ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans

London, United Kingdom

ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans

London, United Kingdom
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Kyriazis M.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans
Biogerontology | Year: 2017

The pace of technology is steadily increasing, and this has a widespread effect on all areas of health and society. When we interact with this technological environment we are exposed to a wide variety of new stimuli and challenges, which may modulate the stress response and thus change the way we respond and adapt. In this Opinion paper I will examine certain aspects of the human–computer interaction with regards to health and ageing. There are practical, everyday effects which also include social and cultural elements. I will discuss how human evolution may be affected by this new environmental change (the hormetic immersion in a virtual/technological environment). Finally, I will also explore certain biological aspects which have direct relevance to the ageing human. By embracing new technologies and engaging with a techno-social ecosystem (which is no longer formed by several interacting species, but by just two main elements: humans and machines), we may be subjected to beneficial hormetic effects, which upregulate the stress response and modulate adaptation. This is likely to improve overall health as we age and, as I speculate here, may also result in the reduction of age-related dysfunction. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht


Cortese F.A.B.,Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies | Cortese F.A.B.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans | Cortese F.A.B.,Ria University Press | Cortese F.A.B.,The Interdisciplinary Center
AAAI Spring Symposium - Technical Report | Year: 2014

We argue that the most effective solution paradigm in machine ethics aiming to maximize safe relations between humans and recursively self-improving AI is to maximize the approximate equality between humans and AGI. We subsequently argue that embedding the concomitant intelligence-amplification of biological humans as a necessary intermediary goal between each successive iteration of recursive self-improvement - such that the AGI conceives of such an intermediary step as a necessary subgoal of its own self-modification - constitutes the best logistical method of maintaining approximate intelligence equality amongst biological humans and recursively self-improving AGI. We ultimately argue that this approach bypasses the seeming impasse of needing to design, develop and articulate a motivational system possessing a top-level utility function that doesn't decay over repeated iterations of recursive self-improvement in order to have a safe recursively self-modifying AGI. Copyright © 2014, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. All rights reserved.


Cortese F.A.B.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans | Santostasi G.,Northwestern University
Rejuvenation Research | Year: 2016

In both biomedicine in general and biomedical gerontology in particular, cell replacement therapy is traditionally proposed as an intervention for cell loss. This article presents a proposed intervention - whole-body induced cell turnover (WICT) - for use in biomedical gerontology that combines cell replacement therapy with a second therapeutic component (targeted cell ablation) so as to broaden the therapeutic utility of cell therapies and increase the categories of age-related damage that are amenable to cell-based interventions. In particular, WICT may allow cell therapies to serve as an intervention for accumulated cellular and intracellular damage, such as telomere depletion, genomic DNA and mitochondrial DNA damage and mutations, replicative senescence, functionally deleterious age-related changes in gene expression, accumulated cellular and intracellular aggregates, and functionally deleterious posttranslationally modified gene products. WICT consists of the gradual ablation and subsequent replacement of a patient's entire set of constituent cells gradually over the course of their adult life span through the quantitative and qualitative coordination of targeted cell ablation with exogenous cell administration. The aim is to remove age-associated cellular and intracellular damage present in the patient's endogenous cells. In this study, we outline the underlying techniques and technologies by which WICT can be mediated, describe the mechanisms by which it can serve to negate or prevent age-related cellular and intracellular damage, explicate the unique therapeutic components and utilities that distinguish it as a distinct type of cell-based intervention for use in biomedical gerontology, and address potential complications associated with the therapy. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2016.


PubMed | ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans and Northwestern University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Rejuvenation research | Year: 2016

In both biomedicine in general and biomedical gerontology in particular, cell replacement therapy is traditionally proposed as an intervention for cell loss. This article presents a proposed intervention-whole-body induced cell turnover (WICT)-for use in biomedical gerontology that combines cell replacement therapy with a second therapeutic component (targeted cell ablation) so as to broaden the therapeutic utility of cell therapies and increase the categories of age-related damage that are amenable to cell-based interventions. In particular, WICT may allow cell therapies to serve as an intervention for accumulated cellular and intracellular damage, such as telomere depletion, genomic DNA and mitochondrial DNA damage and mutations, replicative senescence, functionally deleterious age-related changes in gene expression, accumulated cellular and intracellular aggregates, and functionally deleterious posttranslationally modified gene products. WICT consists of the gradual ablation and subsequent replacement of a patients entire set of constituent cells gradually over the course of their adult life span through the quantitative and qualitative coordination of targeted cell ablation with exogenous cell administration. The aim is to remove age-associated cellular and intracellular damage present in the patients endogenous cells. In this study, we outline the underlying techniques and technologies by which WICT can be mediated, describe the mechanisms by which it can serve to negate or prevent age-related cellular and intracellular damage, explicate the unique therapeutic components and utilities that distinguish it as a distinct type of cell-based intervention for use in biomedical gerontology, and address potential complications associated with the therapy.


