Entity

Time filter

Source Type

United States

Cemenska J.,Electroimpact Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2011

Electroimpact Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) machines lay-up composite parts by accurately placing carbon fiber tow (strips of impregnated carbon fiber) on a mould. In order to achieve high accuracy at high speeds, the processes of feeding and cutting tows must be tuned. Historically, the tuning has been a time-consuming, manual process. This paper will present a methodology to replace manual measurements with an automated laser, improve measurement speed by an order of magnitude, improve accuracy from +/- 0.020 (manual) to +/- 0.015 (laser), and eliminate human error. Copyright © 2011 SAE International. Source


Devlieg R.,Electroimpact Inc.
SAE International Journal of Aerospace | Year: 2010

Serial link articulated robots applied in aerospace assembly have largely been limited in scope by deficiencies in positional accuracy. The majority of aerospace applications require tolerances of +/−0.25mm or less which have historically been far beyond reach of the conventional offthe-shelf robot. The recent development of the accurate robot technology represents a paradigm shift for the use of articulated robotics in airframe assembly. With the addition of secondary feedback, high-order kinematic model, and a fully integrated conventional CNC control, robotic technology can now compete on a performance level with customized high precision motion platforms. As a result, the articulated arm can be applied to a much broader range of assembly applications that were once limited to custom machines, including one-up assembly, two-sided drilling and fastening, material removal, and automated fiber placement. © 2010 SAE International. Source


Jeffries K.A.,Electroimpact Inc.
SAE International Journal of Aerospace | Year: 2013

The process of robotic automated fiber placement has been enhanced by combining the technologies of an accurate articulated robotic system with a modular Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) head. The accurate robotic system is comprised of an off-the-shelf 6-axis KUKA Titan KR1000L750 riding on a linear axis with an option for an additional part rotator axis. Each of the robot axes is enhanced with secondary position encoders. The modular fiber placement head features a robotic tool changer which allows quick-change of the process heads and an onboard creel. The quick-change fiber placement head and simplified tow path yields terrific process reliability and flexibility while allowing head preparations to occur offline. The system is controlled by a Siemens 840Dsl CNC which handles all process functions, robot motion, and executes software technologies developed by Electroimpact for superior positional accuracy including enhanced kinematics utilizing a high-order kinematic model. Part programming and simulation are performed offline using CGTech VERICUT Composite Programming and VERICUT Composite Simulation. This combination of technologies results in a system that has high path accuracy and process flexibility at a lower cost than traditional fiber placement machines. Copyright © 2013 SAE International. Source


Devlieg R.,Electroimpact Inc.
SAE International Journal of Aerospace | Year: 2011

The processes of drilling and milling Boeing 737 inboard flaps at Triumph Aerostructures have been enhanced by an accurate articulated robotic system. Tool point positioning is handled by an off-the-shelf 6-axis KUKA KR360 robot riding on a linear axis. Each of the 7 axes is enhanced with secondary position encoders. A single process head performs all required functions, including one-sided pressure application, touch probing, barcode scanning, drilling/countersinking, measurement of hole diameter and countersink depth, and face milling. The system is controlled by a Siemens 840Dsl CNC which handles all process functions, robot motion, and executes software technologies developed for superior positional accuracy including enhanced kinematics, automated normality correction, and anti-skid correction. The layout of the assembly cell allows the robot to span four fixture zones. Part programs are generated offline in the Catia environment using an offline programming and simulation package. © 2011 SAE International. Source


The system includes a collar feed assembly which includes a channel within a step assembly at the end thereof, which defines a receiving cavity for the collar. The receiving cavity is configured so that the collar can move slightly therein, permitting a die portion of a die tool to engage a center opening of the collar, so that the collar can come into accurate alignment with the center axis of the die tool. The die tool is mounted to be movable slightly transversely to permit a reliable transfer of the collar onto the bolt. The collar is more compliant than the die tool during loading of the collar onto the die pin and the die tool is more compliant than the collar during transfer of the collar from the die pin onto the bolt.

Discover hidden collaborations