, Gafni stated his underage accusers in the 1980s, then 13 and 16, were willing partners. More than 100 rabbis and Jewish leaders undersigned a petition to Whole Foods, citing “many, repeated and serious allegations, both public and private, former and recent, against Marc (Mordechai) Gafni.” Sara Kabakov identified herself as the then-girl whom Gafni described as "14 going on 35." She came forward publicly for the first time in an opinion piece in the Forward: "I Was 13 When Marc Gafni's Abuse Began." The Washington Post reported on coordinated protests at Whole Foods stores in New York City and Los Angeles in May 2016. “I have known Marc Gafni for several years, and he has continued to tell me that he is innocent of the allegations being made about him. Loyalty and the presumption of innocence are important values to me, so I will not join those who are condemning him.” An undated "Marc Gafni Statement" on the Whole Foods Market Newsroom says Mackey is no longer on the board of directors of Gafni's center. Mackey's Whole Foods Market Blog was edited in June to say his involvement with Gafni is now "strictly a personal relationship." In November, soon after Donald Trump's vulgar brag "grab them by the p***y" made headlines, Gafni tweeted: "Donald Trump is an Outrageous Lover." An open letter from 130 advocates urged "sexual violence accountability," asking Mackey to disavow Gafni. Addressed to board member of Whole Foods and Conscious Capitalism, Inc. (a business ethics nonprofit organization Mackey founded), the open letter was published by Feminine Collective and signed by advocacy leaders, university professors, and students. In February 2017, a consortium of advocacy groups organized a protest at Mackey's keynote speech at Conscious Capitalism, Inc. in San Francisco, where the organization is headquartered. The February protest was organized by Peaceful Hearts Foundation (nonprofit founded by Matthew Sandusky, one of six adopted children of former Penn State coach, convicted pedophile Jerry Sandusky), the Stop Abuse Campaign, Protect NY Kids, and SNAP, Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, the organization featured in the Oscar-winning movie Spotlight. Protest speakers included members of RAINN Speakers Bureau, from the country's largest anti-sexual violence organization. Business and ethics experts, including professors from Harvard Business School, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and Emory University, have criticized Mackey's association with Gafni. "April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's loyalty to Marc Gafni is a perfect example of rape culture. Minimizing and normalizing sexual assault is emblematic of rape culture. It takes a village to enable a sexual predator, it takes a village to stop rape culture. Mackey needs to disavow Gafni. Accountability matters. Ending rape culture is on all of us." Gafni has never been charged with a crime. According to Andrew Willis, CEO of the Stop Abuse Campaign, Gafni is protected by New York state's statute of limitations laws, among the most restrictive in the country. Governor Andrew Cuomo announced his support for the Child Victims Act, proposed legislation to eliminate statutes of limitations for claims of child sexual abuse. A petition to state lawmakers in support of the bill has garnered nearly 70,000 signatures. UPDATE: The Commonwealth Club has responded by blocking advocates on Twitter. BAWAR, based in Oakland, California, is the country's first rape crisis center, founded in 1971.


The New York Times first reported Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's association with spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former rabbi accused of sexual abuse. The Times reported Gafni describing one of his accusers: "She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her." The Washington Post reported on protests at Whole Foods stores in NYC and LA. Mackey issued a statement of loyalty to Gafni. A consortium of anti-sexual violence groups led by Bay Area Women Against Rape (BAWAR) has issued a public "Call to Action," urging the Commonwealth Club of California to cancel the appearance of Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, scheduled for May 1. Mackey is set to appear at the Cubberley Theatre in Palo Alto, in conversation with Alison van Diggelen, host of "Fresh Dialogues, and BBC contributor.​ Advocacy leaders from organizations including the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV) and Faculty Against Rape (FAR) have called for “sexual violence accountability,” urging Mackey to disavow spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former New York rabbi accused of sexual abuse. Gafni is leader of San Francisco Bay Area-based think tank The Center for Integral Wisdom.​ [UPDATE NOTE: ​Mackey was originally set to appear in conversation with Dr. Dean Ornish. After BAWAR issued this Call to Action, Ornish was replaced by van Diggelen on the program announcement. Neither the Commonwealth Club nor Ornish have responded to inquiries about reasons for his departure from the program. Dean Ornish had asked advocacy groups to stop "heckling" Mackey about his association with Gafni.] Please urge the Commonwealth Club to hold Whole Foods CEO John Mackey accountable and cancel his appearance. Call 415-597–6700, email CEO Gloria Duffy, gduffy@commonwealthclub.org, or tweet at @cwclub Mackey's involvement with Gafni was first reported by The New York Times in December 2015. The Times reported Gafni describing one of his accusers: “Mr. Gafni was quoted saying they had been in love. He added, ‘She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her.’” “A co-founder of Whole Foods, John Mackey, a proponent of conscious capitalism, calls Mr. Gafni ‘a bold visionary.’ He is a chairman of the executive board of Mr. Gafni’s center, and he hosts board meetings at his Texas ranch.” The New York Daily News reported Gafni denying allegations. According to the News, Gafni stated his underage accusers in the 1980s, then 13 and 16, were willing partners. More than 100 rabbis and Jewish leaders undersigned a petition to Whole Foods, citing “many, repeated and serious allegations, both public and private, former and recent, against Marc (Mordechai) Gafni.” Sara Kabakov identified herself as the then-girl whom Gafni described as "14 going on 35." She came forward publicly for the first time in an opinion piece in the Forward: "I Was 13 When Marc Gafni's Abuse Began." The Washington Post reported on coordinated protests at Whole Foods stores in New York City and Los Angeles in May 2016. Mackey issued a statement of loyalty to Gafni in June. As reported by the Forward, Mackey said: “I have known Marc Gafni for several years, and he has continued to tell me that he is innocent of the allegations being made about him. Loyalty and the presumption of innocence are important values to me, so I will not join those who are condemning him.” An undated "Marc Gafni Statement" on the Whole Foods Market Newsroom says Mackey is no longer on the board of directors of Gafni's center. Mackey's Whole Foods Market Blog was edited in June to say his involvement with Gafni is now "strictly a personal relationship." In November, soon after Donald Trump's vulgar brag "grab them by the p***y" made headlines, Gafni tweeted: "Donald Trump is an Outrageous Lover." In December 2016, an open letter from 130 advocates urged "sexual violence accountability," asking Mackey to disavow Gafni. Addressed to board member of Whole Foods and Conscious Capitalism, Inc. (a business ethics nonprofit organization Mackey founded), the open letter was published by Feminine Collective and signed by advocacy leaders, university professors, and students. In February 2017, a consortium of advocacy groups organized a protest at Mackey's keynote speech at Conscious Capitalism, Inc. in San Francisco, where the organization is headquartered. The protest was organized by Peaceful Hearts Foundation (nonprofit founded by Matthew Sandusky, one of six adopted children of former Penn State coach, convicted pedophile Jerry Sandusky), the Stop Abuse Campaign, Protect NY Kids, and SNAP, Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, the organization featured in the Oscar-winning movie Spotlight. Protest speakers included members of RAINN Speakers Bureau, from the country's largest anti-sexual violence organization,  [Watch video: former model, activist Nikki DuBose​ speaks at San Francisco protest]​​​ Business and ethics experts, including professors from Harvard Business School, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and Emory University, have criticized Mackey's association with Gafni. "April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's loyalty to Marc Gafni is a perfect example of rape culture -- enabling and protecting predators is the life blood of rape culture. It takes a village to enable a sexual predator, it takes a village to stop rape culture. The Commonwealth Club has an opportunity to be part of the solution. Mackey needs to disavow Gafni, or the Commonwealth Club should cancel his appearance. This is accountability. Ending rape culture is on all of us." Gafni has never been charged with a crime. According to Andrew Willis, CEO of the Stop Abuse Campaign, Gafni is protected by New York state's statutes of limitations laws. Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced his support for the Child Victims Act, proposed legislation to eliminate statutes of limitations for claims of child sexual abuse. A petition to state lawmakers urging passage of the bill has garnered nearly 70,000 signatures. "Would the Commonwealth Club be willing to demonstrate its support for survivors of sexual assault and child sexual abuse, and its commitment to changing the culture of sexual violence by canceling Mr. Mackey's scheduled appearance?" Please urge the Commonwealth Club to hold Whole Foods CEO John Mackey accountable and cancel his appearance. Call 415-597–6700, email CEO Gloria Duffy, gduffy@commonwealthclub.org, or tweet at @cwclub BAWAR is the country's first rape crisis center, founded in 1971.​


