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Hovenga E.,EHealth Education Pty Ltd | Grain H.,EHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics | Year: 2013

This study reports on an examination of the IT industry's Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) to determine if such a process and/or the use of this tool is suitable to be applied to the health informatics discipline. During this process, four sets of known and agreed-upon Health Informatics skill and knowledge domain statements and competencies were mapped to SFIA. The results showed that all high level SFIA skills apply to the health informatics discipline but that these need to be contextualized to suit the health industry and additional health industry specific skills and knowledge domains need to be included to truly reflect the necessary health informatics skill set from which competency statements can be developed. Adoption of an accord similar to the Seoul Accord process could be very beneficial in promoting a global understanding of the health informatics discipline. © 2013 IMIA and IOS Press.


Hovenga E.J.,eHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2013

The health workforce constitutes a very significant health system building block. As such it needs to have the capacity to influence how health data are captured, processed and used at all levels of decision making. This requires a national strategy that ensures all new health professional graduates are adequately prepared and that the existing workforce is developed to make the best possible use of all available digital technologies. This chapter provides an argument for why and how the health workforce should be contributing to health information governance, followed by an historical overview of various initiatives undertaken, the results achieved and issues identified during these processes. It concludes with an exploration of strategies that may be adopted to bring about change and achieve improvements.


Hovenga E.J.S.,eHealth Education Pty Ltd | Garde S.,Ocean Informatics
Electronic Journal of Health Informatics | Year: 2010

An opinion paper exploring links between sustainable health systems, electronic health records, semantic interoperability, standards and national e-health strategies. It provides a rationale for why there needs to be a paradigm shift in thinking and explains the need for adopting a set of technical standards and establishing a supporting national infrastructure. It is argued that only then can Governments expect to be able to successfully implement health reform to meet their future vision and achieve a sustainable health system. © of articles is retained by authors.


Hovenga E.,EHealth Education Pty Ltd | Grain H.,EHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics | Year: 2015

The use of EHRs and the benefits from them are significant for healthcare and health informatics. Data form the basis for any EHR and its potential to realize these benefits. This paper considers the housing of information and knowledge management in an EHR system. Are we experiencing a revolution in healthcare? Findings from an investigation of alternative approaches, followed by an evaluation of the importance of the adoption of a standard information model relative to benefit realization, is presented. We conclude that an EHR in any environment is not limited to sharing or information exchange. A paradigm shift in thinking, based on the requirement for standardized concept representation, is required. This is an essential prerequisite for a new vision of healthcare supported by digital technologies. © 2015 IMIA and IOS Press.


Hovenga E.J.,eHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2013

Health is a knowledge industry, based on data collected to support care, service planning, financing and knowledge advancement. Increasingly there is a need to collect, retrieve and use health record information in an electronic format to provide greater flexibility, as this enables retrieval and display of data in multiple locations and formats irrespective of where the data were collected. Electronically maintained records require greater structure and consistency to achieve this. The use of data held in records generated in real time in clinical systems also has the potential to reduce the time it takes to gain knowledge, as there is less need to collect research specific information, this is only possible if data governance principles are applied. Connected devices and information systems are now generating huge amounts of data, as never before seen. An ability to analyse and mine very large amounts of data, "Big Data", provides policy and decision makers with new insights into varied aspects of work and information flow and operational business patterns and trends, and drives greater efficiencies, and safer and more effective health care. This enables decision makers to apply rules and guidance that have been developed based upon knowledge from many individual patient records through recognition of triggers based upon that knowledge. In clinical decision support systems information about the individual is compared to rules based upon knowledge gained from accumulated information of many to provide guidance at appropriate times in the clinical process. To achieve this the data in the individual system, and the knowledge rules must be represented in a compatible and consistent manner. This chapter describes data attributes; explains the difference between data and information; outlines the requirements for quality data; shows the relevance of health data standards; and describes how data governance impacts representation of content in systems and the use of that information.


Hovenga E.J.,eHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2013

Health information provides the foundation for all decision making in healthcare whether clinical at the bed side, or at a national government level. This information is generally collected as part of systems which support administrative or clinical workflow and practice. This chapter describes the many and varied features of systems such as electronic health records (EHRs), how they fit with health information systems and how they collectively manage information flow. Systems engineering methods and tools are described together with their use to suit the health industry. This focuses on the need for suitable system architectures and semantic interoperability. These concepts and their relevance to the health industry are explained. The relationship and requirements for appropriate data governance in these systems is also considered.


Hovenga E.J.,eHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2013

This chapter gives an overview of health data, information and knowledge governance needs and associated generic principles so that information systems are able to automate such data collections from point-of-care operational systems. Also covered are health information systems' dimensions and known barriers to the delivery of quality health services, including environmental, technology and governance influences of any population's health status within the context of national health systems. This is where health information managers and health informaticians need to resolve the many challenges associated with eHealth implementations where data are assets, efficient information flow is essential, the ability to acquire new knowledge desirable, and where the use of data and information needs to be viewed from a governance perspective to ensure reliable and quality information is obtained to enhance decision making.


Hovenga E.J.,eHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2013

All communication within the health industry is dependent upon the use of our health language consisting of a very extensive and complex vocabulary. Converting this language into computable formats is necessary in a digital environment with a strong reliance on data, information and knowledge sharing. This chapter describes our health language, what terminologies and ontologies are, their use and relationships with natural language, indexing, data standards, data collections and the need for data governance.


Hovenga E.J.,eHealth Education Pty Ltd
Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2013

This chapter gives an overview of a nation's healthcare system, particularly for those who are familiar with IT but not healthcare or for those working in one area of healthcare who may not be familiar with the system and data requirements across the care continuum. The structure of this chapter uses the World Health Organisation's (WHO) Health systems framework with a focus on the need for data and information governance to achieve a sustainable health system delivering improved health for all, responsively and equitably meeting genuine demands for health services, with social and financial risk protection and overall improved efficiency. It is argued that there is a need to gather the right data and to process these data in a manner that provides good information in order to more fully understand how the health system is working and where and when it isn't working well. This needs to be achieved in the most cost effective manner that doesn't detract from the allocation of resources to healthcare or the clinical workflow required to achieve quality healthcare.


PubMed | eHealth Education Pty Ltd
Type: | Journal: Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2016

A globally agreed well structured framework representing the health informatics disciplines body of knowledge is yet to emerge. Considerable progress has been made towards describing this over the fifty or so years of the disciplines evolution. This contribution explains the need for such a structured body of knowledge from an educational and workforce capacity building perspective. Some examples of how education and training has been provided to date by a few key stakeholders/leaders are given and critical reviews of guideline and competency developments and their applications are presented. This is followed by an explanation of the need for linking health informatics research with education, learning and training strategies and desired future directions to overcome the identified health workforce knowledge and skills gaps are explored. Given the increasingly important role of health IT in health care, and the significant investment being made into Health IT systems and infrastructure, it is illogical not to seriously invest in health workforce capacity building.

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