Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France
Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

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Albrich W.C.,University of Witwatersrand | Madhi S.A.,University of Witwatersrand | Adrian P.V.,University of Witwatersrand | Van Niekerk N.,University of Witwatersrand | And 10 more authors.
BMJ Open | Year: 2014

Objective: A high genomic load of Pneumococcus from blood or cerebrospinal fluid has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to analyse whether nasopharyngeal colonisation density in HIV-infected patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with markers of disease severity or poor outcome. Methods: Quantitative lytA real-time PCR was performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in HIV-infected South African adults hospitalised for acute CAP at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa. Pneumonia aetiology was considered pneumococcal if any sputum culture or Gram stain, urinary pneumococcal C-polysaccharide-based antigen, blood culture or whole blood lytA real-time PCR revealed pneumococci. Results: There was a moderate correlation between the mean nasopharyngeal colonisation densities and increasing CURB65 scores among all-cause patients with pneumonia (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.15, p=0.06) or with the Pitt bacteraemia score among patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia (p=0.63). In patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonisation density was higher among non-survivors than survivors (7.7 vs 6.1 log10 copies/mL, respectively, p=0.02) and among those who had pneumococci identified from blood cultures and/or by whole blood lytA real-time PCR than those with non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (6.6 vs 5.6 log10 copies/mL, p=0.03). Nasopharyngeal colonisation density correlated positively with the biomarkers procalcitonin (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.37, p<0.0001), proadrenomedullin (r=0.39, p=0.008) and copeptin (r=0.30, p=0.01). Conclusions: In addition to its previously reported role as a diagnostic tool for pneumococcal pneumonia, quantitative nasopharyngeal colonisation density also correlates with mortality and prognostic biomarkers. It may also be useful as a severity marker for pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected adults.


Rodrigues R.,Emerging Pathogens Laboratory | Paranhos-Baccala G.,Emerging Pathogens Laboratory | Vernet G.,Emerging Pathogens Laboratory | Peyrefitte C.N.,Emerging Pathogens Laboratory | Peyrefitte C.N.,Institute Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a widely distributed tick-borne member of the Nairovirus genus (Bunyaviridae) with a high mortality rate in humans. CCHFV induces a severe disease in infected patients that includes, among other symptoms, massive liver necrosis and failure. The interaction between liver cells and CCHFV is therefore important for understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. Here, we described the in vitro CCHFV-infection and -replication in the hepatocyte cell line, Huh7, and the induced cellular and molecular response modulation. We found that CCHFV was able to infect and replicate to high titres and to induce a cytopathic effect (CPE). We also observed by flow cytometry and real time quantitative RT-PCR evidence of apoptosis, with the participation of the mitochondrial pathway. On the other hand, we showed that the replication of CCHFV in hepatocytes was able to interfere with the death receptor pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, we found in CCHFV-infected cells the over-expression of PUMA, Noxa and CHOP suggesting the crosstalk between the ER-stress and mitochondrial apoptosis. By ELISA, we observed an increase of IL-8 in response to viral replication; however apoptosis was shown to be independent from IL-8 secretion. When we compared the induced cellular response between CCHFV and DUGV, a mild or non-pathogenic Nairovirus for humans, we found that the most striking difference was the absence of CPE and apoptosis. Despite the XBP1 splicing and PERK gene expression induced by DUGV, no ER-stress and apoptosis crosstalk was observed. Overall, these results suggest that CCHFV is able to induce ER-stress, activate inflammatory mediators and modulate both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways of apoptosis in hepatocyte cells, which may, in part, explain the role of the liver in the pathogenesis of CCHFV. © 2012 Rodrigues et al.


PubMed | Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, University of Witwatersrand, Emerging Pathogens Laboratory and Thermo Scientific Biomarkers
Type: Journal Article | Journal: BMJ open | Year: 2014