The New York Times first reported Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's association with spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former rabbi accused of sexual abuse. The Times reported Gafni describing one of his accusers: "She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her." The Washington Post reported on protests at Whole Foods stores in NYC and LA. Mackey issued a statement of loyalty to Gafni. A consortium of anti-sexual violence groups led by Bay Area Women Against Rape (BAWAR) has asked the Commonwealth Club of California to cancel the appearance of Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, scheduled for May 1. Mackey is set to appear at the Cubberley Theatre in Palo Alto, in conversation with Dr. Dean Ornish.​ Leaders from organizations including BAWAR and Peaceful Hearts Foundation (nonprofit founded by Matthew Sandusky, one of six adopted children of former Penn State coach, convicted pedophile Jerry Sandusky) emailed Commonwealth Club leaders, stating: "We request that Mackey publicly disavow Gafni, or that his talk at the Commonwealth Club be canceled." Advocacy leaders from organizations including the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV) and Faculty Against Rape (FAR), have called for “sexual violence accountability,” urging Mackey to disavow spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former New York rabbi accused of sexual abuse. Gafni is leader of San Francisco Bay Area-based think tank The Center for Integral Wisdom.​ Mackey's involvement with Gafni was first reported by The New York Times in December 2015. The Times reported Gafni describing one of his accusers: “Mr. Gafni was quoted saying they had been in love. He added, ‘She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her.’” “A co-founder of Whole Foods, John Mackey, a proponent of conscious capitalism, calls Mr. Gafni ‘a bold visionary.’ He is a chairman of the executive board of Mr. Gafni’s center, and he hosts board meetings at his Texas ranch.” The New York Daily News reported Gafni denying allegations. According to the News, Gafni stated his underage accusers in the 1980s, then 13 and 16, were willing partners. Sara Kabakov identified herself as the then-girl whom Gafni described as "14 going on 35." She came forward publicly for the first time in an opinion piece in the Forward: "I Was 13 When Marc Gafni's Abuse Began." More than 100 rabbis and Jewish leaders undersigned a petition to Whole Foods: “Stop Marc Gafni from Abusing Again.” The petition cited “many, repeated and serious allegations, both public and private, former and recent.” The Washington Post reported on coordinated protests at Whole Foods stores in New York City and Los Angeles in May 2016. Mackey issued a statement in June, as reported by the Forward. Mackey stated: “I have known Marc Gafni for several years, and he has continued to tell me that he is innocent of the allegations being made about him. Loyalty and the presumption of innocence are important values to me, so I will not join those who are condemning him.” According to an undated "Marc Gafni Statement" on the Whole Foods Market Newsroom site, Mackey is "no longer on the board of directors of the Center for Integral Wisdom." In November, soon after Donald Trump's vulgar brag "grab them by the p***y" made headlines, Gafni tweeted: "Donald Trump is an Outrageous Lover." In December, an open letter from 130 advocates to board members of Whole Foods and Conscious Capitalism, Inc. (a business ethics nonprofit organization Mackey co-founded) urged "sexual violence accountability." Published by Feminine Collective, the letter was signed by advocacy leaders, university professors, and students. In February 2017, a consortium of advocacy groups organized a protest at Mackey's keynote speech at Conscious Capitalism, Inc. in San Francisco, where the organization is headquartered. Organized by Peaceful Hearts Foundation, the Stop Abuse Campaign, and Protect NY Kids, protest speakers included members of RAINN Speakers Bureau, from the country's largest anti-sexual violence organization, and SNAP, Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, the organization featured in the Oscar-winning movie Spotlight. [Watch video: former model Nikki DuBose speaks at San Francisco protest]​​​ Business and ethics experts, including professors from Harvard Business School, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, Columbia University, and Emory University, have criticized Mackey's loyalty to Gafni. "April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's loyalty to Marc Gafni is a perfect example of rape culture -- enabling and protecting predators is the life blood of rape culture. It takes a village to enable a sexual predator, it takes a village to stop rape culture. The Commonwealth Club has an opportunity to be part of the solution. Mackey needs to disavow Gafni, or the Commonwealth Club should cancel his appearance. This is accountability. Ending rape culture is on all of us." Gafni has never been charged with a crime. He is exemplar on a petition to New York state lawmakers, urging them to pass the Child Victims Act, proposed statute of limitations reform for claims of child sexual abuse. The petition has garnered more than 69,000 signatures. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo pledged his support for the bill. In their email to the Commonwealth Club, advocacy leaders ask: "Would the Commonwealth Club be willing to demonstrate its support for survivors of sexual assault and child sexual abuse, and its commitment to changing the culture of sexual violence by canceling Mr. Mackey's scheduled appearance?" Advocates have issued a Call to Action: Please urge the Commonwealth Club to hold Mackey accountable and cancel his appearance. Call 415-597–6700 (live person answers) or tweet at @cwclub BAWAR is the country's first rape crisis center, founded in 1971.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Advocacy leaders have called for Whole Foods CEO John Mackey to disavow spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former rabbi accused of sexual abuse. The New York Times reported Gafni describing one of his alleged victims: "She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her." A consortium of anti-sexual violence advocacy groups has asked publishing company the Hachette Book Group to cancel its release of Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's book The Whole Foods Diet, scheduled for April 11. Led by Peaceful Hearts Foundation (a nonprofit organization founded by Matthew Sandusky, one of six adopted children of Jerry Sandusky, former Penn State coach and convicted pedophile), advocacy leaders emailed executives at the Hachette Book Group, stating: "We ask that Hachette Book Group follow the industry precedent set by Simon & Schuster, which cancelled publication of Milo Yiannopoulos' book because of comments he made about pedophilia. We ask that Hachette Book Group likewise act in good conscience and cancel the release of Mackey's book." Advocacy leaders from organizations including the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV) and Faculty Against Rape (FAR), have called for “sexual violence accountability,” urging Mackey to disavow spiritual leader Marc Gafni, a former rabbi accused of sexual abuse. Gafni is leader of San Francisco Bay Area-based think tank The Center for Integral Wisdom. Mackey's involvement with Gafni was first reported by The New York Times in December 2015, and subsequently by The Washington Post in May 2016. The Times reported Gafni describing one of his accusers: “Mr. Gafni was quoted saying they had been in love. He added, ‘She was 14 going on 35, and I never forced her.’” “A co-founder of Whole Foods, John Mackey, a proponent of conscious capitalism, calls Mr. Gafni ‘a bold visionary.’ He is a chairman of the executive board of Mr. Gafni’s center, and he hosts board meetings at his Texas ranch.” More than 100 rabbis and Jewish leaders, led by New York Rabbi David Ingber, undersigned a petition to Whole Foods: “Stop Marc Gafni from Abusing Again,” citing “many, repeated and serious allegations, both public and private, former and recent.” Sara Kabakov, the then-girl whom Gafni described as "14 going on 35," came forward publicly for the first time in an opinion piece in the Forward: "I Was 13 When Marc Gafni's Abuse Began." After The Washington Post reported on protests at Whole Foods stores in New York City and Los Angeles in May, Mackey issued a statement, declaring his loyalty to Gafni, as reported by the Forward: "Whole Foods CEO Remains Loyal to Marc Gafni Despite Abuse Claims." Mackey stated: “Loyalty and the presumption of innocence are important values to me, so I will not join those who are condemning him.” In December 2016, advocacy leaders and university professors were among 130 signers of an open letter to board members of Whole Foods, urging "sexual violence accountability," asking Mackey to disavow Gafni. In February 2017, a consortium of advocacy groups organized a protest at Mackey's speech in San Francisco at Conscious Capitalism, Inc., a business ethics nonprofit organization he founded. Protest organizers included Bay Area Women Against Rape (BAWAR, the country's first rape crisis center), the Stop Abuse Campaign and Protect NY Kids. Protest speakers included members of RAINN Speakers Bureau, from the country's largest anti-sexual violence organization, and SNAP (Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, featured in the movie Spotlight about the cover-up of child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.) [Watch video: Former model Nikki DuBose, board member of Peaceful Hearts Foundation, speaks at protest at Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's speech in San Francisco.] Business and ethics experts, including professors from Harvard Business School, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and Emory University have criticized Mackey's loyalty to Gafni. Edward L. Queen, Director, Ethics and Servant Leadership Program, Center for Ethics, Emory University, said: "The CEO of Whole Foods has managed this horribly. While his latest [and only] statement is an improvement in that he finally acknowledges the pain and suffering caused by sexual abuse, he continues to fail to demonstrate the deep thoughtfulness of response these allegations warrant." Gafni has never been charged with a crime. He is exemplar on a petition to New York state lawmakers, urging them to pass the Child Victims Act, proposed statute of limitations reform for claims of child sexual abuse. The petition has garnered more than 69,000 signatures. In January, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo pledged his support for the bill. Andrew Willis, CEO of the Stop Abuse Campaign said: "New York state's statute of limitations laws, some of the strictest in the nation, protect sexual predators and not the children they prey on. Whole Foods CEO Mackey's statement of loyalty to Gafni, who is protected by statutes of limitations, perpetuates the culture of enabling. Mackey should disavow his friend." [Read on Feminine Collective: "Conscious Capitalism® Issues Statement On Whole Foods CEO Link To Alleged Sex Abuser"] The email to executives at the Hachette Book Group, sent on behalf of advocacy leaders by Bay Area author and activist Nancy Levine, asked: "To demonstrate support for survivors of sexual assault and child sexual abuse, and to change the culture of sexual violence, will Hachette Book Group cancel the planned release of John Mackey's book?"


