Norwood, MA, United States

EIC Laboratories, Inc.

www.eiclabs.com
Norwood, MA, United States
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Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 990.97K | Year: 2014

The remediation of underground nuclear waste storage tanks and associated disposal cribs and trenches at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear waste storage facilities, together with the associated needs to characterize and monitor the chemical compositions of the contaminants, presents a major scientific challenge. Several of these storage tanks are leaking, and significant quantities of wastes have leaked into the surrounding soil that extends to the vadose zone, which is the unsaturated region above the water table. The major isotopes of concern are 99Tc, 90Sr, 3H (tritium), 137Cs, 60Co, U, Pu, and Am. The danger posed by these radioisotopes entering the water system makes contamination of subsurface water below the vadose zone an urgent problem. Subsurface contamination by technetium is of particular concern for two reasons: the extremely long lifetime of its most common isotope 99Tc and the fast migration in soils of pertechnetate (TcO4), its most chemical forms. A novel spectroelectrochemical sensor will be develop for technetium, in particular pertechnetate, that can be used for in situ ground water monitoring in the vadose zone at the DOE nuclear waste storage tank farms. The sensor that will be developed will employ a preconcentrating polymer for pertechnetate in which a ligand for Tc will be incorporated and where upon reduction of the ligand-Tc complex will produce a luminescent analyte. Commercial Applications and OtherBenefits: The primary market opportunity is for monitoring leakage and migration of Tc into groundwater surrounding nuclear waste storage sites and nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Monitoring groundwater at nuclear power plants or where there has been an accident is another potential market for this technology.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2013

The remediation of underground nuclear waste storage tanks and associated disposal cribs and trenches at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear waste storage facilities, together with the associated needs to characterize and monitor the chemical compositions of the contaminants, presents a major scientific challenge. Several of these storage tanks are leaking, and significant quantities of wastes have leaked into the surrounding soil that extends to the vadose zone, which is the unsaturated region above the water table. The danger posed by these radioisotopes entering the water system makes contamination of subsurface water below the vadose zone an urgent problem. Subsurface contamination by technetium is of particular concern for two reasons: the extremely long lifetime of its most common isotope 99Tc and the fast migration in soils of pertechnetate (TcO4), its most chemical forms. A novel spectroelectrochemical sensor will be developed for technetium, in particular pertechnetate, that can be used for in situ ground water monitoring in the vadose zone at the DOE nuclear waste storage tank farms. The sensor that will be developed will employ a preconcentrating polymer for pertechnetate with built-in chemistry for converting it to a luminescent product. The product is detected spectroelectrochemically at below the drinking water action levels. Commercial applications and other benefits: The primary market opportunity is for monitoring leakage and migration of Tc into groundwater surrounding nuclear waste storage sites and nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Monitoring groundwater at nuclear power plants or where there has been an accident is another potential market for this technology.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.93K | Year: 2015

Rechargeable lithium ion battery systems can provide power throughout the aircraft, including engine or Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) starting, avionics, emergency, and other systems. Because of their high specific energy/power and potential thermal instability, they can present hazards if improperly designed, tested, handled, or stored. To address the thermal safety issue of Li-ion batteries, EIC Labs, in collaboration with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is working on the development of safe, large-format aircraft Li-ion batteries where thermal propagation of an overheated cell to neighboring cells or group of cells is prevented by novel thermal management technologies.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2013

NASA's Science Instruments, Observatories, and Sensor Systems Roadmap calls for instruments capable of in situ mineralogical analysis in support of planetary missions in the coming decades. Such instruments will provide capabilities for surveying and identifying minerals on and beneath planetary surfaces, guided by robotic vehicles. These instruments should be highly reliable and compact, be remotely operable and require minimal operating resources. To meet this challenge, the goal of the proposed Phase I program is to develop a combined Raman and infrared fiber optically coupled probe head that can be used for mineral analysis by providing a complete vibrational spectroscopic fingerprint for high quality in situ mineral identification that can be used in a variety of NASA platforms.For the Phase I work, the goal will be to prototype a dual excitation Raman/IR fiber optically coupled microscope probe head and demonstrate its utility in the analysis of minerals.The Phase I Work Plan includes:1. Prototyping of an Integrated Raman/IR probe head2. Performance Evaluation of the Integrated Raman/IR Probes3. Acquisition of a preliminary Raman and IR database, in collaboration with Dr. Robert Downs director of the RRUFF mineralogy project at the University of Arizona


Patent
EIC Laboratories, Inc. | Date: 2014-08-21

Subdural arrays transmit electrocorticogram recordings wirelessly, across the patients skull, allowing the craniotomy used for surgical placement of the arrays to be completely closed. In various embodiments, the arrays also respond to commands, applying signal patterns to the patients brain for diagnostic and treatment purposes.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2014

