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News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Traditions at Chesterfield, a Smart Growth community located within the 500-acre Old York Village in Burlington County, has unveiled its highly anticipated Presidents’ Day incentive. Purchase a quick delivery single-family home at the award-winning community by February 28th and receive an additional $10,000 incentive. Call 609-424-0026 for a tour of available homes. “Our Presidents’ Day promotion allows homebuyers to save money and take advantage of a quick move-in,” said Barry Edelman, Managing Partner for Traditions at Chesterfield. “This is a great opportunity for first-time homebuyers, as well as families looking to settle into a new home right away.” Buyers must use builder’s preferred lender, Caliber Home Loans. Traditions at Chesterfield currently has three single-family homes available for quick delivery: The Alexandria, Richmond and Roanoke home designs. “These designs boast upgraded features like master bedroom tray ceiling, recessed lighting, stainless steel appliances and hardwood flooring in the foyer, dining room and second floor hall,” said Edelman. “Homes are also located in close proximity to Chesterfield Elementary School, future parks and shopping at Old York Village.” The Alexandria single-family quick delivery home, located at 40 Canter Place, features 2,982 sq. ft. of living space with four bedrooms, two-and-a-half baths and a two-car garage. The base price of this home is $453,990, plus a lot premium of $10,000 and an added $28,229 in upgrades. After $32,219 in incentives, the total purchase price is $460,000. The Richmond single-family quick delivery home, located at 10 Canter Place, features 2,600 sq. ft. of living space with four bedrooms, two-and-a-half baths and a two-car garage. The base price of this home is $452,990, plus a lot premium of $15,000 and an added $26,846 in upgrades. After $34,836 in incentives, the total purchase price is $460,000. The Roanoke single-family quick delivery home, located at 3 Canter Place, features 2,998 sq. ft. of living space with four bedrooms, three baths and a two-car garage. The base price of this home is $471,990 with an added $37,543 in upgrades. After $29,533 in incentives, the total purchase price of this home is $480,000. All single-family homes feature award-winning, neo-traditional designs in a quaint neighborhood setting. “Perfect for entertaining, these quick delivery homes offer spacious family rooms and living rooms that feature world-class appointments,” Edelman added. Traditions at Chesterfield is ideally located in Chesterfield, voted “#1 Best Place to Live in Burlington County” by Philadelphia Magazine. Situated within Old York Village, the community is in close proximity to parks, a playground, biking trails, open space and future retail. The New Jersey Turnpike, I-295 and Hamilton Train Station are all easily accessible to Traditions at Chesterfield for commuting to Philadelphia or New York City. Residents will find entertainment at nearby Six Flags Great Adventure and Mercer County Park and shopping at the Jackson Outlets. A new elementary school is located adjacent to centralized recreation facilities, adding extra convenience for families with young children. “With the convenience of nearby shopping and entertainment and the serenity of guaranteed green space for years to come, it’s a wonderful place for families of all ages to call home,” said Edelman. Interested homebuyers can visit the Traditions at Chesterfield Sales Office, located at 7 Borden Lane, Chesterfield, NJ. The Sales Office is open from 10am to 5pm daily. To take advantage of these limited-time incentives, schedule an appointment with an on-site sales consultant by calling 609.424.0026. For more information, visit http://www.traditionsatchesterfield.com.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

As the national attention to fake news and the debate over what to do about it continue, one place many are looking for solutions is in the classroom. Since a recent Stanford study showed that students at practically all grade levels can't determine fake news from the real stuff, the push to teach media literacy has gained new momentum. The study showed that while students absorb media constantly, they often lack the critical thinking skills needed to tell fake news from the real stuff. Teachers are taking up the challenge to change that. NPR Ed put out a social media call asking how educators are teaching fake news and media literacy, and we got a lot of responses. Here's a sampling from around the country: In Scott Bedley's version of Simon Says, it's not those two magic words that keep you in the game, but deciding correctly whether a news story is real or not. To start off the game, Bedley sends his fifth-graders at Plaza Vista School in Irvine, Calif., an article to read on their laptops. He gives them about three minutes to make their decision — they have to read the story carefully, examine its source and use their judgment. Those who think the article is false, stand up. The "true" believers stay in their seats. Bedley says he's been trying to teach his students for a while to look carefully at what they're reading and where it comes from. He's got a seven-point checklist his students can follow: 1. Do you know who the source is, or was it created by a common or well-known source? Example National Geographic, Discovery, etc. 2. How does it compare to what you already know? 3. Does the information make sense? Do you understand the information? 4. Can you verify that the information agrees with three or more other sources that are also reliable? 5. Have experts in the field been connected to it or authored the information? 