Doreen Turner Inkeles, InkelesLaw, P.A., has joined The Expert Network©, an invitation-only service for distinguished professionals. Ms. Inkeles has been chosen as a Distinguished Lawyer™ based on peer reviews and ratings, dozens of recognitions, and accomplishments achieved throughout her career. Ms. Inkeles outshines others in her field due to her extensive educational background, numerous awards and recognitions, and career longevity. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in 1985 from Emory University and her Juris Doctor with Honors in 1992 from St. Thomas University School of Law where she served on Law Review. Ms. Inkeles has an AV® Preeminent™ rating from Martindale-Hubbell® and is a nationally recognized specialist in family law by the National Board of Trial Advocacy. With over 20 years dedicated to law, Ms. Inkeles brings a wealth of knowledge to her industry and in particular to her area of specialization, Family Law. When asked why she decided to pursue a career in law, Ms. Inkeles said: "Law emerged as the logical choice: it has enabled me to hone and sharpen my innate skill set, while at the same time helping people navigate through some of the most challenging and frustrating times of their lives." Ms. Inkeles's practice delves into all areas of family law, including Prenuptial Agreements, Divorce, Child Custody, Alimony, Child Support, Paternity, Relocation, and Appeals. From 1994 to 2008, she built her reputation in solo practice handling complex family law litigation and appeals, serving and consulting as an expert for other lawyers in the community, as well as handling cases involving indigent parents under investigation by the Department of Children & Families. In 2008, she accepted a position at a boutique firm where her success culminated in a partnership in 2010. With the sad death of her law partner in 2016, Ms. Inkeles opened InkelesLaw, P.A. where she continues to devote herself to the unique and complicated challenges of family law. As a thought-leader in her field, Ms. Inkeles is dedicated to understanding each client’s individual familial and financial circumstances and bridges the complexity of the legal system with the very real issues her clients face. She notes: "For the average person, the court system is a very unnatural and frightening place to be. That’s where my expertise becomes so useful and rewarding. I try to get people out of that system as efficiently as possible, while ensuring that they know they have a staunch advocate by their side. Trial should always be a last resort, but I am very comfortable in the courtroom and am not afraid to take the other side to the mat when necessary." Aside from being a skilled litigator and tireless advocate for her clients, Ms. Inkeles uses her decades of experience to improve the legal profession through mentoring young lawyers and serving on Bar Committees that have played an essential role in shaping Florida legislation. She has written for The Florida Bar Journal and has produced a body of work for other legal professional publications. The Expert Network© has written this news release with approval and/or contributions from Doreen Turner Inkeles. The Expert Network© is an invitation-only reputation management service that is dedicated to helping professionals stand out, network, and gain a competitive edge. The Expert Network© selects a limited number of professionals based on their individual recognitions and history of personal excellence.


