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PEACHTREE CITY, Ga.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Power management company Eaton announced its 2017 calendar of classes available at its SOURCE Lighting Education Center, the industry’s leading lighting educational facility offering workshops, symposiums and interactive, hands-on learning experiences. The facility, which has educated over 163,000 professionals and students, offers a wide variety of continuing education-accredited classes designed to broaden the understanding of lighting, controls and its applications. This year, the SOURCE curriculum includes new lighting controls classes ranging from fundamentals to advanced energy-saving controls strategies and classes on commissioning. Eaton’s commissioning classes focus on Eaton’s controls solutions and are designed for professionals who are already qualified to commission controls. These two-day to five-day classes include some of Eaton’s extensive offering of controls solutions including the company’s iLumin, Greengate, Fifth Light and new Distributed Low-Voltage Power (DLVP) System product lines. Located at Eaton’s lighting headquarters in Peachtree City, Georgia, the SOURCE classes are designed for industry professionals and students including lighting specifiers and interior designers, architects, utilities personnel, facility managers, retail planners, electrical contractors, energy-saving companies, engineers, distributors, builders, landscape architects, university students and end-users. “With the continued advancement of controls technology and its integration with light-emitting diodes (LED) lighting, we’ve expanded our curriculum to include additional classes focusing on controls,” said SOURCE Manager Rebecca Hadley-Catter, Eaton’s Lighting Division. “The classes range from basic fundamentals, where students will learn standard control methodologies, controls system approaches, codes and applications, to the latest energy-saving strategies for industrial, commercial, warehousing, and exterior environments.” Current available seminars/workshops for 2017 are: For full course descriptions and additional information or to register, visit the SOURCE classes calendar. In addition to these courses, the SOURCE can offer customized programs and timely updates of recent developments and technologies in the lighting industry. Please email TheSource@Eaton.com for more information. Eaton also holds a yearly lighting design competition for professionals and students. Information on the SOURCE Awards can be obtained at The LIGHTING reSOURCE. The current deadline is February 24. For more information on Eaton’s lighting solutions, visit www.eaton.com/lighting. Eaton delivers a range of innovative and reliable indoor and outdoor lighting solutions, as well as controls products specifically designed to maximize performance, energy efficiency and cost savings. Eaton lighting solutions serve customers in the commercial, industrial, retail, institutional, residential, utility and other markets. Eaton’s electrical business is a global leader with expertise in power distribution and circuit protection; backup power protection; control and automation; lighting and security; structural solutions and wiring devices; solutions for harsh and hazardous environments; and engineering services. Eaton is positioned through its global solutions to answer today’s most critical electrical power management challenges. Eaton is a power management company with 2016 sales of $19.7 billion. Eaton provides energy-efficient solutions that help our customers effectively manage electrical, hydraulic and mechanical power more efficiently, safely and sustainably. Eaton has approximately 95,000 employees and sells products to customers in more than 175 countries. For more information, visit www.eaton.com.


WASHINGTON, Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (VVMF) has received a $10 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. for the campaign to build the Education Center at The Wall. VVMF is the nonprofit organization that built the Vietnam Veterans Memorial...