6. How current is the information? 7. Does it have a copyright? Bedley also teamed up recently with Todd Flory at Wheatland Elementary School in Wichita, Kan., to do a fake news challenge via Skype. Flory's fourth-graders chose two real articles and wrote a fake article of their own. Then, they presented them to Bedley's class in California. The fifth-graders had four minutes to do some extra research based on the presentations, and then they decided which article out of the three were fake. Most importantly, they had to explain why they thought it was fake. Otherwise, no points. Flory says writing the fake news article was more difficult for his students than they expected because they had to make it believable. "It really hammered home the idea to them that fake news doesn't have to be too sensational," he says. "It can be a very subtle change, but that subtle change can have big consequences." Every Friday, Flory's class participates in what he calls Genius Hour. His students propose a question to answer through online research. But before they took to the Internet, Flory had to walk his students through the steps: What are reliable and trusted websites? How do you effectively search on the Internet and verify information? He uses Skype to connect his students with researchers and scientists from all over the world. He calls this "authentic research." "It's so much more powerful for them to do some of this authentic research when they're able to hear from a scientist who's seeing firsthand the effects of climate change," Flory says. This year's class got to talk to a penguin scientist. Flory says he's not only teaching his students effective media literacy skills; he is also helping them to be better citizens through global engagement and interaction. Remember Marie Antoinette and "Let them eat cake" — her famous line about the poor that got her in all that trouble? Thing is, it never happened. Fake news! For Diane Morey and her ninth-graders at Danvers High School in Danvers, Mass., that's a teachable moment. "The media of the day didn't have Facebook, Twitter or partisan websites," Morey says. "But they did have pamphlets." She shows her class cartoons and pamphlets from the French Revolutionary period that criticized Antoinette, and then discusses the conclusions that were made from those sources. She also includes a primary source: a letter written by Antoinette. Morey says history is rich with examples of fake news, and since source analysis is the core of her lesson plans, she doesn't need a textbook. "We don't study [history] to memorize Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI," she explains. "We're studying this because we can see this happening in the current-day political climate." Morey encourages students to bring in examples of articles from today's news that don't ring true. "Once you expose it to them," she says, "it's like a game for them, seeing, 'Hey, I'm not sure I can trust this.' " For 13 years, Larry Ferlazzo has been teaching kids who are learning English how to read and write. Now, he's adding another layer: helping them figure out if what they're reading is true. Ferlazzo teaches at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento, Calif. He's also a blogger and journalist. Last month, he wrote a lesson plan on addressing fake news to English language learners (ELLs), which was published in The New York Times. He says media literacy is especially important for ELLs for two reasons. First, they're not fluent in the language they're reading, adding an extra level of difficulty in deciding what to believe. On top of that, false or exaggerated news about immigration could have a major impact on their lives. His lesson starts off with a few examples of reliable and fake news. Then, some basic journalism stuff: Students identify the different parts of the news, from the "lede" to quotations. They enter all that into a diagram on paper so they have a visual representation of what they're reading. That diagram eventually becomes a guide for students to write their own fake news lede that they can share with other classmates or post on a class blog. In 2015, Spencer Brayton and his colleague Natasha Casey revamped a media literacy course for students at Blackburn College in Carlinville, Ill. Brayton says the key is the critical approach. "Students come in expecting that we're going to lecture," Brayton explains. "But we have them think about certain power structures in how information is produced and how it reaches them. If they're going to understand how they're going to take it in, then they have to know how the news is going to be produced." To take the class, students need a Twitter account. From the very first week, they are asked to follow five to 10 accounts on Twitter that promote media and information literacy, like Media Literacy Now or Renee Hobbs. As they follow these posts and add additional ones, the goal is that they'll start to recognize fake news and other biases or viewpoints in media. By the end of the course, Brayton says students begin to see themselves not only as creators of information, but as credible sources of information too. The Twitter assignments encourage his students to engage with social media - retweeting, following and commenting — which Brayton says helps his students see how they play a role in spreading information to other media consumers. That means they have to take what they share more seriously. "In looking at this issue, people seem to want a quick solution to fake news, but I'm not sure there is a solution (at least an easy one)," Brayton writes in an email. "Students need to recognize that these skills and ideas need to stay with them through adulthood, but that's easier said than done — we all fall into this trap."