A high genomic load of Pneumococcus from blood or cerebrospinal fluid has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to analyse whether nasopharyngeal colonisation density in HIV-infected patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with markers of disease severity or poor outcome.Quantitative lytA real-time PCR was performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in HIV-infected South African adults hospitalised for acute CAP at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa. Pneumonia aetiology was considered pneumococcal if any sputum culture or Gram stain, urinary pneumococcal C-polysaccharide-based antigen, blood culture or whole blood lytA real-time PCR revealed pneumococci.There was a moderate correlation between the mean nasopharyngeal colonisation densities and increasing CURB65 scores among all-cause patients with pneumonia (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.15, p=0.06) or with the Pitt bacteraemia score among patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia (p=0.63). In patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonisation density was higher among non-survivors than survivors (7.7 vs 6.1 log10 copies/mL, respectively, p=0.02) and among those who had pneumococci identified from blood cultures and/or by whole blood lytA real-time PCR than those with non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (6.6 vs 5.6 log10 copies/mL, p=0.03). Nasopharyngeal colonisation density correlated positively with the biomarkers procalcitonin (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.37, p<0.0001), proadrenomedullin (r=0.39, p=0.008) and copeptin (r=0.30, p=0.01).In addition to its previously reported role as a diagnostic tool for pneumococcal pneumonia, quantitative nasopharyngeal colonisation density also correlates with mortality and prognostic biomarkers. It may also be useful as a severity marker for pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected adults.


PubMed | University of Witwatersrand, University of St. Gallen, Emerging Pathogens Laboratory and Emory University
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Journal of clinical microbiology | Year: 2014

Quantitative lytA real-time PCR (rtPCR) results from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs distinguish community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAP) from asymptomatic colonization. The use of an optimized cutoff value improved pneumococcal etiology determination compared to that of traditional diagnostic methods. Here, we compare the utility of lytA rtPCR from induced sputum and from NP swabs. Pneumococcus was considered the cause of CAP in HIV-infected South African adults if blood culture, induced-sputum culture or Gram stain, urine antigen test, or whole-blood lytA rtPCR revealed pneumococcus or if lytA rtPCR from NP swabs gave a result of >8,000 copies/ml. lytA rtPCR was also performed on induced sputum. Pneumococcus was detected by lytA rtPCR from sputum in 149 (67.1%) of 222 patients with available induced sputum, whereas the results of either Gram stain or culture of sputum were positive in 105 of 229 patients (45.9%; P < 0.001). The mean copy numbers from sputum were higher when the sputum cultures were positive than when the sputum cultures were negative (7.9 versus 5.6 log10 copies/ml; P < 0.001). Against the composite diagnostic standard, a cutoff value of 10,000 copies/ml for good-quality sputum lytA rtPCR had a sensitivity of 78.1% and a specificity of 80.0%. This cutoff value performed similarly to the previously identified cutoff value of 8,000 copies/ml for NP swab lytA rtPCR (area under the curve receiver operating characteristic [AUC-ROC], 80.4% for sputum of any quality versus 79.6% for NP swabs). The AUC-ROC for good-quality sputum was 83.2%. Overall, lytA rtPCR performs similarly well on induced sputum as on NP swabs for most patients but performs slightly better if good-quality sputum can be obtained. Due to the ease of specimen collection, NP swabs may be preferable for the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia.


Albrich W.C.,University of Witwatersrand | Albrich W.C.,Hospital Epidemiology | Madhi S.A.,University of Witwatersrand | Adrian P.V.,University of Witwatersrand | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Microbiology | Year: 2014

Quantitative lytA real-time PCR (rtPCR) results from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs distinguish community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAP) from asymptomatic colonization. The use of an optimized cutoff value improved pneumococcal etiology determination compared to that of traditional diagnostic methods. Here, we compare the utility of lytA rtPCR from induced sputum and from NP swabs. Pneumococcus was considered the cause of CAP in HIV-infected South African adults if blood culture, induced-sputum culture or Gram stain, urine antigen test, or whole-blood lytA rtPCR revealed pneumococcus or if lytA rtPCR from NP swabs gave a result of >8,000 copies/ml. lytA rtPCR was also performed on induced sputum. Pneumococcus was detected by lytA rtPCR from sputum in 149 (67.1%) of 222 patients with available induced sputum, whereas the results of either Gram stain or culture of sputum were positive in 105 of 229 patients (45.9%; P<0.001). The mean copy numbers from sputum were higher when the sputum cultures were positive than when the sputum cultures were negative (7.9 versus 5.6 log10 copies/ ml; P<0.001). Against the composite diagnostic standard, a cutoff value of 10,000 copies/ml for good-quality sputum lytA rtPCR had a sensitivity of 78.1% and a specificity of 80.0%. This cutoff value performed similarly to the previously identified cutoff value of 8,000 copies/ml for NP swab lytA rtPCR (area under the curve receiver operating characteristic [AUC-ROC], 80.4% for sputum of any quality versus 79.6% for NP swabs). The AUC-ROC for good-quality sputum was 83.2%. Overall, lytA rtPCR performs similarly well on induced sputum as on NP swabs for most patients but performs slightly better if good-quality sputum can be obtained. Due to the ease of specimen collection, NP swabs may be preferable for the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Galmes J.,Emerging Pathogens Laboratory | Li Y.,Institute of Pathogen Biology CAMS Fondation Merieux | Rajoharison A.,Emerging Pathogens Laboratory | Ren L.,Institute of Pathogen Biology CAMS Fondation Merieux | And 7 more authors.
European Respiratory Journal | Year: 2013