EIC, in collaboration with NREL, proposes to develop safe, large-format aircraft Li-ion batteries where thermal propagation of an overheated cell to neighboring cells or group of cells will be prevented by integrating novel thermal management technologies.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.87K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant An inexpensive disposable vapor sensor which can also be used for urinalysis can provide rapid field monitoring of pesticide exposure The sensor utilizes Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy SERS to detect chemicals like pesticides that adsorb strongly on roughened SERS substrates in the high parts pre trillion range As the sensors are tuned to the analytes of interest interferences from more concentrated chemicals are limited An earlier research program provided reliable results for organophosphate OP and organochlorine OC pesticides In that program OP and OC pesticides or metabolites were evaluated in the laboratory at the low ppb range with acephate and methyl parathion detection at farmworker camps In this program we will fabricate an innovative SERS sensing element for the detection of triazine pesticides such as atrazine simazine and cyromazine Sensors will be optimized by an azide loading to improve the electron density and yield strong hydrogen bonding with the triazine amine groups This novel sensor is expected to detect triazines in concentrations of ppb or less and withstand the temperature and humidity conditions encountered by farmworkers The new sensor can be easily combined with our previous sensor to measure andgt pesticides or metabolites at a fraction of the cost of current analytical laboratory methods thus providing the NIH particularly the NIEHS Exposure Biology program with a large data set on the daily exposure ingestion of pesticides This data will allow epidemiological studies and predictions of long term health outcomes Core technology concepts have been demonstrated A previous program demonstrated organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can be detected down as low as ppt EIC Laboratories has demonstrated in preliminary studies that an azide coated SERS sensor is several orders of magnitude more sensitive to triazines than previous sensors The Phase I program is designed to demonstrate detection of triazine pesticides and metabolites at the ppb level show an extended field lifetime and an increased sensitivity for direct readings of triazine pesticide metabolites PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE This SBIR proposal develops a field analysis protocol for a novel Surface enhanced Raman sensor for triazine pesticides broadleaf weed killers directly or as metabolites in the urine of high risk populations such as farmworkers The sensor can provide timely results at significantly lower cost than other current protocols allowing more sampling of at risk populations and creating a database for epidemiological studies and health outcome predictions This sensor coupled at negligible cost to an already developed sensor will detect andgt pesticides metabolites and report results to the farmworkers within h at andlt the cost of sending samples to an analytical laboratory that can have analysis lag times of andgt months


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2013

Concrete is widely used in light water reactor (LWR) constructions as building foundations and support, shielding materials and for radiation containment. The integrity of construction materials like concrete is an important consideration and concern for LWR facilities since degradation of these structural materials can lead to costly maintenance and downtime and also increases the risk of safety. The cause of concrete deterioration can be attributed mainly to attack from chemicals present in the concrete or environment that can lead to chemical changes in the concrete over time. Technologies that can assess the integrity of LWR structures and provide means to mitigate the degradation of reactor structures will help prolong reactor life and diminish the risks of structural failure. A portable, nondestructive assessment (NDA) Raman spectroscopy instrumentation and fiber optically coupled sampling probes with microscopic imaging will be developed. The Raman probe is used to obtain Raman spectra and petrographic images of not only the surface of the concrete structures, but also depth profiles using small holes drilled into the structure. These data will be used to assess the onset or presence of chemical corrosion in the concrete structure. Commercial applications and other benefits: The principal market for the NDA Raman tool is in inspection of civil engineering structures. As the current program is focused on concrete aging in light water reactors, likely customers include the NRC as instrumentation provided to their regional inspectors. In addition, operators of the nearly 450 nuclear reactors worldwide are potential customers for instruments to conduct their own periodic in-house inspections.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2013

Past Department of Energy (DOE) operations at its weapons complex facilities involve the use of organic solvents that were then not properly disposed and released into the environment resulting in the contamination of soils and groundwater. DOE faces monumental remediation challenges in restoring these sites to their pristine conditions. Contaminated site restoration involved several steps, which include characterization, evaluation, selection, implantation of containment or restoration measures, and performance monitoring during and after remediation. Current monitoring methods are costly and time-intensive and mainly involve grab sampling of headspace gases from monitoring wells installed around the perimeter of these contaminated sites and then remotely analyzed at a laboratory by gas chromatograph technique. The integrity of the grab sampling protocol can be compromised during sample collection, transport and storage. Also, current requirements for surrounding aquifer contamination requires a more frequent sampling intervals that will be hard to be met by current methods because of cost and sampling time. A novel portable Raman instrument is proposed with a power buildup cavity sampling gas cell that can be used for quantitative vapor phase monitoring of soil gases for onsite use. This in situ monitoring instrument will allow direct analyses of monitoring well gases without the necessity of sampling and laboratory analysis. This will have an advantage of faster analysis time and a more cost effective sampling protocols. Commercial applications and other benefits: The principal market for the instrument will be the environmental monitoring field, mainly in the area of soil and groundwater monitoring where field-sampling instruments are needed to track leaks or migration of environmental contaminants underground. Other environmental markets where the Raman Gas Cell would find use is in air pollutants monitoring where the instrument could be used for monitoring the release of hazardous gases from industrial sites for regulatory purposes. Also, the instrument could find use in furnace atmosphere control monitoring where control and monitoring of effluents such as hydrocarbons gases are required.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.96K | Year: 2014

Concrete is widely used in light water reactor (LWR) constructions as building foundation and support, shielding material and for radiation containment. The importance of concrete in providing protection to LWR structures are found in the containment building, spent fuel pool and cooling towers. The integrity of construction materials like concrete is an important consideration and concern for LWR facilities since degradation of these structural materials can lead to costly maintenance and downtime and also increases the risk of safety. The cause of concrete deterioration can be attributed mainly to chemical attack from chemicals present in the concrete or environment that can lead to chemical changes in the concrete over time. Technologies that can assess the integrity of LWR structures and provide means to mitigate the degradation of reactor structures will help prolong reactor life and diminish the risks of structural failure. A portable, nondestructive assessment (NDA) Raman spectroscopy instrumentation and fiber optically coupled sampling probes with microscopic imaging will be developed. The Raman probe is used to obtain Raman spectra and petrographic image of not only the surface of the concrete structures, but also depth profiles using smallholes drilled into the structure. These data will be used to assess the onset or presence of chemical corrosion in the concrete structure. Commercial Applications and OtherBenefits: The principal market for the NDA Raman tool is in inspection of civil engineering structures. As the current program is focused on concrete aging in light water reactors, likely customers include the NRC as instrumentation provided to their regional inspectors. In addition, operators of the nearly 450 nuclear reactors worldwide are potential customers for instruments to conduct their own periodic in-house inspections.

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