Pulendran B.,Emory Vaccine Center | Pulendran B.,Emory University | Li S.,Emory Vaccine Center | Nakaya H.I.,Emory Vaccine Center
Immunity | Year: 2010

Vaccination is one of the greatest triumphs of modern medicine, yet we remain largely ignorant of the mechanisms by which successful vaccines stimulate protective immunity. Two recent advances are beginning to illuminate such mechanisms: realization of the pivotal role of the innate immune system in sensing microbes and stimulating adaptive immunity, and advances in systems biology. Recent studies have used systems biology approaches to obtain a global picture of the immune responses to vaccination in humans. This has enabled the identification of early innate signatures that predict the immunogenicity of vaccines, and identification of potentially novel mechanisms of immune regulation. Here, we review these advances and critically examine the potential opportunities and challenges posed by systems biology in vaccine development. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Galipeau J.,Emory University
Current Molecular Medicine | Year: 2013

Cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is the focus of intensive investigation. Several clinical trials, including large-scale placebo-controlled phase III clinical trials, are currently underway evaluating the therapeutic potential of autologous and allogeneic MSCs for treatment of catastrophic inflammatory diseases, including steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and Crohn's disease. MSCs are also being investigated as carriers of anti-cancer biotherapeutics. We here review recent developments in our understanding of the immunosuppressive properties of MSCs. We firstly discuss the effects of ex vivo culture conditions on the phenotype and functions of MSCs. Secondly, we summarize the immune functions suppressed by MSCs with a focus on T cell, B cell, natural killer cell and dendritic cell functions. Thirdly, we discuss newly identified pathways responsible for the immunosuppressive activity of MSCs, including the expression of heme-oxygenase (HO)-1, the secretion of galectins, CCL2 antagonism, T regulatory cell (Treg) cross-talk and production of TNF-a stimulated gene/protein-6 (TSG-6). Finally, we review the literature on the molecular pathways governing MSC homing and discuss recent clinical data on the use of MSCs for treatment of GvHD, MS and Crohn's disease. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.


Workowski K.A.,Emory University
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2010

These guidelines for the treatment of persons who have or are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were updated by CDC after consultation with a group of professionals knowledgeable in the field of STDs who met in Atlanta on April 18-30, 2009. The information in this report updates the 2006 Guidelines for Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (MMWR 2006;55[No. RR-11]). Included in these updated guidelines is new information regarding 1) the expanded diagnostic evaluation for cervicitis and trichomoniasis; 2) new treatment recommendations for bacterial vaginosis and genital warts; 3) the clinical efficacy of azithromycin for chlamydial infections in pregnancy; 4) the role of Mycoplasma genitalium and trichomoniasis in urethritis/cervicitis and treatment-related implications; 5) lymphogranuloma venereum proctocolitis among men who have sex with men; 6) the criteria for spinal fluid examination to evaluate for neurosyphilis; 7) the emergence of azithromycin-resistant Treponema pallidum; 8) the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae; 9) the sexual transmission of hepatitis C; 10) diagnostic evaluation after sexual assault; and 11) STD prevention approaches.


Chen J.,Emory University
Oncogene | Year: 2014

Post-translational modification (PTM) is an important step of signal transduction that transfers chemical groups such as phosphate, acetyl and glycosyl groups from one protein to another protein. As most of the PTMs are reversible, normal cells use PTMs as a 'switch' to determine the resting and proliferating state of cells that enables rapid and tight regulation of cell proliferation. In cancer cells, activation of oncogenes and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes provide continuous proliferative signals in part by adjusting the state of diverse PTMs of effector proteins that are involved in regulation of cell survival, cell cycle and proliferation, leading to abnormally fast proliferation of cancer cells. In addition to dysregulated proliferation, 'altered tumor metabolism' has recently been recognized as an emerging cancer hallmark. The most common metabolic phenotype of cancer is known as the Warburg effect or aerobic glycolysis that consists of increased glycolysis and enhanced lactate production even in the presence of oxygen. Although Otto Warburg observed aerobic glycolysis nearly 90 years ago, the detailed molecular mechanisms how increased glycolysis is regulated by oncogenic and/or tumor suppressive signaling pathways remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent advances revealing how these signaling pathways reprogram metabolism through diverse PTMs to provide a metabolic advantage to cancer cells, thereby promoting tumor cell proliferation, tumorigenesis and tumor growth. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2013-10-30

The disclosure relates to methods of growing bone or increasing bone mineral density and/or volume comprising administering an effective amount of a therapeutic containing abatacept or belatacept or other molecule that binds with CD8O, CD86, or CD28 providing inhibition of CD28 co-stimulation to a subject in need thereof.


