North Vancouver, Canada

Emily Carr University of Art and Design

www.ecuad.ca/
North Vancouver, Canada

Emily Carr University of Art and Design is a public post-secondary University located on Granville Island in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Established in 1925 as the Vancouver School of Decorative and Applied Arts, it is named after Canadian artist Emily Carr.Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design's arms, supporters, flag, and badge were registered with the Canadian Heraldic Authority on April 20, 2007. On April 28, 2008, the Provincial Government announced its intention to amend the University Act at the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia to recognize Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design as a full university, named Emily Carr University of Art and Design. The university began its operation under the new name on September 1, 2008. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 20, 2016
Site: phys.org

In an innovative design project, six new stylish benches have been installed outside the UBC Bookstore. Assembled from light-coloured honeycomb-shaped bricks under a top of clear acrylic, the seats are more than an eye-catching spot where students can relax—they're also very much alive, grown from a blend of oyster mushroom spores and alder sawdust packed into moulds. The roots of the project stretch back to 2014, when assistant professor at UBC School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture Joe Dahmen and his partner in work and life, Amber Frid-Jimenez, Canada Research Chair in Design and Technology at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, were expecting their second child. They had been working on an architectural installation fabricated of recycled polystyrene blocks—not exactly the most benign material —when they decided to explore more eco-friendly options. "Amber couldn't get near the thing because it was so toxic," Dahmen recalled, touring the greenhouse where the benches were grown. "It got me thinking that there must be a more natural material that would still enable a similar range of expression." In their search for an alternative, Dahmen and Frid-Jimenez discovered the world of mycelium biocomposites, an emerging field in which mushroom roots, or mycelium, grow in loose cellulosic material such as sawdust. The results are durable materials with attributes similar to that of polystyrene foams. Although a U.S. company recently signed a contract to provide Ikea with mycelium-based packaging, the method had yet to be done in Canada. Through UBC's social ecological economic development studies (SEEDS) sustainability program, Dahmen and Frid-Jimenez worked with university students and staff to develop a scalable method of producing mycelium biocomposites using two local materials: oyster mushroom spores and alder sawdust. To address the size limitation of the material—mycelium biocomposites risk contamination by mould and bacteria if they exceed a half-metre in thickness—Dahmen developed a new process that drew inspiration from a wasps' nest discovered in the empty greenhouse that would house the project. "I was really amazed at the honeycomb structure, because it's a highly efficient way of occupying space," he said, holding a piece of wasps' nest to display its dense grid of hexagonal chambers. "It's scalable, it can go in any direction, and it's extremely spatially efficient." Putting a hole in the centre of each block of mycelium biocomposite not only allowed Dahmen to grow larger objects, it also provides a place in the benches for the mushroom to fruit. "That way, it's contained, so people can see it but they won't worry about getting it on their clothes when they sit down," he notes. The fact that oyster mushroom fruit are "delicious", said Dahmen, was a consolation whenever the growing process went awry. Perhaps the greatest potential of mycelium biocomposites is as an alternative insulation material for buildings. "Their biggest application in the long run is in architecture and construction," said Dahmen. "The average age of commercial buildings in North America is under 40 years. If we could imagine construction materials that add positive value to ecosystems as they break down, we have a whole new paradigm for the way we approach buildings, at a time when we're demolishing most buildings long before they wear out." Dahmen also foresees mycelium biocomposites as a replacement for many other roles played by polystyrene, from packaging to building insulation. "Styrofoam is a material that functions for a short amount of time as packaging, and then spends hundreds, if not thousands, of years in a landfill," he observed. Not only does mycelium biocomposite require much less energy to create, it also completely decomposes when composted, and helps break down other materials in the waste stream, making them available to other organisms. Explore further: Mushroom lights up the night in Brazil: Researcher finds bioluminescent fungus not seen since 1840


Raber C.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
International Journal of Design Management and Professional Practice | Year: 2015

In this case study Blue Cottage Consulting shares their human centered design approach for the development of a functional program and operational vision for the future Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Alberta Children's Hospital. This approach included engaging families and front-line staff in photo journals and storyboarding activities in order to gain a deeper understanding of their needs and desires for the future space. We found that human centered design has great applicability in the field of healthcare and can be used to expand the family and patient centered care movement. Human centered design tools can successfully empower front-line staff, patients and families to engage in the visioning of their future health experiences. © Common Ground, Caylee Raber, All Rights Reserved.


Doonan N.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
International Journal of Social Sustainability in Economic, Social and Cultural Context | Year: 2013

This paper focuses on the production of publics by performance art that is located outside of institutional (gallery/museum) settings. The two case studies presented provoke considerations of the roles of participatory performance art in relation to social and cultural sustainability. Introducing Miriam Simun's The Lady Cheese Shop and Atom Cianfarani's CONSUME LOVE, I argue for their contribution toward a democratic public sphere through affective engagement of participants. These are the first two projects I have curated through the new creative platform le/the SensoriuM (www.lesensorium.com). Located in Montréal, le/the SensoriuM presents an ongoing series of performance art events, with the goal of generating discussion through and about food. This article is the first piece of critical writing to address either The Lady Cheese Shop or CONSUME LOVE, although each was performed in New York before its iteration through le/the SensoriuM. © Common Ground, Natalie Doonan, All Rights Reserved.


