Electroimpact Inc.

United States

Electroimpact Inc.

United States
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NEW YORK, May 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Aerospace Robotics Market by Type (Articulated, Cartesian, Cylindrical, Spherical, SCARA, and Parallel), Technology (Traditional, Collaborative), Application (Drilling, Welding, Painting, Inspection) - Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2014-2022 Read the full report: http://www.reportlinker.com/p04883730/Aerospace-Robotics-Market-Global-Opportunity-Analysis-and-Industry-Forecast.html Aerospace robotics market refers to the robotic technology used in aerospace industry for the manufacturing of aircrafts. The aerospace robots are used for various applications including fabrication of aircraft engines, drilling holes, welding metal parts, and painting airframes. Various advantageous features of aerospace robotics technology such as high degree of precision, flexible automation, ability to perform repeatable tasks, and high speed production play a vital role in the construction of aircrafts. The global aerospace robotics market has witnessed rapid growth in the recent years, owing to increasing need for the efficient manufacturing of aircrafts. In addition, growing use of robotics to handle aircraft order backlog and increasing labor cost contribute to the market growth. However, lack of skilled workforce and high initial cost hamper the market growth. High paced growth in aerospace industry and technological advancements such as Internet of Things (IoT), 3D vision technology, artificial intelligence, and cloud computing are expected to create numerous opportunities for the market in the near future. The global aerospace robotics market is segmented on the basis of type, technology, application, and geography. Based on type, the aerospace robotics industry is divided into articulated, cartesian, and others (cylindrical, spherical, SCARA, and parallel). Based on technology, the market is further categorized into traditional and collaborative. The market is segmented on the basis of application as drilling, welding, painting, inspection, others (cutting, assembly automation, and material handling). The market is analyzed based on four regions, which include North America (U.S., Mexico, and Canada), Europe (UK, Germany, France, and Rest of Europe), Asia-Pacific (China, India, Japan, and Rest of Asia-Pacific), and LAMEA (Latin America, Middle East, and Africa). The key players profiled in the report are ABB Group, KUKA AG, Fanuc Corporation, Yaskawa Electric Corporation, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, JH Robotics, Inc., Oliver Crispin Robotics Limited, Electroimpact Inc., Universal Robots A/S, AV&R Vision & Robotics Inc. In addition, the key business strategies adopted by these players have been analyzed in the report to gain competitive insights into the market KEY BENEFITS FOR STAKEHOLDERS The study provides an in-depth analysis of the aerospace robotics market along with current and future trends to elucidate the imminent investment pockets. Information regarding key drivers, restraints, and opportunities along with their impact analysis on the aerospace robotics industry is discussed. Porter's Five Forces analysis of the global aerospace robotics industry illustrates the potency of buyers and suppliers participating in the aerospace robotics market. The quantitative analysis of the market from 2014 to 2022 is provided to elaborate the potential of aerospace robotics industry. The market shares and key strategies of market players in the aerospace robotics market has been comprehensively analyzed in the report. Aerospace Robotics Market Key Segments The aerospace robotics market is segmented based on type, technology, application, and geography. BY TYPE Articulated Cartesian Others (Cylindrical, Spherical, SCARA, and Parallel) BY TECHNOLOGY Traditional Collaborative BY APPLICATION Drilling Welding Painting Inspection Others (Cutting, Assembly Automation, and Material Handling) BY GEOGRAPHY North America U.S. Canada Mexico Europe U.K. Germany France Rest of Europe Asia-Pacific China Japan India Rest of Asia-Pacific LAMEA Latin America Middle East Read the full report: http://www.reportlinker.com/p04883730/Aerospace-Robotics-Market-Global-Opportunity-Analysis-and-Industry-Forecast.html About Reportlinker ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need - instantly, in one place. http://www.reportlinker.com __________________________ Contact Clare: clare@reportlinker.com US: (339)-368-6001 Intl: +1 339-368-6001 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/aerospace-robotics-market---global-opportunity-analysis-and-industry-forecast-2014-2022-300452009.html


Haldimann R.,Electroimpact Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2016

Inspection of fasteners prior to installation is critical to the quality of aerospace parts. Fasteners must be inspected for length/grip and diameter at a minimum. Inspecting the fasteners mechanically just prior to insertion can cause additional cycle time loss if inspection cannot be performed at the same time as other operations. To decrease fastener inspection times and to ensure fastener cartridges contain the expected fastener a system was devised to measure the fastener as it travels down the fastener feed tube. This process could be adapted to inspection of fasteners being fed to the process head of a running machine eliminating the mechanical inspection requirement and thus decreasing cycle time. Copyright © 2016 SAE International.


Cemenska J.,Electroimpact Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2011

Electroimpact Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) machines lay-up composite parts by accurately placing carbon fiber tow (strips of impregnated carbon fiber) on a mould. In order to achieve high accuracy at high speeds, the processes of feeding and cutting tows must be tuned. Historically, the tuning has been a time-consuming, manual process. This paper will present a methodology to replace manual measurements with an automated laser, improve measurement speed by an order of magnitude, improve accuracy from +/- 0.020 (manual) to +/- 0.015 (laser), and eliminate human error. Copyright © 2011 SAE International.


