ELAN GmbH

Hamburg, Germany

ELAN GmbH

Hamburg, Germany

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News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Science shows that human language and communication cannot be studied solely by analysing speech. Among the contributions made by this work, Asier Romero, the researcher in the Department of Language and Literature Didactics of the University College of Teacher Training in Bilbao, highlights the fact that this is "the first study" conducted on children whose mother tongue is Basque and which shows "how and when" babies develop and use "a pattern to coordinate gestures with speech". "We have discovered that when a baby abandons the characteristic babbling for vocalizations of repeated, long chains of syllables at 9 months and starts the more complex pre-language phase around 11 months, his/her gestures begin to be produced mainly in combination with vocal production rather than as an act of gestures alone. In other words, the gestural and speech system are already closely related", explained Romero. The researcher was also keen to stress that the typology of the gestures in these gesture and vocalization combinations are "mainly deictic"; in other words, they display "a declarative intention and involve implementation gestures, such as pointing, giving, showing, offering and making requests in order to direct the attention of an adult towards the object that the baby is interested in obtaining, in other words, to inform the adult about his/her interest in the object". As far as Romero is concerned, this study shows that speech and gestures are two "essential elements" when studying human communication because there is more and more evidence that both are closely coordinated, and "it is perhaps a fundamental condition for the subsequent development of early vocabulary during the language phase". With the potential to help to predict language alterations In fact, as the researcher pointed out, "there is more and more scientific evidence" that shows that the combination of babbling and gestures of babies "are related" to the subsequent development of language and therefore constitute an element for prediction purposes. "That is why research of this type could help to predict language alterations in specific language disorder," said the researcher. The aim of this pioneering work was to explore the process of language acquisition and development in relation to the time-related coordination of gestures and speech in children. To do this, the researchers recorded on video two babies born into Basque-speaking families from the moment they turned 9 months and until they reached the age 13 months. "The recordings were made in their homes in the company of their parents. A total of over 1,260 speech acts were obtained; they were produced by each baby across about 6 hours' worth of recordings which were later analysed by applying specific ELAN software. "This tool allows one to make and process annotations in digital lines of information in a joint way for a range of audio and video files," he explained. This pioneering publication by researchers in the EUDIA Research Group of the College of Teacher Training in Bilbao has opened up fresh lines of work, and in other cases confirms what has already emerged in different pieces of research on Catalan and English babies. On this point it is interesting to draw attention to the continuity that the research will have with the PhD thesis being developed and funded by a pre-doctoral research grant from the UPV/EHU. The author is Irati de Pablo and it is entitled 'Keinuen eta bokalizazioaren arteko harremanak bizitzaren lehen urtean: ebidentziak euskara hizkuntzatik' (Interrelations between gestures and vocalizations during the first year of life: evidence from the Basque language) and with another set of studies currently being conducted by this research group and which "are open and at the analysis and interpretation stage". Romero Andonegi, A., Etxebarria Lejarreta, A., De Pablo Delgado, I. y Romero Andonegi, A. (2017): "The interrelation of gestures and vocalization in early communication functions: Evidence from Basque language". Signos. Estudios de Lingüística, 50(93), 96-123.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Glowing nebula found at the heart of a huge "rotocluster' of early galaxies appears to be part of the cosmic web of filaments connecting galaxies, but what's lighting it up? Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an "enormous Lyman-alpha nebula" (ELAN), it is the brightest and among the largest of these rare objects, only a handful of which have been observed. ELANs are huge blobs of gas surrounding and extending between galaxies in the intergalactic medium. They are thought to be parts of the network of filaments connecting galaxies in a vast cosmic web. Previously discovered ELANs are likely illuminated by the intense radiation from quasars, but it's not clear what is causing the hydrogen gas in the newly discovered nebula to emit Lyman-alpha radiation (a characteristic wavelength of light absorbed and emitted by hydrogen atoms). The newly discovered nebula was found at a distance of 10 billion light years in the middle of a region with an extraordinary concentration of galaxies. Researchers found this massive overdensity of early galaxies, called a "protocluster," through a novel survey project led by Zheng Cai, a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Santa Cruz. "Our survey was not trying to find nebulae. We're looking for the most overdense environments in the early universe, the big cities where there are lots of galaxies," said Cai. "We found this enormous nebula in the middle of the protocluster, near the peak density." Cai is first author of a paper on the discovery accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal and available online at arxiv.org/abs/1609.04021. His survey project is called Mapping the Most Massive Overdensities Through Hydrogen (MAMMOTH), and the newly discovered ELAN is known as MAMMOTH-1. Coauthor J. Xavier Prochaska, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz, said previously discovered ELANs have been detected in quasar surveys. In those cases, the intense radiation from a quasar illuminated hydrogen gas in the nebula, causing it to emit Lyman-alpha radiation. Prochaska's team discovered the first ELAN, dubbed the "Slug Nebula," in 2014. MAMMOTH-1 is the first one not associated with a visible quasar, he said. "It's extremely bright, and it's probably larger than the Slug Nebula, but there's nothing else visible except the faint smudge of a galaxy. So it's a terrifically energetic phenomenon without an obvious power source," Prochaska said. Equally impressive is the enormous protocluster in which it resides, he said. Protoclusters are the precursors to galaxy clusters, which consist of hundreds to thousands of galaxies bound together by gravity. Because protoclusters are spread out over a much larger area of the sky, they are much harder to find than galaxy clusters. The protocluster hosting the MAMMOTH-1 nebula is massive, with an unusually high concentration of galaxies in an area about 50 million light years across. Because it is so far away (10 billion light years), astronomers are in effect looking back in time to see the protocluster as it was 10 billion years ago, or about 3 billion years after the big bang, during the peak epoch of galaxy formation. After evolving for 10 billion more years, this protocluster would today be a mature galaxy cluster perhaps only one million light years across, having collapsed down to a much smaller area, Prochaska said. The standard cosmological model of structure formation in the universe predicts that galaxies are embedded in a cosmic web of matter, most of which is invisible dark matter. The gas that collapses to form galaxies and stars traces the distribution of dark matter and extends beyond the galaxies along the filaments of the cosmic web. The MAMMOTH-1 nebula appears to have a filamentary structure that aligns with the galaxy distribution in the large-scale structure of the protocluster, supporting the idea that ELANs are illuminated segments of the cosmic web, Cai said. "From the distribution of galaxies we can infer where the filaments of the cosmic web are, and the nebula is perfectly aligned with that structure," he said. Cai and his coauthors considered several possible mechanisms that could be powering the Lyman-alpha emission from the nebula. The most likely explanations involve radiation or outflows from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) that is strongly obscured by dust so that only a faint source can be seen associated with the nebula. An AGN is powered by a supermassive black hole actively feeding on gas in the center of a galaxy, and it is usually an extremely bright source of light (quasars being the most luminous AGNs in visible light). The intense radiation from an AGN can ionize the gas around it (called photoionization), and this may be one mechanism at work in MAMMOTH-1. When ionized hydrogen in the nebula recombines it would emit Lyman-alpha radiation. Another possible mechanism powering the Lyman-alpha emissions is shock heating by a powerful outflow of gas from the AGN. The researchers described several lines of evidence supporting the existence of a hidden AGN energizing the nebula, including the dynamics of the gas and emissions from other elements besides hydrogen, notably helium and carbon. "It has all the hallmarks of an AGN, but we don't see anything in our optical images. I expect there's a quasar that is so obscured by dust that most of its light is hidden," Prochaska said. In addition to Cai and Prochaska at UC Santa Cruz, the team includes coauthors at Steward Observatory, University of Arizona; Korea Astronomy and Space Institute; Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australia; Pontifical Catholic University of Chile; Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich; California Institute of Technology; Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University; and National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation and NASA.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: spaceref.com

Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an "enormous Lyman-alpha nebula" (ELAN), it is the brightest and among the largest of these rare objects, only a handful of which have been observed. ELANs are huge blobs of gas surrounding and extending between galaxies in the intergalactic medium. They are thought to be parts of the network of filaments connecting galaxies in a vast cosmic web. Previously discovered ELANs are likely illuminated by the intense radiation from quasars, but it's not clear what is causing the hydrogen gas in the newly discovered nebula to emit Lyman-alpha radiation (a characteristic wavelength of light absorbed and emitted by hydrogen atoms). The newly discovered nebula was found at a distance of 10 billion light-years in the middle of a region with an extraordinary concentration of galaxies. Researchers found this massive overdensity of early galaxies, called a "protocluster," through a novel survey project led by Zheng Cai, a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Santa Cruz. "Our survey was not trying to find nebulae. We're looking for the most overdense environments in the early universe, the big cities where there are lots of galaxies," said Cai. "We found this enormous nebula in the middle of the protocluster, near the peak density." Cai is first author of a paper on the discovery accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal and available online. His survey project is called Mapping the Most Massive Overdensities Through Hydrogen (MAMMOTH), and the newly discovered ELAN is known as MAMMOTH-1. Coauthor J. Xavier Prochaska, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz, said previously discovered ELANs have been detected in quasar surveys. In those cases, the intense radiation from a quasar illuminated hydrogen gas in the nebula, causing it to emit Lyman-alpha radiation. Prochaska's team discovered the first ELAN, dubbed the "Slug Nebula," in 2014. MAMMOTH-1 is the first one not associated with a visible quasar, he said. "It's extremely bright, and it's probably larger than the Slug Nebula, but there's nothing else visible except the faint smudge of a galaxy. So it's a terrifically energetic phenomenon without an obvious power source," Prochaska said. Equally impressive is the enormous protocluster in which it resides, he said. Protoclusters are the precursors to galaxy clusters, which consist of hundreds to thousands of galaxies bound together by gravity. Because protoclusters are spread out over a much larger area of the sky, they are much harder to find than galaxy clusters. The protocluster hosting the MAMMOTH-1 nebula is massive, with an unusually high concentration of galaxies in an area about 50 million light-years across. Because it is so far away (10 billion light-years), astronomers are in effect looking back in time to see the protocluster as it was 10 billion years ago, or about 3 billion years after the big bang, during the peak epoch of galaxy formation. After evolving for 10 billion more years, this protocluster would today be a mature galaxy cluster perhaps only one million light-years across, having collapsed down to a much smaller area, Prochaska said. The standard cosmological model of structure formation in the universe predicts that galaxies are embedded in a cosmic web of matter, most of which is invisible dark matter. The gas that collapses to form galaxies and stars traces the distribution of dark matter and extends beyond the galaxies along the filaments of the cosmic web. The MAMMOTH-1 nebula appears to have a filamentary structure that aligns with the galaxy distribution in the large-scale structure of the protocluster, supporting the idea that ELANs are illuminated segments of the cosmic web, Cai said. "From the distribution of galaxies we can infer where the filaments of the cosmic web are, and the nebula is perfectly aligned with that structure," he said. Cai and his coauthors considered several possible mechanisms that could be powering the Lyman-alpha emission from the nebula. The most likely explanations involve radiation or outflows from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) that is strongly obscured by dust so that only a faint source can be seen associated with the nebula. An AGN is powered by a supermassive black hole actively feeding on gas in the center of a galaxy, and it is usually an extremely bright source of light (quasars being the most luminous AGNs in visible light). The intense radiation from an AGN can ionize the gas around it (called photoionization), and this may be one mechanism at work in MAMMOTH-1. When ionized hydrogen in the nebula recombines it would emit Lyman-alpha radiation. Another possible mechanism powering the Lyman-alpha emissions is shock heating by a powerful outflow of gas from the AGN. The researchers described several lines of evidence supporting the existence of a hidden AGN energizing the nebula, including the dynamics of the gas and emissions from other elements besides hydrogen, notably helium and carbon. "It has all the hallmarks of an AGN, but we don't see anything in our optical images. I expect there's a quasar that is so obscured by dust that most of its light is hidden," Prochaska said. * "Discovery of an Enormous Ly-alpha Nebula in a Massive Galaxy Overdensity at z = 2.3," Zheng Cai et al., 2017, to appear in the Astrophysical Journal [http://apj.aas.org, preprint: https://arxiv.org/abs/1609.04021]. * "MApping the Most Massive Overdensities Through Hydrogen (MAMMOTH) I: Methodology," Zheng Cai et al., 2016 Dec. 20, Astrophysical Journal [http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/833/2/135 , preprint: https://arxiv.org/abs/1512.06859]. In addition to Cai and Prochaska at UC Santa Cruz, the team includes coauthors at Steward Observatory, University of Arizona; Korea Astronomy and Space Institute; Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australia; Pontifical Catholic University of Chile; Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich; California Institute of Technology; Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University; and National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation and NASA. Please follow SpaceRef on Twitter and Like us on Facebook.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In a protocluster of ancient galaxies far, far away, lies a glowing nebula. The problem is, no one knows why it glows. Nearly 10 billion light-years from Earth lies a structure that has left astronomers baffled. The blob of gas, named MAMMOTH-1, is glowing brightly, even though there is no discernable source illuminating it. MAMMOTH-1 is a nebula that lies in an overdense protocluster of ancient galaxies. It belongs to a class of objects known as enormous Lyman-alpha nebulae (ELAN), which shine brightly in the Lyman-alpha line associated with hydrogen gas that has been heated up by the ultraviolet emissions of newly-formed stars. The first ELAN, discovered in 2014, was named the Slug Nebula, and scientists believe that it — as well as most other ELANs detected since then — is emitting Lyman-alpha radiation as a result of being illuminated by intense radiation from quasars. Quasar — a quasi-stellar radio source — is a compact region surrounding a galaxy’s supermassive black hole, heated to such an extent that it emits massive amounts of energy and can even outshine the galaxy in which it resides. MAMMOTH-1 (named after the survey that detected it — Mapping the Most Massive Overdensities Through Hydrogen), however, is the first ELAN not associated with a visible quasar. “It's extremely bright, and it's probably larger than the Slug Nebula, but there's nothing else visible except the faint smudge of a galaxy. So it's a terrifically energetic phenomenon without an obvious power source,” J. Xavier Prochaska, a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who was part of the team that discovered the nebula, said in a statement. So what exactly is powering the Lyman-alpha emissions from MAMMOTH-1? One possible explanation, outlined in a study accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal, could be outflows from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) — which is itself being powered by a supermassive black hole. The AGN, of which the quasar can be a part, may be so obscured by dust that only a faint source can be seen associated with the MAMMOTH-1 nebula. Although there is strong evidence to suggest that a hidden AGN is energizing the nebula, it is yet to be seen in optical images. “I expect there's a quasar that is so obscured by dust that most of its light is hidden,” Prochaska said in the statement. Scientists believe that understanding the exact amount of Lyman-alpha photons emitted by galactic protoclusters and nebulae, and how this amount changes over time, is key to comprehending not only the evolution of galaxies and stars, but also to getting a clearer picture of the conditions prevalent when the universe was still young.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: phys.org

