Berlin, Germany
Berlin, Germany

Time filter

Source Type

Brunelli A.,St James's Hospital | Falcoz P.E.,University of Strasbourg | D'amico T.,Duke University | Hansen H.,Copenhagen University | And 26 more authors.
European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVE: To update the recommendations for the structural characteristics of general thoracic surgery (GTS) in Europe in order to provide a document that can be used as a guide for harmonizing the general thoracic surgical practice in Europe. METHODS: A task force was created to set the structural, procedural and qualification characteristics of a European GTS unit. These criteria were endorsed by the Executive Committee of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons and by the Thoracic Domain of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and were validated by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery at European Union of Medical Specialists. RESULTS: Criteria regarding definition and scope of GTS, structure and qualification of GTS unit, training and education and recommendations for subjects of particular interest (lung transplant, oesophageal surgery, minimally invasive thoracic surgery, quality surveillance) were developed. CONCLUSIONS: This document will hopefully represent the first step of a process of revision of the modern thoracic surgeons' curricula, which need to be qualitatively rethought in the setting of the qualification process. The structural criteria highlighted in the present document are meant to help and tackle the challenge of cultural and language barriers as well as of widely varying national training programmes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.


Schneider K.U.,University of Heidelberg | Dietrich D.,Epigenomics AG | Fleischhacker M.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Leschber G.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | And 11 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2011

Background: DNA methylation in the SHOX2 locus was previously used to reliably detect lung cancer in a group of critical controls, including 'cytologically negative' samples with no visible tumor cell content, at a high specificity based on the analysis of bronchial lavage samples. This study aimed to investigate, if the methylation correlates with SHOX2 gene expression and/or copy number alterations. An amplification of the SHOX2 gene locus together with the observed tumor-specific hypermethylation might explain the good performance of this marker in bronchial lavage samples.Methods: SHOX2 expression, gene copy number and DNA methylation were determined in lung tumor tissues and matched morphologically normal adjacent tissues (NAT) from 55 lung cancer patients. Quantitative HeavyMethyl (HM) real-time PCR was used to detect SHOX2 DNA methylation levels. SHOX2 expression was assayed with quantitative real-time PCR, and copy numbers alterations were measured with conventional real-time PCR and array CGH.Results: A hypermethylation of the SHOX2 locus in tumor tissue as compared to the matched NAT from the same patient was detected in 96% of tumors from a group of 55 lung cancer patients. This correlated highly significantly with the frequent occurrence of copy number amplification (p < 0.0001), while the expression of the SHOX2 gene showed no difference.Conclusions: Frequent gene amplification correlated with hypermethylation of the SHOX2 gene locus. This concerted effect qualifies SHOX2 DNA methylation as a biomarker for lung cancer diagnosis, especially when sensitive detection is needed, i.e. in bronchial lavage or blood samples. © 2011 Schneider et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Wilhelm T.,Head Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery | Klemm W.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | Leschber G.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | Harlaar J.J.,Rotterdam University | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery | Year: 2011

Objective: In recent years, several surgical disciplines adopted endoscopic techniques. Presently, natural orifice approaches are under exploration to reduce surgical access trauma. We have developed a trans-oral endoscopic approach for endoscopic mediastinal surgery and have tested this new technique in preclinical studies for feasibility and safety. Methods: We conducted an experimental anatomical study in fresh-frozen cadavers. By a midline, sublingual incision, we placed an optical scissor through a 6.0-mm trocar in the pretracheal region and created a working space; two additional trocars were placed by bi-vestibular incisions in the oral cavity. We visualized and followed the trachea down to the main bronchi. Paratracheal and subcarinal lymph nodes were resected bilaterally; the specimen could be removed through the midline channel. In an additional animal study in pigs, we tested the feasibility and safety for this surgical approach. Anatomical dissection allowed an estimate of collateral damage. Results: In all cases, we could reach the target region endoscopically, and no conversion was necessary. Landmarks (the brachiocervical trunk, the azygos vein, and the pulmonary artery) were visualized easily and kept intact. A working space in the mediastinum could be established by the insufflation of air at 6-8mmHg. It was possible to harvest the specimen through the midline channel. Anatomical dissection of the cervical access route as well as of the mediastinal region showed no collateral damage. In the animal study, we encountered seroma of the surgical field due to the conditions of the animal model. The other outcomes with respect to pain and food intake were normal until the third postoperative day. No local infections occurred. Intraoperative gas exchange was normal and was not influenced by CO 2 insufflation with respect to blood gas analysis. Conclusion: These preclinical studies showed that the mediastinum could be reached by a trans-oral endoscopic approach, based on natural orifice surgery. Complete compartment resection of the paratracheal and subcarinal lymph node stations was possible in a well-defined and clearly visible working space. This approach may enhance the extent of mediastinal resections in oncologic surgery. © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.