An unexplained increase in the incidence of parapneumonic empyema (PPE) in pneumonia cases has been reported in recent years. The present study investigated the genetic and biological specifications of new isolates of torque teno mini virus (TTMV) detected in pleural effusion samples from children hospitalised for severe pneumonia with PPE. A pathogen discovery protocol was applied in undiagnosed pleural effusion samples and led to the identification of three new isolates of TTMV (TTMV-LY). Isolated TTMV-LY genomes were transfected into A549 and human embryonic kidney 293T cells and viral replication was assessed by quantitative realtime PCR and full-length genome amplification. A549 cells were further infected with released TTMV-LY virions and the induced-innate immune response was measured by multiplex immunoassays. Genetic analyses of the three TTMV-LY genomes revealed a classic genomic organisation but a weak identity (,64%) with known sequences. We demonstrated the in vitro replication of TTMV-LY in alveolar epithelial cells and the effective release of infectious viral particles. We also showed a selective production of inflammatory mediators in response to TTMV infection. This study reports the description of replicative TTMV-LY isolated from parapneumonic effusions of children hospitalised with PPE, suggesting a potential role of the virus in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Copyright © ERS 2013.


PubMed | Pfizer, Emerging Pathogens Laboratory, Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit Medical Research Council and Jolla Inc
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical microbiology | Year: 2016

A serotype-specific urinary antigen detection (UAD) assay for 13 serotypes included in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was recently reported as a useful diagnostic tool for pneumococcal pneumonia. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the UAD in HIV-infected South African adults. Urine specimens from a well-defined cohort of HIV-infected South African adults with pneumonia were evaluated retrospectively in the UAD assay. Pneumonia was considered pneumococcal if either sputum Gram stain, sputum culture, blood culture, or the immunochromatographic (ICT) BinaxNow S. pneumoniae test (composite diagnostic) was positive. Among 235 enrolled pneumonia patients, the UAD assay was more frequently positive (104 [44.3%]) than the composite diagnostic (71 [30.2%]; P < 0.001) and increased the pneumococcal etiology from 30.2% by an additional 22.6% to 52.8%. The UAD assay detected more pneumococcal etiologies (45.0%) than the serotype-independent ICT (23.4%, P < 0.001). UAD identified 6/7 patients with PCV13 serotype bacteremia without misclassification of bacteremia episodes due to non-PCV13 serotypes. UAD was positive for 5.1% of asymptomatic HIV-infected persons, with higher rates among those with nasopharyngeal carriage. Concordance between serotypes identified by UAD and by Quellung reaction and PCR serotyping was 70/86 (81.4%). UAD identified the dominant serotype in multiple serotype carriage. This study confirms the utility of the UAD assay for HIV-infected adults comparing favorably with other diagnostic tests. A highly valent UAD may become a new standard for detection of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults. Prior to PCV introduction, at least 53% of pneumonia cases were due to pneumococci in HIV-infected South African adults.