Patent
CANCER RESEARCH TECHNOLOGY Ltd, IMPERIAL INNOVATIONS Ltd and Emory University | Date: 2015-02-20

The present invention pertains generally to the field of therapeutic compounds. More specifically the present invention pertains to certain pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-5,7-diamine compounds (referred to herein as PPDA compounds) that, inter alia, inhibit (e.g., selectively inhibit) CDK (e.g., CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK5, CDK6, CDK7, CDK8, CDK9, CDK10, CDK11, CDK12, CDK13, etc.). The present invention also pertains to pharmaceutical compositions comprising such compounds, and the use of such compounds and compositions, both in vitro and in vivo, to inhibit CDK; and to treat disorders including: disorders that are associated with CDK; disorders that result from an inappropriate activity of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK); disorders that are associated with CDK mutation; disorders that are associated with CDK overexpression; disorders that are associated with upstream pathway activation of CDK; disorders that are ameliorated by the inhibition of CDK; proliferative disorders; cancer; viral infections (including HIV); neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimers disease and Parkinsons disease); ischaemia; renal diseases; and cardiovascular disorders (including atherosclerosis). Optionally, the treatment further comprises treatment (e.g., simultaneous or sequential treatment) with a further active agent which is, e.g., an aromatase inhibitor, an anti-estrogen, a Her2 blocker, a cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent, etc.


Patent
Genway Biotech Inc., Emory University and MedStar Research Institute | Date: 2012-03-01

This invention relates to the area of cardiovascular disorders and specifically relates to methods of diagnostic tests using a combination of markers to predict an individuals risk for developing coronary artery disease (CAD) and related diseases, such as angina pectoris and peripheral vascular disease and, more particularly, to determine an individuals risk of myocardial infarction, death, and stroke. Exemplary biomarkers include C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrin degradation products (FDPs), Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70), and/or anti-CMV antibody.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2014-12-17

This disclosure relates to managing diabetes induced visual dysfunctions or vision loss by altering levels of dopamine. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of treating or preventing visual dysfunction or loss of vision comprising administering an effective amount of dopamine, derivative, ester, prodrug, or salt thereof to a subject wherein the subject is at risk of, exhibiting symptoms of or diagnosed with diabetes or diabetic retinopathy.


Patent
Emory University and U.S. Department Of Veterans Affairs | Date: 2011-07-11

The present invention relates to the use of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD^(+)) or of its reduced form, NADH, as sodium channel modulators. The present invention also relates to the use of compositions containing NAD^(+) or NADH to treat conditions associated with sodium channel current, such as arrhythmia. NAD^(+) is found to increase sodium channel current, while NADH is found to decrease sodium channel current. Thus, conditions that are associated with decreased sodium channel current can be treated with NAD^(+), while conditions that is associated with increased sodium channel current can be treated with NADH.


Patent
Imperial Innovations Ltd and Emory University | Date: 2013-03-19

This invention relates to quinazoline compounds of Formula (I) which are inhibitors of the histone lysine methyltransferase (HKMTase) EZH2, and to uses of such compounds as medicaments, in particular in the treatment of a disease or disorder in which inhibition of EZH2 provides a therapeutic or prophylactic effect.


Patent
Emory University, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Date: 2013-12-20

We have developed DNA and viral vectors that can be used, alone or in combination, as a vaccine against one HIV clade, subtype, or recombinant form of HIV or against multiple HIV clades, subtypes, or recombinant forms. Moreover, the vectors can encode a variety of antigens, which may be obtained from one clade or from two or more different clades, and the antigens selected and/or the manner in which the vectors are formulated (e.g., mixed) can be manipulated to generate a protective immune response against a variety of clades (e.g., the clades to which a patient is most likely to be exposed; with the proportions of the components of the vaccine tailored to the extent of the patients risk to a particular clade or clades).


Patent
University of Oregon, University of Washington and Emory University | Date: 2012-10-11

The present disclosure provides methods for inhibiting the anticoagulation effect of a thrombin inhibitor in a patient in need thereof comprising administration of a therapeutically effective amount of a variant prothrombin or thrombin that is capable of binding the thrombin inhibitor and that has reduced procoagulant activity. Variant prothrombins or thrombins of use in the methods of the present disclosure include thrombin mutants W215A, W215A/E217A, or variants thereof in which the amino acids at positions 215 and/or 217 are alanine. Methods are also provided in which the thrombin mutants are administered with an additional active agent. In one embodiment, the methods are useful in the treatment of patients in which a direct thrombin inhibitor has been administered. The present disclosure further provides a method for quantifying the concentration of an anticoagulant in the plasma or whole blood of a patient using a variant prothrombin or thrombin titration assay.


Patent
INC Research, Emory University, National Institute of Environmental Health, Safety, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System and University of Oregon | Date: 2012-10-19

The present invention relates to methods of treatment for Parkinson Disease (PD) in a person by identifying gene variants which may indicate a more favorable response to specific medicaments, thereby allowing for personalized or individualized treatment. The present invention relates to a method of screening for a genetic predisposition to PD in a person. The present invention is also directed to a method of testing a person for the presence of particular gene variants, wherein the presence of a gene variant indicates a higher predisposition to PD, and the absence of a gene variant indicates a lower predisposition to PD, compared to a control sample. The present invention further relates to methods and kits for treating, or inhibiting the development of, PD in a person. The present invention is also directed to a method of identifying the heritage of an individual based on the genetic profile of the individual.