Merk J.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | Rolff J.,Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine | Dorn C.,Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine | Leschber G.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | Fichtner I.,Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine
European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery | Year: 2011

Objective: In chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), some patients seem to exhibit an intrinsic resistance or develop an acquired resistance under treatment. Results on resistance markers for possible treatment failure as shown in studies on selected lung cancer cell lines could not be completely confirmed in clinical trials. As these conflicting data require further research, we created a model between cell culture and the clinical need to study this problem. Methods: Our study was based on patient-derived NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model, which revealed a high coincidence with the original tumour. Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of known resistance markers (breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR), lung cancer-related protein (LRP) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1)) were analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunoblotting in 24 xenografts. Chemosensitivity to etoposide, carboplatin, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, cetuximab and erlotinib was determined in in vivo xenograft experiments and compared with the protein and mRNA expression of the multidrug resistance markers. Results: With the exception of a single correlation between chemosensitivity and mRNA expression of etoposide and bcrp (mRNA expression of BCRP), we found no significant correlation between the response rates and protein- and mRNA expression levels in our 24 xenografts. The present results indicate that in vivo expression levels of multidrug resistance proteins and their mRNAs may not play a comparable role in chemoresistance of NSCLC, as pointed out in selected tumour cell lines. Conclusions: Patient-derived xenografts allow detailed investigation of therapy-related markers and their dynamic regulation in a well-standardised and clinically related way. As a consequence of our investigations, we regard multidrug resistance to be a multifactorial phenomenon, in which more factors than the markers analysed by the present study may be involved. © 2011 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.


Schramm A.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | Wormanns D.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | Leschber G.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital | Merk J.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital
Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery | Year: 2011

For resection of lung metastases computed tomography (CT) is needed to determine the operative strategy. A computer-aided detection (CAD) system, a software tool for automated detection of lung nodules, analyses the CT scans in addition to the radiologists and clearly marks lesions. The aim of this feasibility study was to evaluate the reliability of CAD in detecting lung metastases. Preoperative CT scans of 18 patients, who underwent surgery for suspected lung metastases, were analysed with CAD (September-December 2009). During surgery all suspected lesions were traced and resected. Histological examination was performed and results compared to radiologically suspicious nodes. Radiological analysis assisted by CAD detected 64 nodules (mean 3.6, range 1-7). During surgery 91 nodules (mean 5.0, range 1-11) were resected, resulting in 27 additionally palpated nodules. Histologically all these additional nodules were benign. In contrast, all 30 nodules shown to be metastases by histological studies were correctly described by CAD. The CAD system is a sensible and useful tool for finding pulmonary lesions. It detects more and smaller lesions than conventional radiological analysis. In this feasibility study we were able to show a greater reliability of the CAD analysis. A further and prospective study to confirm these data is ongoing. © 2011 Published by European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.


Leschber G.,ELK Berlin Chest Hospital
Thoracic Surgery Clinics | Year: 2014

Complications in tracheal surgery are not uncommon but generally do not influence the final result. Most patients benefit from tracheal resections and mortality is low. Risk factors for complications are reoperations, preoperative tracheostomy, and lengthy resections. Precise information about the extent of the diseased tracheal part as well as thorough planning of the operative procedure, meticulous dissection, and knowledge of release maneuvers by an experienced thoracic surgeon will diminish the risk of adverse effects. Granuloma formation is the most common event observed postoperatively, whereas dehiscence and restenosis or the potentially fatal bleeding from a tracheo-innominate artery fistula occurs less frequently. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | ELK Berlin Chest Hospital
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery | Year: 2010

For resection of lung metastases computed tomography (CT) is needed to determine the operative strategy. A computer-aided detection (CAD) system, a software tool for automated detection of lung nodules, analyses the CT scans in addition to the radiologists and clearly marks lesions. The aim of this feasibility study was to evaluate the reliability of CAD in detecting lung metastases. Preoperative CT scans of 18 patients, who underwent surgery for suspected lung metastases, were analysed with CAD (September-December 2009). During surgery all suspected lesions were traced and resected. Histological examination was performed and results compared to radiologically suspicious nodes. Radiological analysis assisted by CAD detected 64 nodules (mean 3.6, range 1-7). During surgery 91 nodules (mean 5.0, range 1-11) were resected, resulting in 27 additionally palpated nodules. Histologically all these additional nodules were benign. In contrast, all 30 nodules shown to be metastases by histological studies were correctly described by CAD. The CAD system is a sensible and useful tool for finding pulmonary lesions. It detects more and smaller lesions than conventional radiological analysis. In this feasibility study we were able to show a greater reliability of the CAD analysis. A further and prospective study to confirm these data is ongoing.