The Natural Capital Project is an interactive community mapping and storytelling project designed to promote the non-market value of nature's essential ecosystem services in the Lower Mainland region of British Columbia, Canada, and shed new light on the importance of fragile coastal ecosystems in people's lives. The project was developed through a two-semester cross-disciplinary studio-based community projects course in the Faculty of Culture + Community at one of Canada's leading postsecondary art institutions, the Emily Carr University of Art + Design (Vancouver), in partnership with one of Canada's leading environmental organizations, the David Suzuki Foundation (DSF). Through a dynamic and collaborative approach to documentary practices, postsecondary art students across a variety of levels and disciplines created a series of digital narratives for an app in development by DSF designed to bring to life their report on aquatic ecosystems in British Columbia's Lower Mainland. The study estimates that the region's wetlands, beaches, and coastal areas provide at least 30 to 60 billion in economic benefits to residents every year. The course culminated in a museum exhibit at the Gulf of Georgia Cannery (GoGC) in Steveston, British Columbia, offering students the opportunity to see the effects of their work in a public space and feel like their input could have an impact on the environment and in changing hearts and minds.


da Silva R.R.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
Leonardo | Year: 2011

Geraldo de Barros produced a series called Fotoformas, consisting of photographic experiments that pioneered abstractionism in Brazil. Since the mid-1990s, this series has been presented in various retrospective exhibitions and publications. The predominant critical interpretation of the work has linked it with Concrete Art, downplaying Barros's participation in the Bandeirante Photography and Cinema Club (FCCB), an amateur association. This article rethinks his engagement in both circuits, demonstrating that the artist created the Fotoformas in dialogue with this photo-club. The author also analyzes Barros's experimental approach, which was based on the inscription of indexical marks on the images to deny the constraints of the camera, with the emphasis instead on process and interdisciplinary artistic practice. Thus, he created an alternative to Brazilian abstractionism, which focused mostly on formal aspects. © 2011 ISAST.


Gadassik A.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
Leonardo | Year: 2016

James Turrell’s perceptual cells incorporate the neurophysiological apparatus as an active participant not only in the reception of projected moving-images, but also in the very production and transmission of virtual moving-images. Combining two perceptual phenomena-the stroboscopic effect and the Ganzfeld Effect-Turrell’s perceptual cells integrate the architecture of projection with the architecture of organic vision to produce a single networked extra-sensory medium. This paper performs a phenomenological analysis of Turrell’s Light Reignfall (2011) perceptual cell, following its design, effects on the viewer, and cultural and material history. In the process, the paper situates the perceptual cell between the history of avant-garde cinema (what historians have called “paracinema”) and the history of perceptual psychology and parapsychology (what the author terms “para-cinema”). Between these two paracinemas, Turrell’s perceptual cells activate the aesthetic potential of what the author discusses as “edgeless projection.”. © 2016 Alla Gadassik.


Martin C.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
International Journal of Designed Objects | Year: 2014

Cookbooks offer a wide range of possibilities and specific challenges when designed as interactive ebooks. This paper explores the design process and workflow in the making of "Eat St. Cookbook" for tablet devices, an interactive cookbook based on a series of curated recipes from the television series "Eat St." This project involved an assessment of current publishing platforms for the e-cookbook niche and included the development of personas, an online survey of the target audience, several stages of prototyping, and user testing. The project was funded by a Canadian national grant and developed by researchers at the Social and Interactive Media Centre, Emily Carr University of Art + Design. As a result of this project, we are able to conceptualize a series of design guidelines for interactive cookbooks. © Common Ground, Celeste Martin, All Rights Reserved Permissions.


Koenig I.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
Leonardo | Year: 2015

When art students at Emily Carr University take a hybrid humanities/studio class with a scientific theme, they are challenged to materially transform abstract concepts. Students interact with physicists and make work on site at TRIUMF, Canada’s National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics. Strategies for art and science partnership models are tested in a curricular Transformation Art Lab as well as the RAW DATA project, where students view studio faculty struggling with similar challenges.] © 2015 ISAST.


Gadassik A.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
ACM SIGGRAPH 2016 Art Gallery, SIGGRAPH 2016 | Year: 2016

James Turrell's perceptual cells incorporate the neurophysiological apparatus as an active participant not only in the reception of projected moving-images, but also in the very production and transmission of virtual moving-images. Combining two perceptual phenomena-the stroboscopic effect and the Ganzfeld Effect-Turrell's perceptual cells integrate the architecture of projection with the architecture of organic vision to produce a single networked extra-sensory medium. This paper performs a phenomenological analysis of Turrell's Light Reignfall (2011) perceptual cell, following its design, effects on the viewer, and cultural and material history. In the process, the paper situates the perceptual cell between the history of avant-garde cinema (what historians have called "paracinema") and the history of perceptual psychology and parapsychology (what the author terms "para-cinema"). Between these two paracinemas, Turrell's perceptual cells activate the aesthetic potential of what the author discusses as "edgeless projection". © 2016 Alla Gadassik.


Peterson M.,Emily Carr University of Art and Design
International Journal of Design in Society | Year: 2015

This paper explores the motivations and challenges of participation in local food systems. Whereas industrial food systems remove the ability for consumers and producers to know each other and communicate, local food systems offer the opportunity for connection, especially when food is exchanged between producers and consumers directly. While the time required by direct sales often becomes a barrier, sales through an intermediary can increase the accessibility and convenience of local foods. Two precedents for intermediary sales are reviewed: the Saskatoon Farmers' Market's Little Market Store, a producer-managed store that extended the availability of farmers' market products beyond market days, and Discovery Organics, a British Columbia-based produce wholesaler. Building from these precedents, this paper suggests possibilities for the design of a service to support local food consumers and producers in connecting and communicating, both directly and through stores. © Common Ground, Michael Peterson, All Rights Reserved.

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