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Yamamoto T.,Drive Systems Laboratory | Hasegawa H.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Furuya T.,Drive Systems Laboratory | Ogawa K.,Drive Systems Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2010

Fuel cells are currently receiving attention for their potential to clean and highly efficient power-supply systems. The authors have been developing a new type of fuel cellpowered railway vehicle to replace conventional diesel vehicles in non-electrified sections. In this work, a hybrid system using fuel cells and batteries was installed on test vehicles, which were then subjected to running tests on a test track. This paper describes the development of fuel cells and batteries hybrid test vehicles and the evaluation of this hybrid system's energy efficiency and fuel consumption rate. Source


Sakamoto Y.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Kashiwagi T.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Yoneyama T.,Drive Systems Laboratory | Saga S.-I.,Drive Systems Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2014

Studies have been carried out on a rail brake developed by applying a linear induction motor technology, called LIM-type rail brake. This brake is capable of generating braking forces without contact. In addition, this method decreases the rise in rail temperature, and on-board supply of electric power is not required by using dynamic braking. It is however necessary to install this brake in the limited space between front and rear wheels of the bogie. A prototype rail brake system was designed and built and its electromagnetic characteristics were examined on a test track in RTRI. These investigations revealed that the LIM-type rail brake could be applicable for practical use. Source


Nakagawa C.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Watanabe K.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Suzuki E.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2010

To develop a more suitable method of evaluating the ride comfort of railway vehicles, including high-speed trains, a fundamental study was conducted on passenger sensitivity to various frequencies of vibration with respect to ride comfort. Experiments were performed on 54 subjects using an electrodynamic vibration system that can generate vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 80 Hz in the vertical and lateral directions. The results of the experiments indicated that the subjects tended to experience greater discomfort when exposed to high-frequency vibrations than presumed by Japan's conventional Ride Comfort Level assessment method. Source


Sakamoto Y.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Kashiwagi T.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Hasegawa H.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Sasakawa T.,Administration Division | Karino Y.,Brake Control Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2012

Studies have been carried out on a rail brake applying linear induction motor technology, called LIM-type rail brake. This brake is capable of generating braking forces without contact. In addition, this method decreases the rise in rail temperature, and no onboard supply is required by using dynamic braking. It is necessary however to install this brake between front and rear wheels of the bogie. A prototype rail brake system was designed and built and its electromagnetic characteristics were examined on a test bench with a roller rig. These investigations revealed that the LIM-type rail brake could be applicable for practical use. Source


Hoshino H.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Suzuki E.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Yonezu T.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Watanabe K.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2012

This paper focuses on the vehicle dynamics of superconducting magnetically levitated (Maglev) vehicles as a train set, and reports results of computer simulation as well as results of experiments using a reduced-scale Maglev model vehicle dynamics experiment apparatus (MAGMOX). The previously constructed MAGMOX consisting of a single car was expanded to form a train set comprising several cars. The computer simulations and MAGMOX experiments produced results that demonstrated their effectiveness in reproducing testing conditions of the full-scale Maglev system that are difficult to achieve on an actual full-scale vehicle due to vehicle structure constraints and rigging space. Source

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