Fraisier C.,Institute Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Armed Forces Biomedical Research Institute | Fraisier C.,Aix - Marseille University | Rodrigues R.,Emerging Pathogens Laboratory | Vu Hai V.,Institute Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Armed Forces Biomedical Research Institute | And 10 more authors.
Virus Research | Year: 2014

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus responsible for hemorrhagic manifestations and multiple organ failure, with a high mortality rate. In infected humans, damage to endothelial cells and vascular leakage may be a direct result of virus infection or an immune response-mediated indirect effect. The main target cells are mononuclear phagocytes, endothelial cells and hepatocytes; the liver being a key target for the virus, which was described as susceptible to interferon host response and to induce apoptosis. To better understand the early liver cell alterations due to virus infection, the protein profile of in vitro CCHFV-infected HepG2 cells was analyzed using two quantitative proteomic approaches, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. A set of 243 differentially expressed proteins was identified. Bioinformatics analysis (Ingenuity Pathways Analysis) revealed multiple host cell pathways and functions altered after CCHFV infection, with notably 106 proteins related to cell death, including 79 associated with apoptosis. Different protein networks emerged with associated pathways involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis, ubiquitination/sumoylation, regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, and virus entry. Collectively, this study revealed host liver protein abundances that were modified at the early stages of CCHFV infection, offering an unparalleled opportunity of the description of the potential pathogenesis processes and of possible targets for antiviral research. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Aix - Marseille University, Institute Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Armed Forces Biomedical Research Institute and Emerging Pathogens Laboratory
Type: | Journal: Virus research | Year: 2014

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus responsible for hemorrhagic manifestations and multiple organ failure, with a high mortality rate. In infected humans, damage to endothelial cells and vascular leakage may be a direct result of virus infection or an immune response-mediated indirect effect. The main target cells are mononuclear phagocytes, endothelial cells and hepatocytes; the liver being a key target for the virus, which was described as susceptible to interferon host response and to induce apoptosis. To better understand the early liver cell alterations due to virus infection, the protein profile of in vitro CCHFV-infected HepG2 cells was analyzed using two quantitative proteomic approaches, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. A set of 243 differentially expressed proteins was identified. Bioinformatics analysis (Ingenuity Pathways Analysis) revealed multiple host cell pathways and functions altered after CCHFV infection, with notably 106 proteins related to cell death, including 79 associated with apoptosis. Different protein networks emerged with associated pathways involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis, ubiquitination/sumoylation, regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, and virus entry. Collectively, this study revealed host liver protein abundances that were modified at the early stages of CCHFV infection, offering an unparalleled opportunity of the description of the potential pathogenesis processes and of possible targets for antiviral research.


Hoffmann J.,Center dInfectiologie Charles Merieux | Rabezanahary H.,Center dInfectiologie Charles Merieux | Randriamarotia M.,Fondation Medicale dAmpasimanjeva FMA | Ratsimbasoa A.,Fondation Merieux | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Background: In Madagascar, very little is known about the etiology and prevalence of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in a rural tropical area. Recent data are needed to determine the viral and atypical bacterial etiologies in children with defined clinical manifestations of ARIs. Methods: During one year, we conducted a prospective study on ARIs in children between 2 to 59 months in the community hospital of Ampasimanjeva, located in the south-east of Madagascar. Respiratory samples were analyzed by multiplex real-time RT-PCR, including 18 viruses and 2 atypical bacteria. The various episodes of ARI were grouped into four clinical manifestations with well-documented diagnosis: "Community Acquired Pneumonia"(CAP, group I), "Other acute lower respiratory infections (Other ALRIs, group II)", "Upper respiratory tract infections with cough (URTIs with cough, group III)"and "Upper respiratory tract infections without cough (URTIs without cough, group IV)". Results: 295 children were included in the study between February 2010 and February 2011. Viruses and/or atypical bacteria respiratory pathogens were detected in 74.6% of samples, the rate of co-infection was 27.3%. Human rhinovirus (HRV; 20.5%), metapneumovirus (HMPV A/B, 13.8%), coronaviruses (HCoV, 12.5%), parainfluenza virus (HPIV, 11.8%) and respiratory syncytial virus A and B (RSV A/B, 11.8%) were the most detected. HRV was predominantly single detected (23.8%) in all the clinical groups while HMPV A/B (23.9%) was mainly related to CAP (group I), HPIV (17.3%) to the "Other ALRIs" (group II), RSV A/B (19.5%) predominated in the group "URTIs with cough" (group III) and Adenovirus (HAdV, 17.8%) was mainly detected in the "without cough" (group IV). Interpretation: This study describes for the first time the etiology of respiratory infections in febrile children under 5 years in a malaria rural area of Madagascar and highlights the role of respiratory viruses in a well clinically defined population of ARIs. © 2012 Hoffmann et al.

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