This disclosure relates to compounds and compositions for cartilage repair and methods related thereto. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of inducing cartilage growth and regeneration comprising administering an effective amount of a composition comprising a compound disclosed herein to the subject or implanting a cartilage matrix comprising a compound disclosed herein in the subject. In certain embodiments, the compound is used locally such as injection at any desired site of cartilage formation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.1.4-4 | Award Amount: 40.88M | Year: 2011

Vaccines so far have been developed mostly by following an empiric approach. To prevent and possibly cure unresolved and emerging infectious diseases we need to fully exploit the potential of the human immune system. Progress in science and technology makes it possible to achieve what was previously deemed impossible. The scope of this project is to produce knowledge necessary to develop novel and powerful immunization technologies for the next generation of human vaccines. This goal requires a multidisciplinary approach in which diverse but complementary scientific disciplines and technologies converge. Therefore some of the most competitive European research groups from public institutions and biotechs have agreed to join forces in ADITEC, together with top US groups on systems biology and adjuvants to support this enterprise. A systems biology approach will be used to study licensed and experimental vaccines in patient characterization studies and in clinical trials, to investigate the effect of adjuvants, vectors, formulations, delivery devices, routes of immunization, homologous and heterologous primeboost schedules, as well as the impact of host factors such as age, gender, genetics and pathologies. Animal models will be used to complement human studies, and to select novel immunization technologies to be advanced to the clinic. To address these issues in a coordinated manner, ADITEC is organised on a matrix structure in which research themes and experimental approaches feed into each other. Training curricula will be created to impact on the formation of the next generation of EU researchers in the field. ADITEC scientists and institutions are part of the Sclavo Vaccines Association (SVA), which is dedicated to vaccines and vaccine research. SVA, acting as the coordinating institution, guarantees the long-term commitment and sustainability of this initiative, beyond the duration of ADITEC itself.


Patent
Emory University | Date: 2013-08-20

Compounds, pharmaceutical compositions including the compounds, and methods of preparation and use thereof are disclosed. The compounds are fulvene and/or fulvalene analogs. The compounds and compositions can be used to treat and/or prevent a wide variety of cancers, including drug resistant cancers, as well as numerous inflammatory, degenerative and vascular diseases, including various ocular diseases. Representative fulvene and/or fulvalene analogs include fulvene and fulvalene analogues of various dyes, hormones, sugars, peptides, oligonucleotides, amino acids, nucleotides, nucleosides, and polyols. The compounds are believed to function, at least, by inhibiting Nox or ROS. In some embodiments, the Nox is one that is selectively expressed in cancer cells over normal cells, or one that is expressed in higher amounts in cancer cells over normal cells. Thus, the compounds are novel therapeutic agents for a variety of cancers and other diseases.


Klatt N.R.,National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases | Silvestri G.,Emory University
Science Translational Medicine | Year: 2012

When it comes to HIV infection, CD4 + T cells are usually thought of as the cells that are preferentially infected and killed by the virus. In a new study, Soghoian et al. now show that during the early stages of HIV infection, CD4 + T cells suppress virus replication and delay disease onset. Thus, the robustness of the CD4 + T cell response during early HIV infection could be used as a marker to determine the speed of disease progression. The new findings also have implications for the design of preventive and therapeutic AIDS vaccines.


Budnitz D.S.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Lovegrove M.C.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Shehab N.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Richards C.L.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Richards C.L.,Emory University
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2011

Background: Adverse drug events are important preventable causes of hospitalization in older adults. However, nationally representative data on adverse drug events that result in hospitalization in this population have been limited. Methods: We used adverse-event data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-Cooperative Adverse Drug Event Surveillance project (2007 through 2009) to estimate the frequency and rates of hospitalization after emergency department visits for adverse drug events in older adults and to assess the contribution of specific medications, including those identified as high-risk or potentially inappropriate by national quality measures. Results: On the basis of 5077 cases identified in our sample, there were an estimated 99,628 emergency hospitalizations (95% confidence interval [CI], 55,531 to 143,724) for adverse drug events in U.S. adults 65 years of age or older each year from 2007 through 2009. Nearly half of these hospitalizations were among adults 80 years of age or older (48.1%; 95% CI, 44.6 to 51.6). Nearly two thirds of hospitalizations were due to unintentional overdoses (65.7%; 95% CI, 60.1 to 71.3). Four medications or medication classes were implicated alone or in combination in 67.0% (95% CI, 60.0 to 74.1) of hospitalizations: warfarin (33.3%), insulins (13.9%), oral antiplatelet agents (13.3%), and oral hypoglycemic agents (10.7%). High-risk medications were implicated in only 1.2% (95% CI, 0.7 to 1.7) of hospitalizations. Conclusions: Most emergency hospitalizations for recognized adverse drug events in older adults resulted from a few commonly used medications, and relatively few resulted from medications typically designated as high-risk or inappropriate. Improved management of antithrombotic and antidiabetic drugs has the potential to reduce hospitalizations for adverse drug events in older adults. Copyright © 2011 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Brrgeon D.,University Paris - Sud | Doetsch P.W.,Emory University
Nature Reviews Cancer | Year: 2011

The majority of human cells do not multiply continuously but are quiescent or slow-replicating and devote a large part of their energy to transcription. When DNA damage in the transcribed strand of an active gene is bypassed by a RNA polymerase, they can miscode at the damaged site and produce mutant transcripts. This process is known as transcriptional mutagenesis and, as discussed in this Perspective, could lead to the production of mutant proteins and might therefore be important in tumour development. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Tiniakos D.G.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Vos M.B.,Emory University | Brunt E.M.,University of Washington
Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease | Year: 2010

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is recognized as the leading cause of chronic liver disease in adults and children. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of liver injuries ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis with or without fibrosis. Fibrosis may progress to cirrhosis and complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. Histologic findings represent the complexity of pathophysiology. NAFLD is closely associated with obesity and is most closely linked with insulin resistance; the current Western diet, high in saturated fats and fructose, plays a significant role. There are several mechanisms by which excess triglycerides are acquired and accumulate in hepatocytes. Formation of steatotic droplets may be disordered in NAFLD. Visceral adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity and insulin resistance results in aberrant cytokine expression; many cytokines have a role in liver injury in NAFLD. Cellular stress and immune reactions, as well as the endocannabinoid system, have been implicated in animal models and in some human studies. Copyright © 2010 by Annual Reviews.