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

KC Healthy Kids, a nonprofit dedicated to improving the health of Greater Kansas City's children, has announced the recipients of six $1,000 first place awards for I Am Here, the nonprofit’s youth photo contest designed to empower students to speak out for healthy communities. The winning classrooms will use their awards to promote student wellness. The grade level winning classrooms are: 3rd Grade: Whittier Elementary, Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools, Teacher: Kristina Kidwell 4th Grade: Edgerton Elementary, Gardner Edgerton School District, Teacher: Crysta Baier 5th Grade: Stony Point Elementary, Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools, Teacher: Ray Lipovac 6th Grade, Dobbs Elementary School, Hickman Mills School District, Teacher: Sharon Ford-Parker 7th Grade, the Barstow School, Teacher: Sarah Holmes 8th Grade, Scuola Vita Nuova Charter, Teacher: Drew Carey (Afternoon Class) At a ceremony on March 2, the students will give “Shark Tank” style presentations and ask audience members to support their projects. A grand prize winner will be announced and that school will take home a total of $2500 to make a lasting change in their community. The awards ceremony is at 11:30 a.m. at the Kansas City Convention Center at 301 W 13th Street, Kansas City Mo 64105. Tickets can be purchased online at https://www.kchealthykids.org/product/2017-champions-health-youth-summit-sponsorship-tickets/ Through the contest, teachers helped students think critically about how their surroundings – walking trails or broken sidewalks, safe playgrounds or blighted lots, schoolyard gardens or fast food restaurants – impact their health. Hundreds of students were involved in the contest and submitted captioned photos illustrating how their communities help and hinder healthy habits. This year, the awards ceremony will take place over lunch during KC Healthy Kids’ new youth summit, “Champions for Health.” At this all-day conference, 200 students who participated in the contest will learn to speak out for healthier food in schools, walkable communities, urban farms, gardens and more. Event sponsorships and single tickets are available online. Proceeds help KC Healthy Kids reshape our region for a brighter future. Funds raised also benefit Greater Kansas City's schools through I Am Here’s cash awards. KC Healthy Kids’ I am Here Photo Contest started in 2013. It has now evolved into a comprehensive program for schools and community groups known as I am Here Youth Advocacy program. This program teaches students how their surroundings impact their health and how to create change through advocacy. I am Here Photo Contest is a fun and easy way for students to get a feel for advocacy and have a chance to win $2,500 for health and wellness projects at their schools. _________________________________________________ About KC Healthy Kids KC Healthy Kids rallies the people in our communities to improve access to affordable fresh food and safe places to walk and play. When our neighborhoods support healthy habits, we are less likely to suffer from obesity, which is linked to Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and poor mental health. To make a lasting impact, we shape policies that improve our food system and physical surroundings and, ultimately, the places where we live, work, learn, and play.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China, more than 400,000 elementary and secondary schools in China have faced the threat of closure in the past two decades, due to their geographically remote locations and limited educational resources. Twenty years after China's national education reform, however, rural schools are undergoing a radical change for the better. Local school enrollment rates have improved dramatically through the adoption of online learning models. So much so, in fact, that even students from nearby urban centers are traveling to rural areas for a better education. What is it that is making such a huge impact? Recently, the China Global Television Network (CGTN) made a series of special reports on how China's small-scaled rural schools have survived such a dilemma. The reports show that many schools are choosing to embrace online education, and are actively collaborating with the Hu+ (Hujia) Project, a K-12 educational charity program launched by Hujiang EdTech, China's leading online education company, in order to address these problems. Currently, there are about 140,000 rural schools in China enrolling fewer than 200 students each. Most are facing similar dilemmas, e.g., falling enrollment numbers, severe teacher shortages, and a lack of resources to properly deliver their