PubMed | ELK Berlin Chest Hospital, Head Neck & Facial Plastic Surgery and Sana Krankenhaus Gerresheim
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of thoracic disease | Year: 2016

Video-assisted mediastinoscopy (VAM) represents the standard procedure for mediastinal lymph node biopsies. This operation results in a scar at prominent position at the anterior neck. Since there is a trend to less invasive procedures, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) was introduced to different fields of surgery. Based on NOTES we developed a new approach for mediastinoscopy: transoral endoscopic mediastinal surgery (TOEMS). In previous studies using human cadavers and living pigs the feasibility of TOEMS was shown. It was unclear whether TOEMS could be safely applied in patients requiring mediastinal lymph node biopsies.We conducted a clinical phase I study recruiting ten patients with unclear mediastinal lymphadenopathy not resolved by prior bronchoscopy. All patients underwent TOEMS for mediastinal lymph node biopsy. The duration of the procedure and complications were monitored. In addition, all patients were examined for pain, swallowing dysfunction and sensation disturbance.TOEMS was accomplished in eight patients. In two patients operation was converted to VAM due to technical problems. Mediastinal lymph nodes were dissected in all patients who finished with TOEMS. On average, two separate lymph stations were reached by TOEMS. Duration of the procedure was 15922 min. Permanent palsy of the right recurrent laryngeal nerve was noticed in one patient postoperatively.This is the first report for a human application of NOTES in thoracic surgery. In fact, transoral endoscopic surgery seems to be a feasible approach for mediastinal lymph node biopsies. Further studies are needed to show whether this procedure has an advantage over VAM in terms of pain, complications and accessibility of mediastinal lymph node stations.


PubMed | ELK Berlin Chest Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Thoracic surgery clinics | Year: 2013

Complications in tracheal surgery are not uncommon but generally do not influence the final result. Most patients benefit from tracheal resections and mortality is low. Risk factors for complications are reoperations, preoperative tracheostomy, and lengthy resections. Precise information about the extent of the diseased tracheal part as well as thorough planning of the operative procedure, meticulous dissection, and knowledge of release maneuvers by an experienced thoracic surgeon will diminish the risk of adverse effects. Granuloma formation is the most common event observed postoperatively, whereas dehiscence and restenosis or the potentially fatal bleeding from a tracheo-innominate artery fistula occurs less frequently.


PubMed | ELK Berlin Chest Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery | Year: 2011

In chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), some patients seem to exhibit an intrinsic resistance or develop an acquired resistance under treatment. Results on resistance markers for possible treatment failure as shown in studies on selected lung cancer cell lines could not be completely confirmed in clinical trials. As these conflicting data require further research, we created a model between cell culture and the clinical need to study this problem.Our study was based on patient-derived NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model, which revealed a high coincidence with the original tumour. Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of known resistance markers (breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR), lung cancer-related protein (LRP) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1)) were analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunoblotting in 24 xenografts. Chemosensitivity to etoposide, carboplatin, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, cetuximab and erlotinib was determined in in vivo xenograft experiments and compared with the protein and mRNA expression of the multidrug resistance markers.With the exception of a single correlation between chemosensitivity and mRNA expression of etoposide and bcrp (mRNA expression of BCRP), we found no significant correlation between the response rates and protein- and mRNA expression levels in our 24 xenografts. The present results indicate that in vivo expression levels of multidrug resistance proteins and their mRNAs may not play a comparable role in chemoresistance of NSCLC, as pointed out in selected tumour cell lines.Patient-derived xenografts allow detailed investigation of therapy-related markers and their dynamic regulation in a well-standardised and clinically related way. As a consequence of our investigations, we regard multidrug resistance to be a multifactorial phenomenon, in which more factors than the markers analysed by the present study may be involved.

Loading ELK Berlin Chest Hospital collaborators
Loading ELK Berlin Chest Hospital collaborators