Guarner J.,Emory University | Brandt M.E.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Clinical Microbiology Reviews | Year: 2011

Fungal infections are becoming more frequent because of expansion of at-risk populations and the use of treatment modalities that permit longer survival of these patients. Because histopathologic examination of tissues detects fungal invasion of tissues and vessels as well as the host reaction to the fungus, it is and will remain an important tool to define the diagnostic significance of positive culture isolates or results from PCR testing. However, there are very few instances where the morphological characteristics of fungi are specific. Therefore, histopathologic diagnosis should be primarily descriptive of the fungus and should include the presence or absence of tissue invasion and the host reaction to the infection. The pathology report should also include a comment stating the most frequent fungi associated with that morphology as well as other possible fungi and parasites that should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alternate techniques have been used to determine the specific agent present in the histopathologic specimen, including immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and PCR. In addition, techniques such as laser microdissection will be useful to detect the now more frequently recognized dual fungal infections and the local environment in which this phenomenon occurs. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Patent
Emory University and Foundation University | Date: 2015-11-06

2-Fluoro-nucleoside compounds are disclosed which are useful in the treatment of hepatitis B infection, hepatitis C infection, HIV and abnormal cellular proliferation, including tumors and cancer. The compounds have the general formulae: wherein


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.1-2 | Award Amount: 17.67M | Year: 2013

As more people survive into old age, the prevalence of heart failure (HF), one of the most common and debilitating diseases in older people, will rise still further. Delaying or preventing HF will have great benefit to those at personal risk, their families, society and the economy. HOMAGE aims to provide a biomarker (BM) approach that will a) help identify i. patients at high risk of developing HF before the onset of symptoms and ii. subsets of patients who are more likely to respond to specifically targeted therapies (personalized medicine). In available cohorts, we will identify the most promising omics-based BM profiles for the pre-symptomatic diagnosis and future prediction of HF in patients at risk. The predictive value of the BMs for other co-morbidities commonly associated with HF and ageing will also be investigated. Furthermore, in a prospective trial, we will investigate the potential for targeting preventive therapy at patients with the greatest likelihood of response and the lowest risk of adverse effects. Our selection of innovative omics-based BMs is based on knowledge of biological pathways of the disease, which may facilitate identification of Biotargets for future therapies. On the economic side, HOMAGE will act as an economic catalyst for European SMEs in the field of cardiovascular and ageing BMs, estimated to peak annual turnovers of up to 800 M.


Patent
Emory University, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham, Women's Hospital and President And Fellows Of Harvard College | Date: 2016-08-30

The present invention provides methods and compositions for the treatment, prevention, or reduction of persistent infections, such as chronic infections, latent infections, and slow infections and cancer. The methods and compositions of the invention are also useful for the alleviation of one or more symptoms associated with such infections and cancer.


Patent
Emory University, Foundation University, Schinazi, Liotta, Chu, Mcatee, Shi, Choi, Lee and Hong | Date: 2011-12-07

2-Fluoronucleoside compounds are disclosed which are useful in the treatment of hepatitis B infection, hepatitis C infection, HIV and abnormal cellular proliferation, including tumors and cancer. The compounds have general formulae (I), (II), (III), (IV) wherein Base is a purine or pyrimidine base; R^(1) is OH, H, OR^(3), N_(3), CN, halogen, including F, or CF_(3), lower alkyl, amino, loweralkylamino, di(lower)alkylamino, or alkoxy, and base refers to a purine or pyrimidine base; R^(2) is H, phosphate, including monophosphate, diphosphate, triphosphate, or a stabilized phosphate prodrug; acyl, or other pharmaceutically acceptable leaving group which when administered in vivo, is capable of providing a compound wherein R^(2) is H or phosphate; sulfonate ester including alkyl or arylalkyl sulfonyl including methanesulfonyl, benzyl, wherein the phenyl group is optionally substituted with one or more substituents as described in the definition of aryl given above, a lipid, an amino acid, peptide, or cholesterol; and R^(3) is acyl, alkyl, phosphate, or other pharmaceutically acceptable leaving group which when administered in vivo, is capable of being cleaved to the parent compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.


Patent
Emory University, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases | Date: 2014-12-10

The invention provides modified virus Ankara (MVA), a replication-deficient strain of vaccinia virus, expressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) env, gag, and pol genes.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.26K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Ocular graft versus host disease O GVHD is a particularly severe and debilitating complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation HSCT O GVHD develops in of patients with chronic GVHD Currently Restasis cyclosporine A is the only FDA approved prescription topical medication to treat O GVHD In Restasis had sales of just under $ billion for the treatment dry eye however the therapeutic efficacy of Restasis is only and its use is associated with a rate of adverse events This lack of robust clinical effectiveness demonstrates that alternative therapies are needed Many HSCT patients who fail Restasis therapy have found relief from using autologous serum formulated into topical eye drops autologous serum tears AST Unfortunately the lack of standardization of AST preparations which are often prepared in doctorandapos s offices or pharmacies and challenges with its storage and administration have limited widespread adoption of this product In order to address the drawbacks of AST we have developed a proprietary method to manufacture a promising alternative a standardized platelet lysate preparation using pooled platelet collections phPL from qualified blood donors Elate OcularTM Ocular phPL We believe Elate OcularTM will be superior to Restasis or AST for treatment of patients with O GVHD and other forms of dry eye since Elate OcularTM is enriched compared to serum for a number of growth factors that promote corneal healing has robust anti inflammatory actions that can reduce ocular inflammation in patients with GVHD and possesses bacteriostatic properties This STTR Phase I application is submitted by Cambium Medical Technologies LLC a start up company founded by faculty members from Emory University School of Medicine who developed Ocular phPL Emory will be the sub contracting research organization for this application Emory University has filed a patent application to protect our proprietary manufacturing process for phPL and Cambium has exclusive rights to this patent and technology The investigators have previously received two INDs from FDA CBER for other applications of phPL IND NCT and IND NCT and we are now seeking to submit a treatment IND for Elate OcularTM and conduct a Phase I II clinical study in HSCT patients with O GVHD In order to support these clinical studies we propose in this application to first further improve and validate the safety and efficacy profiles f Elate OcularTM by i demonstrating feasibility of applying a pathogen inactivation PI process during production of Elate OcularTM ii performing in vitro work on Elate OcularTM PI treatment to compare product compositions and mechanisms of action and iii performing animal toxicology efficacy studies with Elate OcularTM PI treatment in animals with a pre existing inflammatory condition or deficient tear production Successful completion of these aims will allow us to complete our FDA IND application and initiate the Phase I II study for which we will seek Phase II STTR support in order to demonstrate that Elate OcularTM is safe and well tolerated in patients suffering O GVHD morbidity a required step toward future commercialization PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Many patients with blood cancers are increasingly being treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation HSCT This type of HSCT is often curative but is not without side effects including debilitating eye problems We propose to perform the FDA required studies necessary to commercialize a new eye drop designed to treat the ocular side effects of allogeneic HSCT