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Getting admission in Akaki Tsereteli State University has become easier with the support and guidance of Education Consultancy. From course consultancy to fee structures, Education Consultancy handles all and more in favor of enthusiastic applicants. -- Confusion and cluelessness about courses and careers may have been rampant among graduating students but not anymore. The establishment of Education Consultancy, one of the leading educational services launched by Mr. Achal Shah in 2011 has ensured offering comprehensive guidance to students in the direction of choosing the most suitable courses and pursuing the same in reputed and recognized universities not just in India but the world over.At present, Educational Consultancy offers a diverse set of facilities that includes guidance on courses, guidance through admission processes and making forms of entrance exams of universities available at all times; and all this while ensuring lowest fee packages in India and overseas. As has been expressed by students and parents who have already experienced the advantages of approaching Education Consultancy, one can literally feel the load of uncertainties lifting from the shoulders after the very first session with the counselors itself.The recent addition of Akaki Tsereteli State University, one of the oldest and one of the most distinguished institutions of higher education in Georgia, to its present and rather celebrated list has been a milestone in the journey of this 5 year old guidance center. This inclusion has allowed students of arts, business, engineering, natural sciences, social sciences and medicine in India to explore a whole new dimension of higher education without having to worry over budget.The mission of Education Center has always revolved around offering a clearer perspective to students about the courses that will best assist their career choices in the near future. As far as parents are concerned, this innovative institution has played a significant role in easing worries about funding the courses, which is at present the biggest impediment that higher education among Indian students is fraught with.About Education Consultancy:Education Consultancy is one of the leading education guidance providing company that has been founded by Mr. Achal Shah in 2011. The consultancy presently covers leading universities in India and overseas as well.To know more about Education Consultancy and Akaki Tsereteli State University admissions, please visit http://www.educationconsultancy.co.in/ akaki-tsereteli- sta... Education ConsultancyContact Person: Mr. Achal ShahAddress: Kapadiya House,Beside Amrapali Complex,KarelibaugVadodara, Gujarat 390018 INPhone: +91-9898581881, 9737999344Email: educationconsultancy5@gmail.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

JACKSON, Tenn. - The Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) awarded the title of Outstanding Paper in Weed Technology to researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture. Matthew Wiggins, a recent Ph.D. graduate of UT's College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and Robert Hayes and Larry Steckel, both professors with UT's Department of Plant Sciences, co-authored the paper. "Evaluating Cover Crops and Herbicides for Glyphosate Resistant Palmer Amaranth Control in Cotton" appeared in Weed Technology in April 2016. The research evaluated four cover crops (cereal rye, crimson clover, hairy vetch and winter wheat) plus combinations of one grass and one legume followed by pre-emergence applications of fluometuron or acetochlor. The study showed that combinations of grass and legume cover crops accumulated the most biomass and reduced Palmer amaranth emergence by half compared to non-cover-treated areas. However, by 28 days after application, the cereal rye and wheat cover crops provided the best Palmer amaranth control. Herbicide-resistant weeds are a significant threat to agronomic crop production across the globe. Besides lost yields, Steckel estimates the costs of additional management can run from $35 - $100 per acre, depending on the crop. Integrating cultural practices, like cover crops, in weed management programs has been a central theme in UTIA weed science research for the past decade as scientists search for solutions to herbicide resistance. The Outstanding Paper award was presented February 6, 2017, during WSSA's annual meeting in Tucson, Arizona. "We're proud to honor true innovators who are making a significant mark on weed science through their commitment to research, education and teaching," said Janis McFarland, 2017 annual meeting program chair and incoming president of WSSA. The study was conducted at the West Tennessee AgResearch and Education Center in Jackson, Tennessee, and was partially funded by Cotton Incorporated through the Tennessee Cotton State Support Committee. Through its mission of research, teaching and extension, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture touches lives and provides Real. Life. Solutions. ag.tennessee.edu