curriculums. Here are some success stories: Xindian Elementary School, located in Yibin prefecture, Sichuan Province, has fewer than twenty people in the entire school, including sixteen students and three teachers. Unfortunately, the students there seemed destined to struggle with educational inequality. The situation changed, however, once teachers in big cities, thousands of miles away, started teaching these students online through the Hu+ project, which provides online education tools and other resources, free of charge, to elementary and middle schools in rural and underdeveloped areas in China, and helps them develop innovative online curriculums. The Project not only offers the students diversified and multifunctional online classes, it also trains teachers to use novel methods to deliver their lessons online. Zou Changjiang, a teacher from Xindian Elementary School, has been involved with the Hu+ Project since October 2015. Like most traditional rural teachers, Zou found it difficult to teach using modern technologies. Now, after several attempts, he is able to teach using online curriculums and even introduce the Hu+ Project to other new teachers. "Online courses can provide us with more learning materials for children who lack educational resources", Zou said, "Even teachers like ourselves, are able to learn from teachers in big cities and grow together." Zou witnessed a significant change: After using the newly introduced online model, his students became more confident and talkative than ever before. Without a doubt, the internet expanded these students' horizons and showed them a world with fewer barriers. Another elementary school named Beijiao, in Changzhou, Jiangsu Province, 125 miles from China's eastern metropolis, Shanghai, recently explored an innovative way to provide more courses for its students at affordable costs. The school has been using crowd funding to purchase online courses, aiming to provide better educational resources for its students. As school funds are limited, both the school and parents share the costs of these courses. The idea of crowd funding originates from China's popular way of doing business on e-commerce platforms. Products and services are often available at significantly reduced rates once a minimum number of customers choose to buy them. According to CGTN reports, the school has used crowd funding to offer nearly sixty courses since last summer, covering a range of topics from reading to writing, and English storytelling to singing. All of these courses are supported by CCtalk, a real-time interactive educational platform from Hujiang EdTech. Although some parents doubted its feasibility at first, most have welcomed the idea, as children have responded positively to the courses. Back in Sichuan Province, Liangshuijing Middle School has undergone major curriculum reform over the past two decades and has improved its overall situation. It is not easy to find classrooms in rural China as busy and bustling as the ones here. Usually a student will be named class representative and take a leadership role in the classroom, at times substituting for the teacher. The teacher's role, in fact, has gone from teacher to coach. Wu Ge, the vice principal of Liangshuijing Middle School wants students to develop their own characters, rather than just becoming 'exam machines'. "Being a better person is more important than anything else", Wu said. With the success of Liangshuijing's curriculum reform, the school began to try internet courses in September 2015. Although a late-starter compared with other schools, its progress in adopting the new approach has been incredible. By collaborating with the Hu+ Project, students now have access to high-quality online art courses, and school activities are livestreamed via CCtalk. Teachers and students can also share their progress through Hujiang EdTech's online learning community. As a result of those specific efforts, half of the students passed the local senior entrance examination and were admitted to prestigious senior high schools in 2016. This remote school has even attracted some students from nearby cities to enroll. As the headmaster of Liangshuijing Middle School, Long Yunjun, said, "schools in the future will tend to be more boundless and without walls". To other educators like Long, in the rest of China, education reform is a never-ending endeavor. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hu-project-is-revitalizing-chinas-rural-schools-300409478.html