Patent
Emory University, President And Fellows Of Harvard College, Brigham, Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Date: 2013-12-30

The present invention provides methods and compositions for the treatment, prevention, or reduction of persistent infections, such as chronic infections, latent infections, and slow infections and cancer. The methods and compositions of the invention are also useful for the alleviation of one or more symptoms associated with such infections and cancer.


Patent
Emory University and University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Date: 2015-04-29

This disclosure relates to endothelial or endothelial like cells cultured from fibroblasts exposed to transcription factor ETV2. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to methods of producing endothelial or endothelial like cells comprising exposing fibroblasts with ETV2 under conditions such that the fibroblasts are modified to form a pool of cells expressing increased levels of endothelium surface markers compared to the fibroblasts. In certain embodiments, the disclosure relates to using endothelial like cells reported herein for the treatment of vascular, cardiac, and wound healing indications.


Methods, systems and computer-readable storage media relate to determining individualized treatment planning margins. The methods may include processing motion data of a target obtained from at least one marker for one or more periods. Each period may include a plurality of time intervals. The processing may include processing the motion data to determine an isocenter for each time interval along at least one of the axes of motion. The axes can include the x axis, the y axis, and/or the z axis. The method may include determining motion prediction data for each of the at least one of the axes; and determining treatment planning margins for each of the at least one of the axes based on the motion prediction data. The individualized treatment margins can be smaller and more optimal because the treatment margins can incorporate patient specific patterns of motion of a target (e.g., an organ).


Patent
Emory University, Foundation University, Schinazi, Liotta, Chu, Mcatee, Shi, Choi, Lee and Hong | Date: 2011-11-30

2-Fluoronucleoside compounds are disclosed which are useful in the treatment of hepatitis B infection, hepatitis C infection, HIV and abnormal cellular proliferation, including tumors and cancer. The compounds have general formulae (I), (II), (III), (IV) wherein Base is a purine or pyrimidine base; R^(1) is OH, H, OR^(3), N_(3), CN, halogen, including F, or CF_(3), lower alkyl, amino, loweralkylamino, di(lower)alkylamino, or alkoxy, and base refers to a purine or pyrimidine base; R^(2) is H, phosphate, including monophosphate, diphosphate, triphosphate, or a stabilized phosphate prodrug; acyl, or other pharmaceutically acceptable leaving group which when administered in vivo, is capable of providing a compound wherein R^(2) is H or phosphate; sulfonate ester including alkyl or arylalkyl sulfonyl including methanesulfonyl, benzyl, wherein the phenyl group is optionally substituted with one or more substituents as described in the definition of aryl given above, a lipid, an amino acid, peptide, or cholesterol; and R^(3) is acyl, alkyl, phosphate, or other pharmaceutically acceptable leaving group which when administered in vivo, is capable of being cleaved to the parent compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.


Patent
Emory University, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and President And Fellows Of Harvard College | Date: 2016-09-07

PD-1 antagonists are disclosed that can be used to reduce the expression or activity of PD-1 in a subject. An immune response specific to an infectious agent or to tumor cells can be enhanced using these PD-1 antagonists in conjunction with an antigen from the infectious agent or tumor. Thus, subjects with infections, such as persistent infections can be treated using PD-1 antagonists. In additions, subjects with tumors can be treated using the PD-1 antagonists. In several examples, subjects can be treated by transplanting a therapeutically effective amount of activated T cells that recognize an antigen of interest and by administering a therapeutically effective amount of a PD-1 antagonist.


Olfson M.,Columbia University | Druss B.G.,Emory University | Marcus S.C.,University of Pennsylvania
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: Increasing mental health treatment of young people and broadening conceptualizations of psychopathology have triggered concerns about a disproportionate increase in the treatment of youths with low levels of mental health impairment. METHODS: We analyzed the 1996-1998, 2003-2005, and 2010-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, which were nationally representative surveys of U.S. households, for trends in outpatient use of mental health services by persons 6 to 17 years of age; 53,622 persons were included in the analysis. Mental health impairment was measured with the use of the Columbia Impairment Scale (range, 0 to 52, with higher scores indicating more severe impairment); we classified youths with scores of 16 or higher as having more severe impairment and those with scores of less than 16 as having less severe impairment. RESULTS: The percentage of youths receiving any outpatient mental health service increased from 9.2% in 1996-1998 to 13.3% in 2010-2012 (odds ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.35 to 1.72). The proportionate increase in the use of mental health services among youths with more severe impairment (from 26.2% to 43.9%) was larger than that among youths with less severe or no impairment (from 6.7% to 9.6%). However, the absolute increase in annual service use was larger among youths with less severe or no impairment (from 2.74 million to 4.19 million) than among those with more severe impairment (from 1.56 million to 2.28 million). Significant overall increases occurred in the use of psychotherapy (from 4.2% to 6.0%) and psychotropic medications (from 5.5% to 8.9%), including stimulants and related medications (from 4.0% to 6.6%), antidepressants (from 1.5% to 2.6%), and antipsychotic drugs (from 0.2% to 1.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Outpatient mental health treatment and psychotropic-medication use in children and adolescents increased in the United States between 1996-1998 and 2010-2012. Although youths with less severe or no impairment accounted for most of the absolute increase in service use, youths with more severe impairment had the greatest relative increase in use, yet fewer than half accessed services in 2010-2012. Copyright © 2015 Massachusetts Medical Society.

Loading Emory University collaborators
Loading Emory University collaborators