Kyriazis M.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans
Current Aging Science | Year: 2014

We live within an increasingly technological, information-laden environment for the first time in human evolution. This subjects us (and will continue to subject us in an accelerating fashion) to an unremitting exposure to 'meaningful information that requires action'. Directly dependent upon this new environment are novel evolutionary pressures, which can modify existing resource allocation mechanisms and may eventually favour the survival of somatic cells (particularly neurons) at the expense of germ line cells. In this theoretical paper I argue that persistent, structured information-sharing in both virtual and real domains, leads to increased biological complexity and functionality, which reflects upon human survival characteristics. Certain biological immortalisation mechanisms currently employed by germ cells may thus need to be downgraded in order to enable somatic cells to manage these new energy demands placed by our modern environment. Relevant concepts from a variety of disciplines such as the evolution of complex adaptive systems, information theory, digital hyper-connectivity, and cell immortalisation will be reviewed. Using logical, though sometimes speculative arguments, I will attempt to describe a new biology. A biology not driven by sex and reproduction but by information and somatic longevity. © 2014 Bentham Science Publishers.


Kyriazis M.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans
Rejuvenation Research | Year: 2014

Editor's Note: A response to this article from Aubrey de Grey, Editor-in-Chief, can be found on pages 397-400 in this issue. The notion that it is possible to eradicate age-related degeneration and live a life with a negligible rate of senescence solely by using a physical "repair- oriented" approach is flawed on a number of fronts. Here, I will argue that there are so many unknown variables embedded in this line of thinking that make the final result impossible to predict. Two relatively easy-to-research areas are the search for successful cross-link breakers and an effective lysosomal degradation therapy. A more complex and speculative strategy is whole-body interdiction of lengthening of telomeres (WILT). Highlighting these as examples, I argue that it is unlikely that such rejuvenation biotechnologies will be used meaningfully by the general public. The discussion assumes that although such therapies may in theory one day be developed in the laboratory, and even possibly be formulated as physical clinical therapies, these will be unusable in practical terms when applied upon humans at large. Due to inherent characteristics of our biological, evolutionary, and psychological heritage, it is implausible that curing aging will occur by using physical interventions alone. © 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Kyriazis M.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans | Apostolides A.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans
Current Aging Science | Year: 2015

The process of aging is a continuum of degeneration which eventually leads to loss of function and clinically manifest disease. Yet, in the purely therapeutic sense, there is a distinct clinical and practical separation between age-related degenerative diseases and the background process of aging itself. It is quite possible that biomedical technologies will prove invaluable in treating or alleviating the impact of distinct age-related degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis or dementia. However, when it comes to addressing the fundamental, background stochastic nature of aging, it is unlikely that regenerative biotechnologies will have any appreciable impact in continually counteracting the process. In this paper we discuss some essential conceptual obstacles, both functional and translational, which will prove overwhelming and which preclude the notion that aging can be eliminated by using physical therapies. Our reasoning is two-fold: 1. Disruptive regenerative biotechnologies interfere with the complex, dynamic topological architecture of the human organism, in a manner that will render them unsuitable for clinical use against all age-related degeneration. 2. Even if some regenerative biotechnological treatments are developed in the laboratory, the translational issues will be insurmountable, and the treatments will thus be practically unusable by the general public at large. Predictions about the near or mid-term development of rejuvenating biotechnologies are not sufficiently grounded, and do not provide a framework for effective practical achievement of negligible senescence. Instead, the answer must lie in more global and abstract methods which align well with evolutionary mechanisms based on techno-cultural societal necessities. These are likely to operate in a way which ultimately may downgrade the importance of human aging and make it an evolutionarily unnecessary process. © 2015 Bentham Science Publishers


Kyriazis M.,ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans
Current Aging Science | Year: 2016

There is no doubt that the world is divided and unequal, mostly with respect to wealth. However, the true obstacle preventing the progress of humanity is not the divide between the rich and the poor. It is the divide between the cognitive and the physical. Apart from the social and ethical issues associated with this, there are also medical ones. The implications of this divide have direct relevance to aging, both in research and in the clinical sense. We cannot simply apply the same ‘healthy aging’ guidelines to everybody, but we need to establish if our approach is specifically suited to the individual. Our research endeavours need to have this division in focus. In this Opinion paper I describe three separate groups of humanity, which are divided, not by economic criteria, but by a worldview of intellectual creativity. Each arbitrary group has its own health priorities. If we overlook these priorities we may, at best, give the wrong advice to our patients, or at worst waste resources and exacerbate the rate of age-related degeneration in many individuals. As our society becomes more reliant on technology, what is now considered ‘healthy’ may not be so, for many millions of people. © 2016 Bentham Science Publishers.


PubMed | ELPIs Foundation for Indefinite Lifespans
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in bioscience (Landmark edition) | Year: 2016

While the current paradigm of research into ageing relies heavily upon reductionist premises, and it has clearly not produced any of the dramatic benefits anticipated in our fight against ageing, the majority of scientists are hesitant, unable or unwilling to consider different or alternative models. In this paper I will discuss some of the shortcomings of a reductionist view of research aimed at finding treatments against ageing degeneration, and I will highlight several areas where proposed future treatments for basic age-related degeneration may be vulnerable to severe criticism. As an alternative model, I will attempt to present a different integrative concept of research which may result in a decrease of the impact of ageing, in participating humans. This model is based on a more inclusive worldview, examining the relationship between humans and their environment, the integration of humans with technology, and the biological consequences of an increasingly techno-cognitive ecosystem.

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