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Since 1990, campuses nationwide have experienced amazing outcomes with Capturing Kids’ Hearts tools and processes, creating the socio-emotional safety conducive to learning. Through the National Showcase Schools awards, the Flippen Group is again recognizing and celebrating schools that go the extra mile each day, building an environment where students are relationally connected and eager to learn. These 57 campuses are being considered for this honor for the 2016-2017 school year: 1) Andrew Jackson Middle School, Grand Prairie, Texas ● Principal Robert Wallace 2) Anson Jones Elementary, Bryan, Texas ● Principal Linda Montoya 3) Ash Fork Schools, Ash Fork, Arizona ● Superintendent Seth Staples* 4) Bagdad Elementary, Milton, Florida ● Principal Daniel Baxley 5) Camp Verde Middle School, Camp Verde, Arizona ● Principal Danny Howe* 6) Canyon Creek Elementary, Austin, Texas ● Principal April Crawford 7) Central Elementary, Nevada, Iowa ● Principal Joel Fey 8) Challenger Intermediate, Goddard, Kansas ● Principal Jess Herbig 9) Conner Creek Academy East, Roseville, Michigan ● Principal/Assistant Superintendent Karen Smith* 10) Community Outreach Academy, McClellan, California ● Principal Larissa Gonchar 11) Country Meadows Elementary, Peoria, Arizona ● Principal Val Barrett* 12) Crockett Elementary, Bryan, Texas ● Principal Debi Ehrhardt 13) Diane Patrick Elementary, Grand Prairie, Texas ● Principal Matt Brown 14) E.C. Mason Elementary, Manvel, Texas ● Principal Renea Rivas 15) East Ridge Elementary, Sweetwater, Texas ● Principal Vicki Mayberry 16) Emery Elementary, Katy, Texas ● Principal Michelle Merricks 17) Forest North Elementary, Austin, Texas ● Principal Amy Jacobs 18) Fort Elementary, Royse City, Texas ● Principal Danette Dodson 19) Freeman Elementary, Haysville, Kansas ● Principal, Dr. Donna Ferguson 20) Fronteras Spanish Immersion Charter, Wasilla, Alaska ● Principal Jennifer Hutchins 21) Gateway International School, Sacramento, California ● Principal Joi Tikoi 22) Goddard Middle School, Goddard, Kansas ● Principal Lisa Hogarth 23) Gower West Elementary, Willowbrook, Illinois ● Principal Gina Rodewald* 24) Grand Prairie Fine Arts Academy, Grand Prairie, Texas ● Principal Maria Schell 25) Haysville West Middle School, Haysville, Kansas ● Principal Ildo Martins 26) Jim Maples Academy, Porterville, California ● Principal Mitzie Styles 27) Johnson Elementary, Bryan, Texas ● Principal Amy Newbold* 28) Knightdale High School of Collaborative Design, Knightdale, North Carolina ● Principal, Dr. James Argent 29) Liberty Middle School, Liberty, Texas ● Principal Rhonda Smith 30) Memminger School of Global Studies, Charleston, South Carolina ● Principal, Dr. Abigail Woods 31) Miss May Vernon Elementary, Fate, Texas ● Principal Shannon Hayes 32) Nelson Elementary, Haysville, Kansas ● Principal Mike Mitchener 33) New Temple Elementary, South El Monte, California ● Principal John Gannon 34) O'Neal Elementary School, Poplar Bluff, Missouri ● Principal Amy Dill 35) Oak Grove Elementary, Porterville, California ● Principal Troy Hayes 36) Ocotillo Elementary, Palmdale, California ● Principal Larry Lueck 37) Pine Grove Elementary, Avon, Connecticut ● Principal Jess Giannini 38) Pioneer Continuation High School, Redding, California ● Principal Els Prigmore 39) Poplar Bluff Junior High School, Poplar Bluff, Missouri ● Principal Bob Case 40) Pray-Woodman Elementary, Maize, Kansas ● Principal Nils Gabrielson 41) RB Stall High School, North Charleston, South Carolina ● Principal Jeremy Carrick* 42) Ridgegate Elementary, Houston, Texas ● Principal Felicia Holmes 43) Ruth Clark Elementary, Wichita, Kansas ● Principal Carla Wulf 44) Sacramento Academic & Vocational Academy, Sacramento, California ● Principal Morri Elliott 45) Sherrod Elementary, Palmer, Alaska ● Principal Dan Michael* 46) Southeast Elementary, Sweetwater, Texas ● Principal Peggy Elliott 47) St. James Middle School, St. James, Missouri ● Principal Kaaren Lepper 48) Stephen F. Austin Middle School, Bryan, Texas ● Principal, Dr. Brandon Jayroe 49) Summit Charter Academy Lombardi Campus, Porterville, California ● Principal Treasure Weisenberger 50) Sweetwater High School, Sweetwater, Texas ● Principal, Dr. Ron Morris 51) Taft High School, Taft, Texas ● Principal Angel Lopez* 52) Thunderbolt Middle School, Lake Havasu, Arizona ● Principal Mari Jo Mulligan* 53) Turtle Bay School, Redding, California ● Principal A.J. Anderson 54) Union Hill Elementary, Round Rock, Texas ● Principal Kim Connelly 55) Vandagriff Elementary, Aledo, Texas ● Principal Stephanie Covington 56) Voigt Elementary, Round Rock, Texas ● Principal Cheryl Hester 57) Wasilla High School, Wasilla, Alaska ● Principal Carol Boatman* *Indicates schools that received a Capturing Kids’ Hearts National Showcase Schools award for the 2015-2016 school year and have again been nominated to be considered for the 2016-2017 awards. The typical classroom