Education Development Center Inc.

Newton, MA, United States

Education Development Center Inc.

Newton, MA, United States
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Lauby J.L.,Public Health Management Corporation | Marks G.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Liau A.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Stueve A.,Education Development Center Inc | Millett G.A.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
AIDS and Behavior | Year: 2012

We examined the hypothesis that black and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) who have supportive social relationships with other people are less likely to have unrecognized HIV infection compared with MSM of color who report lower levels of social support. We interviewed 1286 black and Latino MSM without known HIV infection in three metropolitan areas who were recruited using respondent driven sampling. Participants completed a computer-administered questionnaire and were tested for HIV. Unrecognized HIV infection was found in 118 men (9.2%). MSM who scored higher on the supportive relationship index had significantly lower odds of testing HIV-positive in the study. The mediation analysis identified two possible behavioral pathways that may partially explain this association: men who had strong supportive relationships were more likely to have had a test for HIV infection in the past 2 years and less likely to have recently engaged in high-risk sexual behavior. The findings illuminate the protective role of social relationships among MSM of color in our sample. ©2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Trockel M.,Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research | Trockel M.,Stanford University | Karlin B.E.,Health-U | Karlin B.E.,Education Development Center Inc. | And 6 more authors.
Sleep | Year: 2015

Objective: To examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on suicidal ideation among Veterans with insomnia. Design: Longitudinal data collected in the course of an uncontrolled evaluation of a large-scale CBT-I training program. Setting: Outpatient and residential treatment facilities. Participants: Four hundred five Veterans presenting for treatment of insomnia. Interventions: Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Measurement and Results: At baseline, 32% of patients, compared with 21% at final assessment, endorsed some level of suicidal ideation [χ2(df = 1) = 125; P < 0.001]. After adjusting for demographic variables and baseline insomnia severity, each 7-point decrease in Insomnia Severity Index score achieved during CBT-I treatment was associated with a 65% (odds ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence intervals = 0.24 to 0.52) reduction in odds of suicidal ideation. The effect of change in insomnia severity on change in depression severity was also significant. After controlling for change in depression severity and other variables in the model, the effect of change in insomnia severity on change in suicidal ideation remained significant. Conclusion: This evaluation of the largest dissemination of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in the United States found a clinically meaningful reduction in suicidal ideation among Veterans receiving CBT-I. The mechanisms by which effective treatment of insomnia with CBT-I reduces suicide risk are unknown and warrant investigation. The current results may have significant public health implications for preventing suicide among Veterans.


Langford L.,Education Development Center Inc. | Langford L.,Suicide Prevention Resource Center | Litts D.,Education Development Center Inc. | Pearson J.L.,National Institute of Mental Health
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2013

Concern about suicide in US military and veteran populations has prompted efforts to identify more effective preventionmeasures. Recent expert panel reports have recommended public communications as one component of a comprehensive effort. Messaging about military and veteran suicide originates from many sources and often does not support suicide prevention goals or adhere to principles for developing effective communications. There is an urgent need for strategic, science-based, consistent messaging guidance in this area. Although literature on the effectiveness of suicide prevention communications for these populations is lacking, this article summarizes key findings from several bodies of research that offer lessons for creating safe and effective messages that support and enhance military and veteran suicide prevention efforts. Copyright © 2012 by the American Public Health Association®.


Wood M.E.,University of Vermont | Flynn B.S.,University of Vermont | Stockdale A.,Education Development Center Inc
Public Health Genomics | Year: 2013

Background: Risk stratification based on family history is a feature of screening guidelines for a number of cancers and referral guidelines for genetic counseling/testing for cancer risk. Aims: Our aim was to describe primary care physician perceptions of their role in managing cancer risk based on family history. Methods: Structured interviews were conducted by a medical anthropologist with primary care physicians in 3 settings in 2 north-eastern states. Transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Results: Forty interviews were conducted from May 2003 through May 2006. Physicians provided a diversity of views on roles in management of cancer risk based on family history, management practices and patient responses to risk information. They also provided a wide range of perspectives on criteria used for referral to specialists, types of specialists referred to and expected management roles for referred patients. Conclusion: Some primary care physicians appeared to make effective use of family history information for cancer risk management, but many in this sample did not. Increased focus on efficient assessment tools based on recognized guidelines, accessible guides to management options, and patient education and decision aids may be useful directions to facilitate broader use of family history information for cancer risk management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Wood M.E.,University of Vermont | Flynn B.S.,University of Vermont | Stockdale A.,Education Development Center Inc.
Public Health Genomics | Year: 2013

Background: Risk stratification based on family history is a feature of screening guidelines for a number of cancers and referral guidelines for genetic counseling/testing for cancer risk. Aims: Our aim was to describe primary care physician perceptions of their role in managing cancer risk based on family history. Methods: Structured interviews were conducted by a medical anthropologist with primary care physicians in 3 settings in 2 north-eastern states. Transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Results: Forty interviews were conducted from May 2003 through May 2006. Physicians provided a diversity of views on roles in management of cancer risk based on family history, management practices and patient responses to risk information. They also provided a wide range of perspectives on criteria used for referral to specialists, types of specialists referred to and expected management roles for referred patients. Conclusion: Some primary care physicians appeared to make effective use of family history information for cancer risk management, but many in this sample did not. Increased focus on efficient assessment tools based on recognized guidelines, accessible guides to management options, and patient education and decision aids may be useful directions to facilitate broader use of family history information for cancer risk management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Dill E.J.,United Health Centers | Dawson R.,Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation | Sellers D.E.,Education Development Center Inc | Robinson W.M.,Education Development Center Inc | Sawicki G.S.,Harvard University
Chest | Year: 2013