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Imagine a space where great minds come together to help turn innovative ideas into fully implemented products. This scenario is becoming reality now that OSF Saint Francis, Inc. has joined forces with TEKMILL and become a shareholder in the company. TEKMILL is a contract design engineering, rapid prototyping and small-scale manufacturing company located in Champaign, Illinois on the campus of the University of Illinois Research Park. TEKMILL helps its clients refine their innovative ideas, create conceptual prototypes and realize high quality products. “For anyone who has ever scribbled on a napkin to try to show a friend or colleague an idea, our engineers and machinists can take that idea, build a prototype, test it and produce any quantity needed,” said Gary Durack, CEO of the TEKMILL. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to work with OSF, given its Mission and strong strategic approach to health care innovation.” OSF HealthCare owns OSF Saint Francis, Inc., which is comprised of health care-related businesses. Michelle Conger, Chief Strategy Officer for OSF HealthCare and Jeff White, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer for OSF Saint Francis, Inc. will now serve on the TEKMILL Board of Directors. “Our partnership with TEKMILL will enable us to extend our Ministry and our Mission by investing in products that will improve patient care and lower costs,” said Kevin Schoeplein, Chief Executive Officer at OSF HealthCare. “Together, we can make health care easier, faster and more connected.” The remaining TEKMILL shares are held by the Durack, Fox and Rauschenberger families. About TEKMILL TEKMILL turns raw materials and novel ideas into finished products. Its design engineers transform client concepts into manufacturable products, experienced machinists and technicians convert client designs into high quality assemblies, and business professionals provide services and mentoring to help technology entrepreneurs build successful companies. For more information, visit http://www.thetekmill.com. About OSF HealthCare OSF HealthCare, headquartered in Peoria, IL, is owned and operated by The Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis. OSF HealthCare has 11 hospitals throughout Illinois and Michigan as well as two colleges of nursing. The system partnered with the University of Illinois in 2013 to open the Jump Simulation & Education Center. OSF HealthCare and Jump Simulation are founding partners of MATTER, a hub of entrepreneurs and industry leaders in Chicago, IL working together to fuel health care innovation. OSF Ventures invests in new technology and devices to transform and improve health care. For more information, visit http://www.osfhealthcare.org.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

On Tuesday, Nov. 29, the School of Medicine will host an expert panel event and Q&A discussion in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium at UNC's FedEx Global Education Center -- the event is open to the public and audience questions are encouraged CHAPEL HILL, NC - Do you have questions about the Zika virus and how it spreads? If you're traveling this holiday season, do you know how to protect yourself from Zika? Do you have questions about Zika and pregnancy? Do you know all the ways the virus can be transmitted? What about the likelihood of a Zika epidemic here in North Carolina? With more than 4,175 cases of Zika reported in the U.S. and another 31,198 reported in U.S. territories as of Nov. 11, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns people not to be complacent when it comes to protecting one's self from the virus, especially for those who are traveling this holiday season and for women who are pregnant or considering pregnancy. Those who would like to learn more about the virus and its transmission are invited to attend "Unraveling Zika," an expert panel discussion and Q&A from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29, in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the UNC Fed Ex Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro St., in Chapel Hill. Claire Farel, MD, MPH, Medical Director of the UNC Infectious Diseases Clinic, will serve as moderator. Panelists include Helen Lazear, PhD, assistant professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Elizabeth Stringer, MD, associate professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and Anne Lyerly, MD, an obstetrician/gynecologist and bioethicist Women who are pregnant or who are planning a future pregnancy are the most vulnerable population at risk for Zika exposure. While Zika's effects are mild for most adults and non-infant children, if a woman is infected while pregnant, the virus can have devastating effects on the fetus. According to the Nov. 11 CDC statistics, there were 1,057 pregnant women in the continental U.S. and another 2,357 in U.S. territories who "reported any lab evidence of Zika virus infection." Click here for information about directions and parking. To submit a question you'd like to ask the panel, please email Caroline Curran at caroline.curran@unchealth.unc.edu.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Lightspeed Trading has launched an Education Center on its website as part of its ongoing efforts to provide helpful resources for traders at all levels of experience. Following the integration of TipRanks into the Lightspeed Trader platform and making those same research tools available to all Lightspeed Trading customers through the secure client area, Lightspeed has taken the next step in providing educational content to anyone visiting the website. The new trading Education Center includes a helpful glossary of important trading terms, articles on options trading from basic to advanced, as well as videos with trading tips, ideas, and product tutorials. The plan is to continue building out more educational content on all aspects of trading and the market to meet the varied needs of Lightspeed’s customer base as well as the broader trading community. “Lightspeed is committed to providing educational content to traders at every point in their market journey, whether they’re new to trading or have been doing it for years,” said Kevin Ott, Co-President of Lightspeed Trading. “Our Education Center is a wealth of information across a variety of mediums and we plan to continue growing it in the near future.” You can explore the Education Center at www.lightspeed.com or for more information about our brokerage services call 888.577.3123. A subsidiary of Professional Trading Solutions, Inc - Lightspeed Trading, LLC, is a FINRA and NFA member and a fully disclosed introducing broker-dealer based in New York City and Chicago. The Company offers securities and direct access brokerage, trading and advanced order routing services to their clients utilizing Lightspeed’s software products. Lightspeed Institutional is a division of Lightspeed Trading, LLC.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Beckwood Press Company, a leading manufacturer of custom hydraulic presses and automation systems and the Triform line of specialty forming equipment, is pleased to announce the launch of their new website. Designed with manufacturers in mind, the new beckwoodpress.com features a simplified menu structure, streamlined paths of discovery, and a responsive layout for all platforms. The site also offers in-depth information about forming applications, press frame styles, and maintenance strategies. The primary objective of this site redevelopment was to give visitors more resources while simplifying their experience. The new website offers a great Education Center where visitors can learn about new forming technologies and old technologies being used in new ways. It also hosts articles, white papers, videos, success stories, and more. “Our new website offers users a ‘customized’ experience with articles and technologies relevant to the specific needs of manufacturers and informative videos that illustrate the complexities of various manufacturing processes,” says Josh Dixon, Beckwood’s Director of Sales & Marketing. “Whether you’re a young engineer researching an upcoming equipment purchase or a seasoned plant manager looking to make your operation more efficient, you’re sure to gain inspiration and insight about the topics most important to you.” Beckwood Press Company is a leading hydraulic press manufacturer, located in St. Louis, MO USA. They offer quality, custom hydraulic presses for virtually every industry and application, including a line of temperature controlled presses for compression molding, composite forming and high-temperature Hot Forming / SPF applications. Beckwood also manufactures the Triform line of Sheet Hydroforming Presses in both Fluid Cell and Deep Draw configurations, hydraulic ring expanders / sizers, hot joggle presses, as well as a line of stretch forming machines for both extrusion, sheet / leading edge applications. Get the latest news from Beckwood at http://www.beckwoodpress.com/news.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Slide after slide after slide of bulleted text is boring. If one slide is boring, several more like it won't make things better. You might think you don't have the time or the expertise to make visually interesting slides. But the truth is, you don't need to be a graphic designer or even an expert in PowerPoint to create a good presentation—although you might need a little encouragement and inspiration. In this article, we'll turn a boring list of interesting owl facts into a few fun slides. My hope is to encourage you to explore your own creative abilities. I'm using PowerPoint 2016 on a Windows 10 64-bit system, but most of the techniques are valid in older versions. There's not a step-by-step set of instructions for those versions, but options and property settings are noted. You can download the demonstration .pptx or .ppt file or work with your own bullet points. Note: The .ppt file is limited: SmartArt can be viewed, but you can't edit those slides; the morph effect won't work; the Remove Background tool isn't available; and many of the predefined format and effects aren't available. You should be able to use the 365 browser version to apply most of these techniques. When running the presentation in the browser, the audio bar is visible in the last slide; the hide setting is a desktop-only option. Figure A shows a boring list of bullet points. In no way does this list convey the interesting information it actually represents. Figure B shows three SmartArt examples that add visual interest to the plain text list. The plain list is bad. The