is comprised of twenty or more students with diverse family backgrounds and expectations for behavior, randomly assembled into a cohort, and required to learn together. Too often, the impact of peer pressure and outside influences create a classroom culture that passively or even actively resists learning. Teachers are tasked with raising the bar on student performance while competing against social, environmental, and outside pressures as never before. While researchers and officials work to determine the most effective curricula, teachers struggle to manage their classrooms and meet parental and administrator’s expectations. How can today’s teacher transform a classroom from a disruptive, reactive environment into a place where put-downs and criticism dissipate, and students’ minds become actively engaged in learning? The Flippen Group, a national professional development provider founded by Flip Flippen in 1990, believes what the research demonstrates - that students are most likely to succeed when they are emotionally safe and able to reconnect with their natural curiosity. Flippen Group processes provide educators the skills they need to change the trajectory of students’ lives. Openness replaces defensiveness. Judging and feelings of being judged are replaced with acceptance and real connectedness to the school. “Discipline problems nearly non-existent,” and “Academic achievement constantly improving,” are common feedback following implementation of the highly acclaimed Capturing Kids’ Hearts processes. The Flippen Group believes that when unsung education heroes produce exemplary outcomes in schools and pave the way for other schools to follow, they need and deserve recognition for a job well done. Please join us in congratulating and honoring these schools and their leaders for their dedication and commitment! For more information about the Capturing Kids’ Hearts National Showcase Schools awards, contact: Tanya Peterson Flippen Group Office Phone: 1-800-316-4311 Office Fax: 1-877-941-4700 info(at)flippengroup(dot)com http://www.flippengroup.com


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Prologic Technology Systems, Inc., a K-12 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software developer, announced today that Palestine Independent School District (PISD) has selected the TEAMS ERP solution as an integrated platform for Finance, HR/Payroll, and Student Information Systems for their district. Palestine ISD is home to Palestine High School, Palestine Junior High School, Story Intermediate School, Southside Elementary School, Northside Primary School and Washington Early Childhood Center. Palestine ISD CFO, David Atkeisson stated that they decided to move forward with TEAMS because of “the cloud-based system, electronic workflow, substitute assignment capabilities, digital documentation and storage options, and the all-in-one database. It was also appealing that TEAMS is concentrated on Texas Districts only, at a reasonable price point. We’re looking forward to having all of our data in one place, in a user-friendly platform.” “Palestine ISD’s selection of TEAMS is affirmation that our focus on user-centric, automated solutions are providing high-level efficiencies to districts all over Texas,” stated Jeff Pepper, President of Prologic Technology Systems, Inc. Prologic is the first advanced technology solution for K-12 school district administration and student management. Prologic’s Total Education Administrative Management Solution (TEAMS ERP™) seamlessly bridges the silos of finance, human resource and student information into a single, cohesive database capable of real-time reporting and simplified collaboration among district teachers, students, administrators and parents. TEAMS ERP is ideal for school districts requiring a robust, yet easy-to-use system that is highly scalable and configurable. Prologic has been solely focused on delivering intelligent software solutions to the K-12 market since 1992. The company is headquartered in Austin, Texas.