Entity

Time filter

Source Type

ELI
Canada

Porter R.,Environmental Law Institute | Kihslinger R.,ELI
Environmental Forum | Year: 2011

The rapid expansion of aquaculture in recent decades has given rise to increased concerns about the environmental and social implications of the industry. Aquaculture has averaged a seven percent annual growth rate since 1970 and now supplies half of all seafood consumed by humans globally each year. Voluntary third-party certification has the potential to fill this gap by encouraging producers to voluntarily reduce the social and environmental impacts of production. Certification appears to be a successful model from an industry perspective, as seafood retailers from Aldi to Walmart have committed to source only certified seafood. The growing importance of certification makes it imperative that these systems equally protect the public's interests by accurately and transparently representing the benefits they provide. The larger certification industry has begun to recognize the importance of improving goal-setting. The International Social and Environmental Labeling Alliance recently finalized a code of good practice for assessing the impacts of certification systems. Source


Bruch C.,Environmental Law Institute | Boulicault M.,ELI | Talati S.,ELI
Environmental Forum | Year: 2012

Peacebuilding efforts and international environmental law have developed independently and in very different manners. There have been efforts to develop common approaches and standardize procedures, but organizations and individuals seeking to build the foundations for a durable peace still operate under a variety of guiding frameworks. Natural resources are recognized as crucial to establishing a lasting settlement, as they can both unite and divide post-conflict societies. The natural resources that are relevant to post-conflict peacebuilding fall into four broad categories, extractive natural resources, land, water, and renewable resources other than land and water. Climate change has been increasingly viewed as a threat to national security and international peace. Numerous United Nations agencies are engaged in aspects of post-conflict peacebuilding from reintegration of former combatants to livelihoods and economic development. At the same time, the Security Council is becoming involved in creating the foundation for long-term peace. Source


Kihslinger R.L.,Environmental Law Institute | McElfish J.M.,ELI
Environmental Forum | Year: 2010

Communities, public agencies, and developers that make habitat conservation an important objective of their plans, policies, and projects will be increasingly important conservation agents. Communities, public agencies, and developers that make habitat conservation an important objective of their plans, policies, and projects will be increasingly important conservation agents. Nature-friendly developers can also make substantial contributions to land conservation in the context of development. Green development plans can preserve open space and protect critical habitat, while improving overall environmental quality by reducing motor vehicle use, promoting redevelopment of older industrial and commercial sites, and reducing impervious surfaces. Although state and federal governments and some regional authorities play a role in regulating and managing land, local governments have most of the responsibility for making land use decisions. The ability to gather and interpret the scientific information necessary to think at broader scales is made more difficult because many local planning departments operate with a small paid staff and stretched budgets. Source


Bruch C.,Environmental Law Institute ELI | Boulicault M.,ELI | Talati S.,ELI | Jensen D.,United Nations Environment Programme UNEP
Review of European Community and International Environmental Law | Year: 2012

Since the end of the Cold War, peacebuilding efforts and international environmental law have developed independently and in very different manners. Experiences in managing natural resources to support post-conflict peacebuilding in dozens of countries over the past twenty years, however, highlight the critical role that natural resources often play. The 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) provides an opportunity to consider the lessons from these experiences and provide a vision for future consolidation of approaches. This article reviews the development of peacebuilding, highlighting the importance of natural resources. It then surveys the status of international law governing post-conflict peacebuilding, including international environmental law. Looking forward, it considers the likely directions of international law in governing post-conflict peacebuilding, concluding with thoughts on how to capitalize on Rio+20 to advance more effective approaches. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations