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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Washington, DC (May 10, 2017) Most human interactions with robots come from behind a screen. Whether it's fiction or a real-life interaction, rarely are we put face to face with a robot. This poses a significant barrier when we look towards a future where robots will be part of our everyday lives. How do we break down this barrier? A recent study by researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Wurzburg, and Arts Electronica Futurelab, found that people who watched live interactions with a robot were more likely to consider the robot to have more human-like qualities. Constanze Schreiner (University of Koblenz-Landau), Martina Mara (Ars Electronica Futuerlab), and Markus Appel (University of Wurzburg) will present their findings at the 67th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in San Diego, CA. Using a Roboy robot, participants observed one of three experimental human robot interactons (HRI); either in real life, in virtual reality (VR) on a 3D screen, or on a 2D screen. The scripted HRI between Roboy and the human technician was 4:25 minutes long. During that time, participants saw Roboy assisting the human in organizing appointments, conducting web searches and finding a birthday present for his mom. The data analyzed revealed that observing a live interaction or alternatively encountering the robot in a VR lead to more perceived realness. Furthermore, the kind of presentation influenced perceived human-likeness. Participants who observed a real HRI reported the highest perceived human-likeness. Particularly interesting is that participants who were introduced to Roboy in VR perceived the robot as less human-like than participants who watched a live HRI, whereas these two groups did not differentiate in regard of perceived realness. Usually, experimental studies interested in HRI and participants' evaluations of humanoid service robots - due to limited resources - need to fall back on video stimuli. This is the first study using participants' evaluations of a humanoid service robot when observed either on a 2D video, in 3D virtual reality, or in real life. "Many people will have their first encounter with a service robot over the next decade. Service robots are designed to communicate with humans in humanlike ways and assist them in various aspects of their daily routine. Potential areas of application range from hospitals and nursing homes to hotels and the users' households," said Schreiner. "To date, however, most people still only know such robots from the Internet or TV and are still skeptical about the idea of sharing their personal lives with robots, especially when it comes to machines of highly human-like appearance." "When R2-D2 Hops off the Screen: A Service Robot Encountered in Real Life Appears More Real and Humanlike Than on Video or in VR," by Constanze Schreiner, Martina Mara, and Markus Appel; to be presented at the 67th Annual International Communication Association Conference, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Contact: To schedule an interview with the author or request a copy of the research, please contact John Paul Gutierrez, jpgutierrez@icahdq.org. The International Communication Association is an academic association for scholars interested in the study, teaching, and application of all aspects of human and mediated communication. With more than 4,300 members in 80 countries, ICA includes 31 Divisions and Interest Groups and publishes the Annals of the International Communication Association and five major, peer-reviewed journals: Journal of Communication, Communication Theory, Human Communication Research, Communication, Culture & Critique, and the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. For more information, visit http://www. .


Most human interactions with robots come from behind a screen. Whether it's fiction or a real-life interaction, rarely are we put face to face with a robot. This poses a significant barrier when we look towards a future where robots will be part of our everyday lives. How do we break down this barrier? A recent study by researchers at the University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Wurzburg, and Arts Electronica Futurelab, found that people who watched live interactions with a robot were more likely to consider the robot to have more human-like qualities. Constanze Schreiner (University of Koblenz-Landau), Martina Mara (Ars Electronica Futuerlab), and Markus Appel (University of Wurzburg) will present their findings at the 67th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in San Diego, CA. Using a Roboy robot, participants observed one of three experimental human robot interactons (HRI); either in real life, in virtual reality (VR) on a 3D screen, or on a 2D screen. The scripted HRI between Roboy and the human technician was 4:25 minutes long. During that time, participants saw Roboy assisting the human in organizing appointments, conducting web searches and finding a birthday present for his mom. The data analyzed revealed that observing a live interaction or alternatively encountering the robot in a VR lead to more perceived realness. Furthermore, the kind of presentation influenced perceived human-likeness. Participants who observed a real HRI reported the highest perceived human-likeness. Particularly interesting is that participants who were introduced to Roboy in VR perceived the robot as less human-like than participants who watched a live HRI, whereas these two groups did not differentiate in regard of perceived realness. Usually, experimental studies interested in HRI and participants' evaluations of humanoid service robots - due to limited resources - need to fall back on video stimuli. This is the first study using participants' evaluations of a humanoid service robot when observed either on a 2D video, in 3D virtual reality, or in real life. "Many people will have their first encounter with a service robot over the next decade. Service robots are designed to communicate with humans in humanlike ways and assist them in various aspects of their daily routine. Potential areas of application range from hospitals and nursing homes to hotels and the users' households," said Schreiner. "To date, however, most people still only know such robots from the Internet or TV and are still skeptical about the idea of sharing their personal lives with robots, especially when it comes to machines of highly human-like appearance." "When R2-D2 Hops off the Screen: A Service Robot Encountered in Real Life Appears More Real and Humanlike Than on Video or in VR," by Constanze Schreiner, Martina Mara, and Markus Appel; to be presented at the 67th Annual International Communication Association Conference, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Explore further: Image: Controlling robots at the Human Robot Interaction Laboratory


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

The Ice Age conjures visions of beasts long gone: the mammoths and mastodons, sharp-fanged sabercats, giant ground sloths, and other beasts that fill the ranks of Earth’s dead zoo. But not every inhabitant of the Ice Age world would have looked strange or unusual to our modern eyes. Consider the cave hyena. Today’s spotted hyenas – Crocuta crocuta – are savanna celebrities. No African safari is complete without hearing their giggles and woops. But in the not-so-distant past, these charismatic carnivores had a subspecies that ranged across Eurasia. This was the cave hyena, Crocuta crocuta spelaea, and paleontologists have recently uncovered the best skeleton of this bone-crusher yet found on the Iberian Peninsula. The partial skeleton was found at Los Aprendices Cave, a 143,000-38,000 year old site in northern Spain. The remains of several other mammals were found at the site, including ibex, rabbit, rodent, and desman, but, as Victor Sauqué and colleagues write on their report of the cave, the hyena bones are most remarkable of all. Despite the fact that cave hyenas were relatively common in Ice Age Europe, their skeletons are considered rare. Their bones were often broken and scattered, sometimes because the living hyenas scavenged the dead. So even though previous research has revealed that the form of this ancient mammal was similar to that of today’s spotted hyena, any new cave hyena skeleton offers a new point of comparison between the present and not-too-distant past. This particular hyena, Sauqué and coauthors write, is represented by 194 bones. That’s not bad at all, with the skull and limbs almost completely represented. And from those bones, the researchers estimated that this individual weighed about 227 pounds – quite a bit heftier than most spotted hyenas alive today. In fact, Sauqué and colleagues write, the cave hyena was “a heavier and more powerful animal” than its living relatives. A stockier build would have made it less skilled as a runner, but better able to drag large portions of carcasses back to dens to consume in relative peace. So was the Los Aprendices hyena just like a bulkier spotted hyena? That’s difficult to say. Ice Age cave hyenas and today’s spotted hyenas were close relatives, with some experts allocating the cave hyenas to a subspecies of spotted hyena. Yet Sauqué and colleagues point out differences in size, jaw anatomy, and possibly behavior that might separate the two forms. Cave hyenas are thought to have been major bone accumulators during the Ice Age whereas today’s spotted hyenas don’t engage in the behavior nearly as often. A recent study on fossil hyena brains, likewise, suggest that the smarts of today’s spotted hyenas was a relatively recent evolutionary event and may have further distinguished today’s populations from the cave hyenas. Regardless of how the systematics shake out, however, Europe’s Ice Age hyenas were undoubtedly impressive beasts, and we can thank them for helping to create a record of Pleistocene life through their leftovers. Sauqué, V., Rabal-Garcés, R., Madurell-Malaperia, J., Gisbert, M., Zamora, S., de Torres, T., Ortiz, J., Cuenca-Bescós, G. 2017. Pleistocene cave hyenas in the Iberian Peninsula: new insights from Los Aprendices cave (Moncayo, Zaragoza). Palaeontogia Electronica. 20.1.11A: 1-38


News Article | November 9, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

MUNICH, GERMANY--(Marketwired - Nov 9, 2016) - Electronica -- Ethertronics, the leader in ultra-high performance smart antenna system solutions, today announced two new Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) smart antennas to enhance connected car antenna performance, reliability and range at Electronica, November 8-11 in Munich, Germany. The company is working with leading manufacturers to showcase new V2X active steering and high gain antennas at the Ethertronics exhibit, located in Hall A4, booth 551. "Leading automotive manufacturers continue to turn to Ethertronics to help navigate and solve today's wireless connectivity complexities in connected cars," said Olivier Pajona, chief scientist for Ethertronics. "Ethertronics' integration of antenna architecture, RF and algorithms creates industry leading antenna system performance for difficult in-care automotive wireless connectivity applications. Within always more crowdy RF environments, our evolving active steering antenna technologies provide unmatched V2X wireless performance solving today's demanding automotive wireless connectivity challenges." Adding connectivity, awareness and intelligence to vehicles is helping to define an entirely new landscape for V2X communication, convenience, infotainment, and safety that we are proud to be a part of. Ethertronics has provided antenna in-car connectivity system solutions for over 15 years. Our integrated smart antenna, active steering technology is the latest example of how the automobile has begun a fundamental shift away from passive antennas, which struggle to support LTE's fragmented bands, carrier aggregation and MIMO, as well as the trend toward thinner, sleeker car antennas. Given its ability to deliver major spectral efficiency gains as well as a host of other important in-car benefits -- from better connectivity and stronger interference immunity to increased download speeds, and an improved connected car user experience, Active Steering is a game changer disrupting the status quo. Ethertronics will showcase its new Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) smart antennas at Electronica, including: Availability Ethertronics new V2X smart antennas will be demonstrated at Electronica in Munich, November 8-11, 2016 at Ethertronics booth A4.551. For additional product information, please contact sales@ethertronics.com. About Ethertronics Ethertronics is a global leader and innovator in ultra-high performance smart antenna system solutions for wireless communications. Ethertronics' Active Steering platform establishes benchmarks for speed, range, efficiency and reliability across a range of applications, from mobile phones to Wi-Fi and the Internet of Things. Ethertronics has shipped over 1.4 billion antenna systems that are being used by leading wireless handset and device manufacturers worldwide. www.ethertronics.com


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

CHANDLER, Ariz., Nov. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- (Electronica) — Microchip Technology Inc. (NASDAQ: MCHP), a leading provider of microcontroller (MCU), mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, today released a new generation of 8-bit tinyAVR MCUs. The four new devices range from 14 to 24...


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

This report studies Mechanical Locks in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with capacity, production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Mechanical Locks in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Mechanical Locks in each application, can be divided into Global Mechanical Locks Market Research Report 2017 1 Mechanical Locks Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Mechanical Locks 1.2 Mechanical Locks Segment by Type 1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Mechanical Locks by Type in 2015 1.2.2 Grade Level 1 Mechanical Locks 1.2.3 Grade Level 2 Mechanical Locks 1.2.4 Grade Level 3 Mechanical Locks 1.3 Mechanical Locks Segment by Application 1.3.1 Mechanical Locks Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 1.3.2 Doors 1.3.3 Furniture 1.3.4 Suitcase 1.3.5 External Facility 1.3.6 Bicycles 1.4 Mechanical Locks Market by Region 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Mechanical Locks (2012-2022) 2 Global Mechanical Locks Market Competition by Manufacturers 2.1 Global Mechanical Locks Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.2 Global Mechanical Locks Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.3 Global Mechanical Locks Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.4 Manufacturers Mechanical Locks Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type 2.5 Mechanical Locks Market Competitive Situation and Trends 2.5.1 Mechanical Locks Market Concentration Rate 2.5.2 Mechanical Locks Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers 2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 7 Global Mechanical Locks Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 Serrature Meroni 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Product A 7.1.2.2 Product B 7.1.3 Serrature Meroni Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 ECO Schulte 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Product A 7.2.2.2 Product B 7.2.3 ECO Schulte Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 ASSA ABLOY 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Product A 7.3.2.2 Product B 7.3.3 ASSA ABLOY Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Fermax Electronica 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Product A 7.4.2.2 Product B 7.4.3 Fermax Electronica Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 Mul-T-Lock 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Product A 7.5.2.2 Product B 7.5.3 Mul-T-Lock Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Nuova Oxidal 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Product A 7.6.2.2 Product B 7.6.3 Nuova Oxidal Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 AGB - Alban Giacomo 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Product A 7.7.2.2 Product B 7.7.3 AGB - Alban Giacomo Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Illinois Lock Company 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Product A 7.8.2.2 Product B 7.8.3 Illinois Lock Company Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 Codelocks 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Product A 7.9.2.2 Product B 7.9.3 Codelocks Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 Frosio Bortolo 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.10.2 Mechanical Locks Product Type, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Product A 7.10.2.2 Product B 7.10.3 Frosio Bortolo Mechanical Locks Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.11 Picard-serrures 7.12 SAB Serrature 7.13 Dom Sicherheitstechnik 7.14 Gardesa 7.15 HEWI Heinrich Wilke 7.16 ITEC 7.17 GSF Glass Fixing System 7.18 Galbusera G.&G. 7.19 Omnia Industries 7.20 Utensil Legno 7.21 Ozone Overseas 7.22 Metalglas 7.23 JADO 7.24 Kaba Group For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Smith, a global distributor of electronic components and semiconductors, today announces its upcoming exhibition at Electronica China 2017 in Shanghai. The company, which has recently expanded its European and Asian footprints and closed its highest-earning year of all time, now brings that momentum to this premier industry gathering. Smith representatives will be available in booth 5572 to demonstrate the company’s procurement capabilities and the solutions for customized supply chain and inventory management Smith offers partners in the thriving Asian marketplace and worldwide. “Electronica is one of the main events that draws people and companies from all over the global electronics industry to share their expertise and capabilities,” said Margo Evans, Smith’s Vice President of Marketing. “Electronica China is an especially vital gathering because Asia’s thriving market is only going to continue growing, evolving, and demanding new and innovative solutions to succeed in it.” Smith’s own recent growth highlights the company’s ability to support customers in Asia and beyond, with fifteen offices across three continents offering localized service nearly anywhere in the world. Smith’s recent Hong Kong warehouse expansion, specifically, has broadened the logistical and service capabilities available to customers in this region, and Smith continues to explore new solutions for customers’ unique needs. “From quality assurance and procurement to our expansive service portfolio, Smith is primed to support customers in the Asia-Pacific market,” said Choon Byun, Smith’s president of the company’s APAC region. “We are excited to demonstrate this at Electronica China.” WHAT: Electronica China 2017 WHEN: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 – Thursday, March 16, 2017 WHERE: Smith Exhibition Showcase Hall E5, Booth 5572 Shanghai New International Expo Centre China, 上海市浦东新区龙阳路2345号 No. 2345 Longyang Road, Pudong New Area, Shanghai 201204, China The International Trade Fair for Electronic, Systems and Applications (Electronica China) is the leading trade platform for electronic components and systems in China, as well as the Asian-Pacific region. Its growth in the last decade has established a name for Electronica China’s "high-end applications and technological innovations.” A series of international innovation forums addressing important application trends and growth markets offer the electronics community in China the latest industry trends and solutions. Founded in 1984, Smith sources, manages, and distributes the electronic components that go into everything from mobile phones and computers to appliances and directional drilling systems. In 15 cities around the world, from Silicon Valley to Seoul, Smith’s 500 employees communicate in 36 different languages and buy and sell components 24 hours per day. Smith is always moving: helping manufacturers navigate market shifts; customizing supply chain solutions; testing components using cutting-edge technology. With testing and logistics hubs in Houston, Hong Kong, and Amsterdam, Smith’s processes focus on critical issues, from quality management to counterfeit prevention and environmental safety. Smith’s operations, purchasing, and sales worldwide are seamlessly integrated with the company’s global IT infrastructure, Saleschain™, offering real-time inventory and logistics visibility anywhere in the world. Smith is the leading independent distributor of electronic components and ranks number 13 among all global distributors. Smith’s Intelligent Distribution™ model adapts to ever-changing demands by providing seamless global electronics sourcing and logistics, regardless of distribution channel or locale. For more information, please visit http://www.smithweb.com, or, to reach a Smith representative 24 hours a day, please call +1 713.430.3000. For more information, contact: Margo Evans Smith, VP of Marketing +1 713.430.3966 mevans(at)nfsmith(dot)com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Tyrannosaurus rex is the ultimate in Mesozoic clickbait. You could even say that the dinosaur's a real tyrant, casting a large shadow over the hundreds of other dinosaurs that could benefit from some time in the spotlight. So even though paleontologist Stephan Lautenschlager included T. rex in his recent study on dinosaur bites, I don’t want to talk about the tyrant lizard king much. I want to focus on a different lizard. Long time readers know that I have a soft spot for Allosaurus. The 150 million year old dinosaur was the top carnivore of the Late Jurassic, reaching sizes to rival that of the later T. rex and was much more common than its toothy neighbors Ceratosaurus and Torvosaurus. And as estimated by Lautenschlager, Allosaurus also had one of the most impressive bites of all time. Working from virtual models of Tyrannosaurus, Allosaurus, and the herbivorous theropod Erlikosaurus fitted with digital jaw muscles based on the anatomy of buzzards and alligators, Lautenschlager estimated the optimal and maximum gapes for the three dinosaurs. Contrary to what you might expect from the hordes of cgi dinosaurs that stomp across basic cable science channels, these dinosaurs were able to deliver their best bites when their jaws were open about 28 degrees, not flung to their maximum extent. (Erlikosaurus, which was more on the vegetarian side of the spectrum, had an optimal gape of about 20.5 degrees.) When it came to just how wide the dinosaurs could drop their jaws without tearing up their own jaw muscles, though, Lautenschlager found that Allosaurus significantly surpassed ol’ T. rex. While Tyrannosaurus could open its mouth an impressive 63.5 degrees, the maximum Allosaurus gape came out to 79 degrees. The figures of Lautenschlager’s yawning dinosaurs reminded me of an idea Bob Bakker put forward in the late 90’s. Allosaurus, in Bakker’s view, was the dinosaurian equivalent of a saber-toothed cat, using a wide gape and strong neck muscles to slash at prey rather than deliver a devastating chomp like T. rex. While the paper was more qualitative and speculative than Lautenschlager’s work, Bakker was nonetheless right that Allosaurus was capable of an astonishingly wide gape. But why? That’s a little more difficult to suss out, especially since it’s easy to be misled by our love of extreme dinosaur traits and habits. First off, most of the recent work on Allosaurus feeding has focused on a particular specimen and species. That’s MOR 693 – Big Al to you and me – and while it’s often called Allosaurus fragilis in papers, the dinosaur is actually an older, more slender-skulled species whose official name has yet to be published. This is important because, as Mark Loewen showed in his dissertation on the carnivore, the skull of true Allosaurus fragilis flared out more towards the back, giving them more space for powerful jaw muscles. How this would have affected bite performance hasn’t been given the same attention Big Al has enjoyed. It’s also worth noting that Allosaurus might have had multiple killing techniques. Maximum gape and optimal gape, as Lautenschlager found, are not the same. Exceptionally wide bites would have actually been weaker than those when the dinosaur held its jaws at optimal tension. In short, Allosaurus would have delivered its best bites with a smaller gape. (And the same would have been true for Tyrannosaurus, which could throw open its jaws impressively wide, too.) Why the dinosaurs was able to really open wide, then, might support something Bakker previously suggested. If Allosaurus really did attack with a wide gape, the dinosaur could have used its strong neck muscles to drive its toothy upper jaw at prey like some kind of biological “war club.” More of a slash than a bite. So why was Allosaurus capable such an unusual bite? Could it be true that Allosaurus was capable of such wide gapes because they were going after larger prey? That was Bakker’s contention. The big gape made Allosaurus a specialized “brontosaur killer” capable of taking down the surplus of giant sauropods that plodded around the floodplains of the Jurassic west. As dramatic as such visions are, though, there are a few problems with envisioning Allosaurus jumping onto the back of an adult Diplodocus and slicing out massive chunks of flesh. Even if Allosaurus really did slice at sauropod hides in the way Bakker and others have suggested, though, taking down a full-grown sauropod would have been no simple task. Sauropod necks, for example, were not noodles just begging to be bitten through, but, as Mike Taylor and colleagues recently pointed out, were “constructed from tough elements including the often robust cervical ribs, bony laminae, ligaments, and tendons.” Decapitation is never as easy as the movies make it look. And while “Clash of the Titans” dominates paleoimagery, such confrontations were probably rare. Like many modern carnivores, Dave Hone and Oliver Rauhut wrote, carnivorous dinosaurs likely targeted hatchlings and juveniles. (And this might explain why finding baby dinosaurs is so difficult!) Not to mention that Bakker’s chosen analogues for Allosaurus – the sabercats – didn’t target the biggest prey on the landscape. Geochemical signatures in bones pulled from the La Brea asphalt seeps indicate Smilodon pursued bison and camels, not giant sloths or mammoths, and, in a recent review of Ice Age ecosystems, Blaire Van Valkenburgh and colleagues found that large herbivores are vulnerable to carnivores when they’re juveniles. A Homotherium den in Texas littered with the bones of young mastodons attests to the fact that these sabercats typically targeted juvenile giants rather than risking injury and death under the feet of the adults. The same was probably true for Allosaurus, especially since sauropod dinosaurs laid multiple eggs at a time and the landscape may have been flooded with naive young dinosaurs when hatching season rolled around. So we’re left with the perpetual paleontological problem of what an animal could have done and what it actually did. Perhaps Allosaurus both bit at its prey and swung its skull like a tooth-studded hatchet, making it a more versatile predator and perhaps explaining why it’s apparently so much more common in Morrison Formation rocks than any of its competitors. And that makes me feel sorry for the baby sauropods that walked into the fern-covered floodplains and conifer stands of the Late Jurassic world. Imagine hearing the snap of a twig, turning at the sound to see the sky blocked out by a set of serrated teeth swinging down on you from above. Coltrain, J., Harris, J., Cerling, T., Ehleringer, J., Dearing, M., Ward, J., Allen, J. 2004. Rancho La Brea stable isotope biogeochemistry and its implications for the palaeoecology of late Pleistocene, coastal southern California. Palaeo. doi: 10.1016/j.palaeo.2003.12.008 Loewen, M. 2009. Variation in the Late Jurassic theropod dinosaur Allosaurus: ontogenetic, functional, and taxonomic implications. University of Utah dissertation. Snively, E., Cotton, J., Ridgely, R., Witmer, L. 2013. Multibody dynamics model of head and neck function in Allosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda). Palaeontologia Electronica. 16 (2): 1-29 Taylor, M., Hone, D., Wedel, M., Naish. 2011. The long necks of sauropods did not evolve primarily through sexual selection. Journal of Zoology. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-7998.2011.00824.x Van Valkenburgh, B., Hayward, M., Ripple, W., Meloro, C., Roth, V. 2015. The impact of large terrestrial carnivores on Pleistocene ecosystems. PNAS. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1502554112 [This post was originally published at National Geographic.]