Jeffries K.A.,Electroimpact Inc.
SAE International Journal of Aerospace | Year: 2013

The process of robotic automated fiber placement has been enhanced by combining the technologies of an accurate articulated robotic system with a modular Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) head. The accurate robotic system is comprised of an off-the-shelf 6-axis KUKA Titan KR1000L750 riding on a linear axis with an option for an additional part rotator axis. Each of the robot axes is enhanced with secondary position encoders. The modular fiber placement head features a robotic tool changer which allows quick-change of the process heads and an onboard creel. The quick-change fiber placement head and simplified tow path yields terrific process reliability and flexibility while allowing head preparations to occur offline. The system is controlled by a Siemens 840Dsl CNC which handles all process functions, robot motion, and executes software technologies developed by Electroimpact for superior positional accuracy including enhanced kinematics utilizing a high-order kinematic model. Part programming and simulation are performed offline using CGTech VERICUT Composite Programming and VERICUT Composite Simulation. This combination of technologies results in a system that has high path accuracy and process flexibility at a lower cost than traditional fiber placement machines. Copyright © 2013 SAE International.


Patent
Electroimpact Inc. | Date: 2012-12-28

A machine includes a feed system for moving fasteners to a track-type fastener injector system and a pusher for moving the fasteners along the track. A rivet ejector assembly comprises a pair of bombay-type doors which support a portion of the track feed system and a mechanism for recognizing misfed rivets as they approach the bombay doors. The bombay doors are rotated about their longitudinal axes so that opposing inner surfaces of the bombay doors pivot away from each other, along with the track portion, permitting the fastener to fall or be blown therethrough, ejected from the injector system.


Patent
Electroimpact Inc. | Date: 2014-09-19

The system includes a ram assembly with fingers for grasping a fastener. An actuator moves the ram assembly toward the workpiece, under machine control. A housing member which is movable by the actuator includes a holding member for an anvil portion of the ram assembly, the holding member being movable within the housing member. The holding member and the housing member are arranged so there is a selected air gap between the movable member and the top of the housing at the start of the fastener cycle. An insertion sensor assembly changes signal state when the air gap begins to close. When the air gap begins to close either too early or too late relative to a properly positioned fastener, the actuator is stopped by the cycle motion controller.


The system includes a moving feed assembly through which a collar is moved by compressed air to a position in substantial alignment with the centerline of a swaging die assembly. Two spring-loaded fingers are mounted on opposing sides of the feed assembly for receiving the collar by compressed air action where it is maintained in substantial alignment with the swaging die assembly. The spring action of the fingers is strong enough that the collar can be pressed firmly against a curved receiving portion of the fingers by the compressed air. A die pin portion of the swaging die is then inserted into the collar, thereafter maintaining the position of the collar as the feed assembly with the opposing fingers are stripped away from the collar, leaving the die pin-engaged collar free to be moved by action of a ram assembly to a stackup of parts to be fastened, where the collar can be transferred onto a bolt which extends through the stackup.


The injector assembly receives fasteners such as bolts used in the manufacture of composite aircraft wing structures, at a high speed from a supply thereof, such as a cartridge. The injector assembly includes a post assembly which includes a hollow post housing having a post mass and a mass stop pin positioned within the housing. The bolt moves through a feed tube assembly, a muzzle member and into a chamber portion of the injector assembly. A urethane contact member is positioned at a forward end of the mass. A source of compressed air moves the mass and the contact member into a position slightly past the rear end of the housing and into a chamber portion of the injector assembly. When the bolt contacts the contact member at high speed, the mass is moved back toward a base portion of the post assembly. The mass is sufficient to dissipate the kinetic energy of the moving bolt without damage thereto.


The system includes a collar feed assembly which includes a channel within a step assembly at the end thereof, which defines a receiving cavity for the collar. The receiving cavity is configured so that the collar can move slightly therein, permitting a die portion of a die tool to engage a center opening of the collar, so that the collar can come into accurate alignment with the center axis of the die tool. The die tool is mounted to be movable slightly transversely to permit a reliable transfer of the collar onto the bolt. The collar is more compliant than the die tool during loading of the collar onto the die pin and the die tool is more compliant than the collar during transfer of the collar from the die pin onto the bolt.


The system includes a moving feed assembly through which a collar is moved by compressed air to a position in substantial alignment with the centerline of a swaging die assembly. Two spring-loaded fingers are mounted on opposing sides of the feed assembly for receiving the collar by compressed air action where it is maintained in substantial alignment with the swaging die assembly. The spring action of the fingers is strong enough that the collar can be pressed firmly against a curved receiving portion of the fingers by the compressed air. A die pin portion of the swaging die is then inserted into the collar, thereafter maintaining the position of the collar as the feed assembly with the opposing fingers are stripped away from the collar, leaving the die pin-engaged collar free to be moved by action of a ram assembly to a stackup of parts to be fastened, where the collar can be transferred onto a bolt which extends through the stackup.

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