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Louisville Real Estate Pros of Keller Williams Realty Louisville East recently helped a buyer purchase a single family home in the Germantown neighborhood. This home includes 2 bedrooms and 2 full bathrooms. Louisville, KY, March 01, 2017 --( The amenities of the area are abundant. The home is walking distance from Emerson Park for an everyday opportunity to enjoy the outdoors. Close proximity to shopping and dining establishments provide plenty of choices for entertainment. Nearby access to both Eastern Parkway and I-65 makes a commute to anywhere in Louisville, KY a breeze. Schools within the Jefferson County School District nearest this home in Germantown are Camp Taylor Elementary School (grades K-5), Mayzeek Middle School (grades 6-8), and Seneca High School (grades 9-12). The Jefferson County Public School District serves over 100,000 students and employs over 14,400 people. There are currently 54 single family residences and condominiums listed for sale in the 40217 zip code. 13 of these properties are active with no other current offers. Pam Ruckriegel with Louisville Real Estate Pros at Keller Williams Realty Louisville East has extensive experience buying and selling homes in and around the Louisville, KY area. Most recently, the team worked with clients in Louisville, Oldham County, Spencer County, Shelby County, Bullitt County, and Nelson County. The Louisville Real Estate Pros continue to provide quality customer service to all their past and present clients through both personal and mixed media contact. Louisville, KY, March 01, 2017 --( PR.com )-- This 1,440 square foot Germantown home was purchased at about a 5.8% decrease from the original listing price. The home has 2 bedrooms and 2 full bathrooms; it is recently updated with new hardwood flooring, HVAC, and new kitchen appliances. It is in the 40217 zip code.The amenities of the area are abundant. The home is walking distance from Emerson Park for an everyday opportunity to enjoy the outdoors. Close proximity to shopping and dining establishments provide plenty of choices for entertainment. Nearby access to both Eastern Parkway and I-65 makes a commute to anywhere in Louisville, KY a breeze.Schools within the Jefferson County School District nearest this home in Germantown are Camp Taylor Elementary School (grades K-5), Mayzeek Middle School (grades 6-8), and Seneca High School (grades 9-12). The Jefferson County Public School District serves over 100,000 students and employs over 14,400 people.There are currently 54 single family residences and condominiums listed for sale in the 40217 zip code. 13 of these properties are active with no other current offers.Pam Ruckriegel with Louisville Real Estate Pros at Keller Williams Realty Louisville East has extensive experience buying and selling homes in and around the Louisville, KY area. Most recently, the team worked with clients in Louisville, Oldham County, Spencer County, Shelby County, Bullitt County, and Nelson County.The Louisville Real Estate Pros continue to provide quality customer service to all their past and present clients through both personal and mixed media contact. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Louisville Real Estate Pros


One of Only a Chosen Few Women Honored by NJBIZ Magazine ​Monica C. Smith, CEO of Marketsmith Inc., the nation’s fastest-growing, women-owned, data-driven integrated marketing agency, has been named among NJBIZ Magazine’s 100 Most Powerful People in New Jersey Business.  According to the magazine, “We feel our Power 100 list reflects the most important, influential, successful and — of course — powerful people in the state.” A visionary entrepreneur with a passion for data, Smith has achieved an unprecedented level of success at launching start-ups and turning them into industry standard-bearers.  She founded Marketsmith, Inc. in 1999 and i.Predictus in 2011, and led the acquisition of Brushfire in 2015. Inc. Magazine ranked the company as the #1 Woman-Led Company in the New York metropolitan area and #5 nationwide.  In August 2015, Marketsmith was ranked #97 in the Inc. 5000. Smith moved up the ranks to No. 91 of the Power 100 list this year from No. 93 in 2016.  She first appeared on the list in 2015 at No. 95. Interestingly, only 17 percent of those cited were women, yet women make up more than half of the state’s population. "Monica’s influence extends far beyond the state of New Jersey, and she is recognized in the marketing, advertising and technology industries as a leading national player,” says Marketsmith President Jill Draper. Marketsmith’s evolution and impact is driven by Smith’s desire to bring a strong focus and accountability to marketing tactics, specifically in media and digital performance by ensuring business outcomes through advanced analytics.  For three straight years, Smith has driven over $1.5 billion in retail sales annually.  She is responsible for the management of $200 million of media spend annually (about 10% of all DRTV inventory), and is one of only a few women who have successfully raised capital in the tech arena. Draper continues, “The most important thing to know about Monica's influence and power is that it is contagious!  