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.prlog.org

AverLogic introduces AL462, its revolutionary 4K2K Video FIFO memory for UHD Video Applications, and, AL362, its new developed 4K UHD Video Processor for Quad View, Multiple Display and TV Wall, during the next Electronica Trade Show in Munich.


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Indie artist Moon Chylde leveraged Bobby D’s Indie Music Week to do a world wide exclusive release of her brand new single “Fantasy Suite” from her upcoming NEW CD “Fantasy Suite” on February 6, 2017. To view the clip of the release on Bobby D Live, please go to https://youtu.be/KqB92xjB_6E Last December Bobby D announced that 2017 was his comeback year for webcasting after a 4 year sabbatical but this time instead of going live from Costa Rica, as he did for a decade, his new webcasts will be LIVE from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Today, he’s officially announcing the date and time of his new formatted shows that focus on connecting entrepreneurs and music artists to a passionate and loyal audience.Bobby D’s 2 hour HD webcasts will air every Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m.North American Eastern time starting June 3rd, 2017via http://www.bobbydlive.com As a pre-launch strategy Bobby D recently initiated a daily LIVE Facebook stream to showcase quality entrepreneurs and talented indie music artists. The audience can tune in Monday to Friday to his 10 minute LIVE streams via http://www.bobbydlive.com with HD video archives accessible on demand. In a statement, Bobby D explained; “The purpose of Bobby D Facebook Live is to promote and make connection with entrepreneurs, indie music artists and to begin building a loyal following. In essence what we are building here is a Global community of passionate people who love supporting each other. The Bobby D Facebook LIVE also allows us to test new live streaming technologies.” Additionally a significant marketing feature was added to the Bobby D Facebook LIVE. The very first first Indie Music Week took place on February 6 to the 10th. This novel marketing approach was well received by the artists and music lovers. Several artists leveraged Bobby D Facebook Live to premier and showcase their new singles as a promotional strategy to create awareness for their upcoming new CDs. In a statement, Moon Chylde explained: “I was very excited to have chosen Indie Music Week with host, Bobby D, for an exclusive world premiere of my new single “FANTASY SUITE “. I absolutely love the energy Bobby brings to his show. He has been a true supporter of Indie Artists for quite some time. The platform Indie Music Week provides an amazing opportunity for so many and reaches out to so many as well. It has always been a pleasure to work with Bobby and I am more than pleased with my decision to place my world premiere into his hands.” To find out more about the artisit, please visit http://www.themoonchylde.com Because of the resounding success of the first Indie Music Week (IMW) initiative, Bobby D has made an irrevocable commitment to continue featuring indie music artists the very first full week of every month. The next IMW is scheduled for March 6th to the 10th. Indie Music artists in the music genres of Contemporary Jazz, Funky Jazz,Funk, Soul, R&B, Electronica, Dance, New Age, World, Hip hop/Rap (with clean lyrics) are encouraged to submit their music in mp3 format via info@bobbydlive.com (along with song credits and the song/or cd art work) The best artists and the best music will be featured at absolutely no costs to all participating artists. Official site and to view the Facebook LIVE Monday thorugh Friday at 12:00pm Eastern, go to http://www.bobbydlive.com For more information, please visit http://www.bobbydlive.com

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