ELANs are huge blobs of gas surrounding and extending between galaxies in the intergalactic medium. They are thought to be parts of the network of filaments connecting galaxies in a vast cosmic web. Previously discovered ELANs are likely illuminated by the intense radiation from quasars, but it's not clear what is causing the hydrogen gas in the newly discovered nebula to emit Lyman-alpha radiation (a characteristic wavelength of light absorbed and emitted by hydrogen atoms). The newly discovered nebula was found at a distance of 10 billion light years in the middle of a region with an extraordinary concentration of galaxies. Researchers found this massive overdensity of early galaxies, called a "protocluster," through a novel survey project led by Zheng Cai, a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Santa Cruz. "Our survey was not trying to find nebulae. We're looking for the most overdense environments in the early universe, the big cities where there are lots of galaxies," said Cai. "We found this enormous nebula in the middle of the protocluster, near the peak density." Cai is first author of a paper on the discovery accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal and available online at arxiv.org/abs/1609.04021. His survey project is called Mapping the Most Massive Overdensities Through Hydrogen (MAMMOTH), and the newly discovered ELAN is known as MAMMOTH-1. Coauthor J. Xavier Prochaska, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz, said previously discovered ELANs have been detected in quasar surveys. In those cases, the intense radiation from a quasar illuminated hydrogen gas in the nebula, causing it to emit Lyman-alpha radiation. Prochaska's team discovered the first ELAN, dubbed the "Slug Nebula," in 2014. MAMMOTH-1 is the first one not associated with a visible quasar, he said. "It's extremely bright, and it's probably larger than the Slug Nebula, but there's nothing else visible except the faint smudge of a galaxy. So it's a terrifically energetic phenomenon without an obvious power source," Prochaska said. Equally impressive is the enormous protocluster in which it resides, he said. Protoclusters are the precursors to galaxy clusters, which consist of hundreds to thousands of galaxies bound together by gravity. Because protoclusters are spread out over a much larger area of the sky, they are much harder to find than galaxy clusters. The protocluster hosting the MAMMOTH-1 nebula is massive, with an unusually high concentration of galaxies in an area about 50 million light years across. Because it is so far away (10 billion light years), astronomers are in effect looking back in time to see the protocluster as it was 10 billion years ago, or about 3 billion years after the big bang, during the peak epoch of galaxy formation. After evolving for 10 billion more years, this protocluster would today be a mature galaxy cluster perhaps only one million light years across, having collapsed down to a much smaller area, Prochaska said. The standard cosmological model of structure formation in the universe predicts that galaxies are embedded in a cosmic web of matter, most of which is invisible dark matter. The gas that collapses to form galaxies and stars traces the distribution of dark matter and extends beyond the galaxies along the filaments of the cosmic web. The MAMMOTH-1 nebula appears to have a filamentary structure that aligns with the galaxy distribution in the large-scale structure of the protocluster, supporting the idea that ELANs are illuminated segments of the cosmic web, Cai said. "From the distribution of galaxies we can infer where the filaments of the cosmic web are, and the nebula is perfectly aligned with that structure," he said. Cai and his coauthors considered several possible mechanisms that could be powering the Lyman-alpha emission from the nebula. The most likely explanations involve radiation or outflows from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) that is strongly obscured by dust so that only a faint source can be seen associated with the nebula. An AGN is powered by a supermassive black hole actively feeding on gas in the center of a galaxy, and it is usually an extremely bright source of light (quasars being the most luminous AGNs in visible light). The intense radiation from an AGN can ionize the gas around it (called photoionization), and this may be one mechanism at work in MAMMOTH-1. When ionized hydrogen in the nebula recombines it would emit Lyman-alpha radiation. Another possible mechanism powering the Lyman-alpha emissions is shock heating by a powerful outflow of gas from the AGN. The researchers described several lines of evidence supporting the existence of a hidden AGN energizing the nebula, including the dynamics of the gas and emissions from other elements besides hydrogen, notably helium and carbon. "It has all the hallmarks of an AGN, but we don't see anything in our optical images. I expect there's a quasar that is so obscured by dust that most of its light is hidden," Prochaska said. Explore further: Distant quasar illuminates a filament of the cosmic web More information: "Discovery of an Enormous Ly-alpha Nebula in a Massive Galaxy Overdensity at z = 2.3," Zheng Cai et al., 2017, Astrophysical Journal, arxiv.org/abs/1609.04021 "MApping the Most Massive Overdensities Through Hydrogen (MAMMOTH) I: Methodology," Zheng Cai et al., 2016 Dec. 20, Astrophysical Journal iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/833/2/135 , arxiv.org/abs/1512.06859