SmartArt examples are better, but the visual additions don't reinforce the content. We want to present our owl facts in a meaningful way that will help the audience remember the information we share. With a little work, we can turn this information into a few entertaining slides that support the content and are unforgettable—at least for a while. You can learn more about using SmartArt in PowerPoint by reading How to use SmartArt to create interesting lists in a PowerPoint presentation. Figure C shows only one fact, but isn't it more fun than the original? To create this slide, I cropped a photograph and used the Remove Background tool (on the contextual Format tab) to create an image that gives the illusion of flight. The presenter might use this slide to expel fear by explaining nocturnal behavior. The slide is a simple, but engaging, hook. I changed the background color to midnight blue, used Chiller font, and selected the following options to set the mood: Without any professional design skills, I was able to create this slide in a few minutes. Once you flip on that creative switch in your brain, it just happens. Is it the best slide ever? No. Will it help you make your point? Yes. It is fun? Yes! Being a little silly is a great way to share an otherwise boring fact, especially when you're working with children (of all ages). The video clip below shows a simple morph technique that's a bit whimsical, but it works. I added the starlight background image via the Format Background options and inserted the ruler and caveman graphics using Online Pictures (see the Insert tab). Then, I morphed the owl between two similar slides. You can learn about this feature by reading How to use PowerPoint 2016's stunning new Morph transition.This feature isn't available in earlier versions. The slides are available in the demonstration file, but the effect won't work. Sometimes simple is best. Figure D's purpose is to connect your human audience to the creatures around them. Most people don't know that owls are common in urban areas and that many end up in sanctuaries and educational centers after a stay at a rehabilitation center for injuries. I applied the Paint Brush artistic effect to the photo—that's it. You don't even need to do that. You aren't limited to one fact per slide. Combining related facts is efficient, and you don't have to sacrifice the fun. Figure E shows three sight-related facts. I used Online Pictures to import the owl graphics and a playful font, AR HERMANN. Text box controls display the facts. If you're racing the clock, you might not have time to turn each fact into a creative slide. That doesn't mean you have to sacrifice your fun theme. Figure F balances time and theme. It requires only a few minutes and the mood is definitely lively. This slide took almost no time at all: Most presentations begin and end with a special slide that sets the mood at the beginning and signals the conclusion at the end. You can use two different slides or the same one—it all depends on the presentation. Figure G could work for either position, or both. I cropped a photograph to an AutoShape—that's part of the cropping feature now. Then, I set the Soft Edges feature to 50% (Format Picture). You can't hear it, but I downloaded an audio file of a great horned owl, and it plays continuously while the slide is present. Because I love owls, the fun theme was easy. You might go a different direction entirely. None of these slides is professional grade, but they represent the potential for visually representing an idea. Owl photos are courtesy of Mindy Rose, a volunteer at the Salato Wildlife Education Center in Frankfort, KY, where all the photographs were taken. You may not reuse them. Owl audio files are courtesy of dl.allaboutbirds.org/evergreen_download-owl-sounds-thank-you. Other graphics are available via creative common licenses through thegraphicsfairy.com, mrsdiscenzasclass .wikispaces.com, kohakuhoshi.deviantart.com, tep546-inthebeginning.wikispaces.com, and huertoescolar.blogspot.com. I answer readers' questions when I can, but there's no guarantee. Don't send files unless requested; initial requests for help that arrive with attached files will be deleted unread. You can send screenshots of your data to help clarify your question. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise when helping readers, nor do I ask for a fee from readers I help. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Slide after slide after slide of bulleted text is boring. If one slide is boring, several more like it won't make things better. You might think you don't have the time or the expertise to make visually interesting slides. But the truth is, you don't need to be a graphic designer or even an expert in PowerPoint to create a good presentation—although you might need a little encouragement and inspiration. In this article, we'll turn a boring list of interesting owl facts into a few fun slides. My hope is to encourage you to explore your own creative abilities. I'm using PowerPoint 2016 on a Windows 10 64-bit system, but most of the techniques are valid in older versions. There's not a step-by-step set of instructions for those versions, but options and property settings are noted. You can download the