She leads by example and attracts the best and the brightest, whether that’s here at Marketsmith or at any of the non-profit organizations and boards in which she participates.” In addition to building world-class companies, Smith’s unparalleled desire to make a real difference in the world has led to the creation of charitable initiatives that she and her team are passionately committed. One More Smith, a 501(c)(3) that is a permanent home and sanctuary for hard to place cats and other animals - many with disabilities - has housed thousands since its inception in 2004.  Bring Dinner Home, an annual Thanksgiving event, provides nutritious holiday dinners for hundreds of impoverished families of school children at the Camden Street Elementary School in Newark and now supports the Cedar Hill Community After School Program in Boonton NJ. She and her spouse, Amy, reside in Chester, NJ and have 5 adopted children. Marketsmith Inc. is a full-service, woman-owned media and creative agency that specializes in data analytics to drive better outcomes for our clients. Marketsmith is comprised of analysts, researchers, and innovators within a culture that values transparency, raises talent, and thrives in collaboration. Our goal is to use data to optimize brand communication and deliver greater ROI across all channels. Most importantly, Marketsmith does great work to do good things!  For more information, please visit: www.marketsmithinc.com.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Pack 229 held their annual Pinewood Derby Race at Harper Elementary School in Princeton, Texas on Saturday.


Louisville Real Estate Pros of Keller Williams Realty Louisville East recently sold a single family residence located on Maldon Dr. in the popular area of Pleasure Ridge Park in Louisville, KY. This ranch-style home includes 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, and 1 half bathroom. Louisville, KY, March 01, 2017 --( The area of Pleasure Ridge Park is located within Jefferson County, in close proximity to Shively, Kentucky. Quick access to major highways like I-264 and Dixie Highway make for an easy commute to anywhere in the city. Nearby Iroquois Park, located less than 6 miles away, is the perfect place for residents to enjoy the beauty of the outdoors. Schools nearest to the property are Shacklette Elementary School (grades K-5), Conway Middle School (grades 6-8), and Western High School (grades 9-12). The Jefferson County Public School District serves over 100,000 students; that’s 1 out of every 7 students in the state. There are currently 192 single family residences and condominiums listed for sale in the 40216 zip code. 86 of these properties are active with no other current offers. Pam Ruckriegel with Louisville Real Estate Pros at Keller Williams Realty Louisville East has extensive experience buying and selling homes in and around the Louisville, KY area. Most recently, the team worked with clients in Louisville, Oldham County, Spencer County, Shelby County, Bullitt County, and Nelson County. The Louisville Real Estate Pros continue to provide quality customer service to all their past and present clients through both personal and mixed media contact. Louisville, KY, March 01, 2017 --( PR.com )-- This PRP home includes 1,650 square feet of total living space. The home has 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, and 1 half bathroom. There is also a deck overlooking the spacious tree-filled back yard and a walkout basement. The home is in the 40216 zip code.The area of Pleasure Ridge Park is located within Jefferson County, in close proximity to Shively, Kentucky. Quick access to major highways like I-264 and Dixie Highway make for an easy commute to anywhere in the city. Nearby Iroquois Park, located less than 6 miles away, is the perfect place for residents to enjoy the beauty of the outdoors.Schools nearest to the property are Shacklette Elementary School (grades K-5), Conway Middle School (grades 6-8), and Western High School (grades 9-12). The Jefferson County Public School District serves over 100,000 students; that’s 1 out of every 7 students in the state.There are currently 192 single family residences and condominiums listed for sale in the 40216 zip code. 86 of these properties are active with no other current offers.Pam Ruckriegel with Louisville Real Estate Pros at Keller Williams Realty Louisville East has extensive experience buying and selling homes in and around the Louisville, KY area. Most recently, the team worked with clients in Louisville, Oldham County, Spencer County, Shelby County, Bullitt County, and Nelson County.The Louisville Real Estate Pros continue to provide quality customer service to all their past and present clients through both personal and mixed media contact. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Louisville Real Estate Pros

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