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.10M | Year: 2015

Composite structures are massively exploited in many engineering fields. For instance, the state-of-the-art civil aircraft (B787 and A350) are mostly made of composite materials. The design of composites leads to challenging tasks since those competencies that stemmed from the adoption of metallic materials are often inadequate for composites. Insights on many different disciplines and tight academic/industrial cooperation are required to fully exploit composite structure capabilities. The skills and the employability of young researchers increase to a great extent through an interdisciplinary and intersectoral training. The existing training schemes are often based on specific themes and disciplines rather than on a broad interdisciplinary and academic-industrial integrated approach. The main aim and novelty of this project is the creation of a multidisciplinary, intersectoral and international research training network based on a strong academic basis and industrial partnerships for a new generation of top talented young researchers that will work in the European academic and industrial scenarios. The multidisciplinary features are guaranteed by the presence of 7 universities, 1 research centre and 1 industry. The intersectoral approach will be pursued by including secondments and specific industrial training requirements in each individual project. The consortium is composed by partners from 8 countries. OTC partners were included for secondment and training opportunities; they were chosen on the basis of their expertise and to enhance the internationality features of the training. Their presence is seen as an opportunity for the European partners and researchers to strengthen competencies. The full spectrum of the design of composite structures will be dealt with - manufacturing, health-monitoring, failure, modelling, multiscale approaches, testing, prognosis and prognostic - to develop integrated analysis tools to improve the design of composites.