demonstration .pptx or .ppt file or work with your own bullet points. Note: The .ppt file is limited: SmartArt can be viewed, but you can't edit those slides; the morph effect won't work; the Remove Background tool isn't available; and many of the predefined format and effects aren't available. You should be able to use the 365 browser version to apply most of these techniques. When running the presentation in the browser, the audio bar is visible in the last slide; the hide setting is a desktop-only option. Figure A shows a boring list of bullet points. In no way does this list convey the interesting information it actually represents. Figure B shows three SmartArt examples that add visual interest to the plain text list. The plain list is bad. The SmartArt examples are better, but the visual additions don't reinforce the content. We want to present our owl facts in a meaningful way that will help the audience remember the information we share. With a little work, we can turn this information into a few entertaining slides that support the content and are unforgettable—at least for a while. You can learn more about using SmartArt in PowerPoint by reading How to use SmartArt to create interesting lists in a PowerPoint presentation. Figure C shows only one fact, but isn't it more fun than the original? To create this slide, I cropped a photograph and used the Remove Background tool (on the contextual Format tab) to create an image that gives the illusion of flight. The presenter might use this slide to expel fear by explaining nocturnal behavior. The slide is a simple, but engaging, hook. I changed the background color to midnight blue, used Chiller font, and selected the following options to set the mood: Without any professional design skills, I was able to create this slide in a few minutes. Once you flip on that creative switch in your brain, it just happens. Is it the best slide ever? No. Will it help you make your point? Yes. It is fun? Yes! Being a little silly is a great way to share an otherwise boring fact, especially when you're working with children (of all ages). The video clip below shows a simple morph technique that's a bit whimsical, but it works. I added the starlight background image via the Format Background options and inserted the ruler and caveman graphics using Online Pictures (see the Insert tab). Then, I morphed the owl between two similar slides. You can learn about this feature by reading How to use PowerPoint 2016's stunning new Morph transition.This feature isn't available in earlier versions. The slides are available in the demonstration file, but the effect won't work. Sometimes simple is best. Figure D's purpose is to connect your human audience to the creatures around them. Most people don't know that owls are common in urban areas and that many end up in sanctuaries and educational centers after a stay at a rehabilitation center for injuries. I applied the Paint Brush artistic effect to the photo—that's it. You don't even need to do that. You aren't limited to one fact per slide. Combining related facts is efficient, and you don't have to sacrifice the fun. Figure E shows three sight-related facts. I used Online Pictures to import the owl graphics and a playful font, AR HERMANN. Text box controls display the facts. If you're racing the clock, you might not have time to turn each fact into a creative slide. That doesn't mean you have to sacrifice your fun theme. Figure F balances time and theme. It requires only a few minutes and the mood is definitely lively. This slide took almost no time at all: Most presentations begin and end with a special slide that sets the mood at the beginning and signals the conclusion at the end. You can use two different slides or the same one—it all depends on the presentation. Figure G could work for either position, or both. I cropped a photograph to an AutoShape—that's part of the cropping feature now. Then, I set the Soft Edges feature to 50% (Format Picture). You can't hear it, but I downloaded an audio file of a great horned owl, and it plays continuously while the slide is present. Because I love owls, the fun theme was easy. You might go a different direction entirely. None of these slides is professional grade, but they represent the potential for visually representing an idea. Owl photos are courtesy of Mindy Rose, a volunteer at the Salato Wildlife Education Center in Frankfort, KY, where all the photographs were taken. You may not reuse them. Owl audio files are courtesy of dl.allaboutbirds.org/evergreen_download-owl-sounds-thank-you. Other graphics are available via creative common licenses through thegraphicsfairy.com, mrsdiscenzasclass .wikispaces.com, kohakuhoshi.deviantart.com, tep546-inthebeginning.wikispaces.com, and huertoescolar.blogspot.com. I answer readers' questions when I can, but there's no guarantee. Don't send files unless requested; initial requests for help that arrive with attached files will be deleted unread. You can send screenshots of your data to help clarify your question. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise when helping readers, nor do I ask for a fee from readers I help. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.

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