Background: Health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) measures have been used as patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials in cystic fi brosis (CF), but there are limited data on HRQOL changes over time in adults with CF. Methods: The Project on Adult Care in Cystic Fibrosis, a prospective, longitudinal panel study of 333 adults with CF at 10 CF centers in the United States, administered a disease-specifi c HRQOL measure, the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (CFQ-R), seven times over 21 months. The CFQ-R assesses both physical and psychosocial domains of health. Growth curve regression models were developed for each CFQ-R domain, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Between 205 and 303 adults completed surveys (response rate, 70%-93%). Mean age at baseline was 33 years (range, 19-64 years); mean FEV 1 % predicted was 59.8% (SD, 22%). Over the 21 months of follow-up, lung function, frequency of pulmonary exacerbations, and nutritional indices were associated with physical CFQ-R domain scores. There were no signifi cant population trends over time in the physical domain scores; however, there were population time trends in three psychosocial domains: treatment burden (1 8.9 points/y), emotional functioning (1 3.2 points/y), and social functioning (2 2.4 points/y). Individual variation in both physical and psychosocial subscales was seen over 21 months. Conclusions: In a longitudinal multicenter population of adults with CF, clinical variables such as FEV 1, exacerbation frequency, and weight were correlated with related CFQ-R subscales. For the population as a whole, the physical domains of CFQ-R, such as respiratory symptoms, were stable. In contrast, population changes in several psychosocial domains of CFQ-R suggest that differentiating between the physical and the psychosocial trajectories in health among adults with CF is critical in evaluating patient-reported outcomes.


Sawicki G.S.,Harvard University | Sellers D.E.,Education Development Center Inc. | Robinson W.M.,Education Development Center Inc.
Journal of Psychosomatic Research | Year: 2011

Objective: The objective of this work was to examine the relationship between illness perception, health status, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a cohort of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: In the Project on Adult Care in Cystic Fibrosis, we administered five subscales (Illness Consequences, Illness Coherence, Illness Timeline-Cyclical, Personal Control, and Treatment Control) of the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R). Multivariable linear regression analyses explored the associations between illness perception, health status, symptom burden, and physical and psychosocial HRQOL, as measured by various domains of the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (CFQ-R). Results: Among the 199 respondents (63% female; mean age, 36.8±10.2 years), IPQ-R scores did not differ on age, gender, or lung function. In multivariable regression models, neither clinical characteristics nor physical or psychological symptom burden scores were associated with CFQ-R physical domains. In contrast, higher scores on Illness Consequences were associated with lower psychosocial CFQ-R scores. Higher scores on the Illness Coherence and Personal Control scales were associated with higher psychosocial CFQ-R scores. Conclusion: Adults with CF report a high understanding of their disease, feel that CF has significant consequences, and endorse both personal and treatment control over their outcomes. Illness perceptions did not vary with increased age or worsening disease severity, suggesting that illness perceptions may develop during adolescence. Illness perceptions were associated with psychosocial, but not physical, aspects of HRQOL. Efforts to modify illness perceptions as part of routine clinical care and counseling may lead to improved quality of life for adults with CF. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Gropen J.,Education Development Center Inc. | Clark-Chiarelli N.,Education Development Center Inc. | Hoisington C.,Education Development Center Inc. | Ehrlich S.B.,University of Chicago
Child Development Perspectives | Year: 2011

This article argues that executive function (EF) capacity plays a critical role in preschoolers' ability to test and revise hypotheses and, furthermore, that young children can engage in the process of testing hypotheses before they are able to revise or confirm them. Research supports the view that this ability depends on their EF capacity to represent, and reflect on, hierarchical rules relating actions to predicted or observed outcomes (i.e., differences between what they predicted and what they observed). The article concludes by discussing the ramifications of this perspective for early science education. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development Perspectives © 2011 The Society for Research in Child Development.


O'Donnell L.,Education Development Center Inc.
Health promotion practice | Year: 2010

This study evaluates the Especially for Daughters intervention, which aims to provide urban Black and Latino parents with information and skills to support their daughters in delaying sexual initiation and alcohol use. In a randomized field trial, 268 families with sixth-graders were recruited from New York City public schools and assigned either to the intervention, a set of audio CDs mailed home; an attention-controlled condition (print materials); or controls. Girls completed classroom baseline and three follow-up surveys, and telephone surveys were conducted with parents. At follow-up, girls in the intervention reported fewer sexual risks (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.39, confidence interval [CI] = 0.17-0.88) and less drinking (AOR = 0.38, CI = 0.15-0.97, p < .05). Their parents reported greater self-efficacy to address alcohol and sex and more communication on these topics. This gender-specific parent education program was for communities with high rates of HIV, where early sexual onset is common and often fueled by alcohol.


Dejong W.,Boston University | DeRicco B.,Education Development Center Inc. | Schneider S.,Education Development Center Inc.
Journal of American College Health | Year: 2010

Objectives: This exploratory study examined pre-event drinking, or pregaming, by US college students. Participants: 112 undergraduates from 10 Pennsylvania colleges participated. Method: A focus group, including a written questionnaire, was conducted at each institution. Results: Only 35.7% of the participants had not pregamed during the last 2 weeks. Pregamers consumed an average of 4.9 (SD = 3.1) drinks during their most recent session. Gender, class year, and other demographic variables did not predict pregaming. Heavier drinkers, and those stating that the average student pregamed 3+ times in the last 2 weeks, were more likely to report pregaming in the last 2 weeks. How much students drink when pregaming is influenced by how much they expect to drink later on. Conclusion: Pregaming presents a growing challenge for campus officials. Additional research is needed on the nature of the problem and which combination of prevention strategies might best address this behavior. © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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