The invention relates to a method and a system for detecting, transmitting, and analyzing at least one safety-related signal (S1 . . . Sn), wherein the at least one safety-related signal (S1 . . . Sn) is detected using at least one detection unit (EE1 . . . EEn) and is transmitted to at least one analyzing unit (AE1 . . . AE4) via a radio system (FS). In order to simplify the detection of safety-related signals and improve the transmission thereof via a faulty radio path, at least two safety-related signals (S1, S2) are independently detected and transmitted to the analyzing unit (AE1 . . . AE4) via the radio system (FS) so as to allow a dangerous action to be carried out, and an output signal (FRS) for allowing a dangerous action to be carried out is generated by logically combining the received safety-related signals (S1 . . . Sn).


The invention relates to a method and a system for detecting, transmitting, and analyzing at least one safety-related signal (S1 . . . Sn), wherein the at least one safety-related signal (S1 . . . Sn) is detected using at least one detection unit (EE1 . . . EEn) and is transmitted to at least one analyzing unit (AE1 . . . AE4) via a radio system (FS). In order to simplify the detection of safety-related signals and improve the transmission thereof via a faulty radio path, at least two safety-related signals (S1, S2) are independently detected and transmitted to the analyzing unit (AE1 . . . AE4) via the radio system (FS) so as to allow a dangerous action to be carried out, and an output signal (FRS) for allowing a dangerous action to be carried out is generated by logically combining the received safety-related signals (S1 . . . Sn).


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an 'enormous Lyman-alpha nebula' (ELAN), it is the brightest and among the largest of these rare objects, only a handful of which have been observed.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Elan Industries, a manufacturer of electronic controls for some of the best known brands of residential and commercial appliances, announces that they have been certified under ISO 9001:2015 as of Jan. 6, 2017. The company previously earned certification under ISO 9001:2008 in 2003 and has been audited and registered annually by Perry Johnson Registrars, Inc. since 2013. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9001:2015 is the most updated standard of its kind and focuses on quality management systems and performance. It assists companies in developing a management system that aligns quality with their wider business strategy. There is a focus on risk-based thinking and accountability in all organizational processes that helps improve communications, efficiency, and implementation of continuous improvement. “We are excited to earn certification to ISO 9001:2015 and feel it provides additional assurance to our customers that we are focused on continuous improvement and customer satisfaction,” said Elan Chief Operating Officer John Tomaras. “Our move from ISO 9001:2008 to the updated standard demonstrates our desire to always perform at the highest levels of quality and efficiency. It’s essential to delivering innovative, high quality and customer-focused electronic solutions to our customers.” For any company, the road to certification requires time and commitment. Elan began their internal preparation for certification in March of 2016, by evaluating their existing procedures and aligning them with the new requirements. Since their documentation and procedures were already well established and compliant with ISO 9001:2008, they only needed to make minor changes to their quality manual and overall processes and procedures to meet the new standards. In advance of their required internal audit, Elan sent six of their key staff members through auditor training to become certified internal auditors. This allowed the company to simultaneously complete internal audits in each department throughout the year and prior to the annual recertification audit. In December of 2016, Perry Johnson Registrars, Inc. performed the mandatory recertification audit. They then notified Elan of their achievement of the ISO 9001:2015 standard on Jan. 6, 2017. Elan controls appear on appliances worldwide, ranging from the simplest temperature control to highly complex, multi-function platform controls. The company’s corporate headquarters, design center, and manufacturing facility is located in Bolingbrook, IL. ABOUT ELAN INDUSTRIES Elan Industries is a design engineering and manufacturing firm and strategic partner helping OEMs of residential and commercial appliances develop custom control products / solutions to deliver a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Elan is a leader in IoT and wireless technology, developing electronic controls that function through Bluetooth, apps and WiFi from ElanConnect™. Elan controls can be found on residential and commercial appliances sold worldwide. For more information on Elan Industries, visit elanindustries.com or call 630.679.2000.

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