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Rogosin staff have already been working closely for more than a year with the Brooklyn Borough President's Office, community leadership, Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, Brownsville Multi-Service Family Center, and CAMBA, as well as faith-based, governmental, recreational, and other local leadership to form the Central Brooklyn Health Movement, the purpose of which is to encourage residents to take more responsibility for improving their own health.  Rogosin believes that this approach represents the future of the delivery of health care, and is committed to bringing that future to life now.  Brooklyn is where this can, and should, be happening. The new Linden Boulevard facility offers a 28-station, state-of-the-art kidney dialysis program provided by a staff of dedicated physicians, nurses, technicians, social workers and dietitians. Its Kidney Care and Education Center, working in collaboration and coordination with many other organizations, will provide residents with a community resource for health education and prevention programs, including risk factor identification, screening, nutrition counseling, transplant awareness programs and management of early chronic kidney disease.  Most importantly, the new Center will partner with the people themselves. "This new Center will combine the provision of the very best in kidney care, while focusing also on health promotion, disease prevention, and health education to make a real difference in both the health and quality of life of the people and community with whom we will be working.  We are privileged to be part of the East New York/Brownsville community and to be able to partner not only with the community but also the great organizations already serving the people here.  Together, we can make a great difference for health and life!" commented Barry Smith, President and CEO of Rogosin. "It is vital that Brooklynites have options to seek treatment and preventative information for kidney disease," said Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams. "I applaud The Rogosin Institute for opening up their newest Dialysis and Kidney Care and Education Center in East New York. This facility will provide the local community and others in surrounding neighborhoods with early diagnostics, preventative care, and educational support that are so desperately needed in this part of Brooklyn. East New York is disproportionately affected by kidney disease, and I'm certain The Rogosin Institute will serve as a critical resource for many." The Rogosin Institute Dialysis and Kidney Care and Education Center is located at 2372 Linden Blvd, East New York, Brooklyn with a 13,500 sq. ft. dialysis center. The Center will be fully operational on or about May 22, 2017. About The Rogosin Institute Rogosin is an independent not-for-profit treatment and research center affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH) and Weill Cornell Medicine. It is a Sponsored Member of the NewYork-Presbyterian Regional Hospital Network. Rogosin is one of the nation's leading centers for kidney disease, providing services from early stage disease to more serious problems requiring dialysis and transplantation. The Institute is unique in its combination of the best in clinical care with research into new and better ways to prevent and treat kidney disease, as well as the diseases that contribute to it, such as hypertension, diabetes, and lipid disorders. The Rogosin Institute is committed to produce a unique applicable model for optimal, cost-effective health care and health promotion. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/rogosins-new-dialysis-and-kidney-care--education-center-in-east-new-york-brooklyn-serving-and-working-with-the-community-for-better-health-and-quality-of-life-300454343.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As the commemoration of the Centennial of World War I (2014-19) continues, the National World War I Museum and Memorial serves as a fitting place to honor and recognize the men and women who sacrificed their lives while serving their country during Memorial Day weekend. Additionally, the Museum invites the public to “find your World War I connection” and discover how the Great War affected your family through records, photographs and more with a variety of programs throughout the weekend. Admission to the Museum is free for veterans and active duty military personnel, while admission for the public is half-price all weekend (Friday-Monday, May 26-29). The Museum offers several events during the course of the weekend for people of all ages and interests, including a free public ceremony at 10 a.m. on Memorial Day featuring renowned photographer Michael St Maur Sheil. St Maur Sheil’s exhibitions of contemporary photographs of World War I battlefields have been seen by millions of people across the world and are currently featured in the exhibition Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace: The Doughboys 1917-1918 at the Museum. Half-price admission on Friday is courtesy of Sports Radio 810 WHB. Additional support for Memorial Day Weekend activities is provided by Armed Forces Insurance and the Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund of Kansas City, Mo. WORLD WAR I RESEARCH STATIONS When: All Day, Friday-Sunday, May 26-29 Where: Outside J.C. Nichols Auditorium Lobby What: Find your connection to World War I during Memorial Day weekend through research stations at the Museum. With access to multiple databases including, Fold3.com, Ancestry.com, the Museum’s online collections database, the American Battlefield Monuments Commission and the National Archives, discover how the Great War affected your family through records, photographs and much more. FREE to the public. VIETNAM ERA BELL UH-1 IROQUOIS “HUEY” HELICOPTER DISPLAY When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, May 27 – Monday, May 29 Where: Rectangular Drive at the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: The Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter #243 will provide an iconic Bell UH-1 Iroquois “Huey” helicopter for display. FREE to the public. VINTAGE MILITARY VEHICLE DISPLAY When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, May 27 Where: Southeast Lawn outside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: The Military Vehicle Preservation Association (MVPA) will display nearly 20 vintage military vehicles from World War II, Korean War and Operation Desert Storm. MVPA members will be available to answer questions about their collection. Availability subject to weather. FREE to the public. FIELDS OF BATTLE, LANDS OF PEACE TOURS When: 10:30 a.m. & 3:30 p.m., Saturday-Sunday, May 27-28; 3:30 p.m. Monday, May 29 Where: Tours begin at Guest Services inside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: Join award-winning photojournalist and curator Michael St Maur Sheil on a brief walking tour of the special centennial outdoor exhibition Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace: The Doughboys 1917-1918. Hear the stories behind the incredible contemporary photographs. Book purchase suggested and reservation required. Limited space available. FREE to the public. 2017 BATTLEFIELD TOUR: THE TRIP OF A LIFETIME When: Noon, Saturday, May 27 Where: R.A. Long Education Center What: What’s it like to experience the battlefields of World War I in person? Find out details of the upcoming commemorative journey to breathtaking places in Europe with the National World War I Museum and Memorial and Battlefield Tour guide/photojournalist Michael St Maur Sheil. Museum staff will be on hand to answer questions. FREE with RSVP. HANDS-ON HISTORY When: 2 p.m., Saturday, May 27 Where: Near Paul Sunderland Glass Bridge inside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: History is brought to life during this family-friendly program, where kids of all ages are invited to handle Great War artifacts. 35TH INFANTRY DIVISION BAND CONCERT When: 2 p.m., Saturday, May 27 Where: J.C. Nichols Auditorium inside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: The Museum proudly welcomes the 35th Infantry Division Band for a rousing concert to commemorate those who have served and perished in our country’s armed forces. Comprised of professional musicians, educators, and college students, the 35th ID Band performs for more than 100,000 citizens annually, sharing the Army’s story with the public through music. FREE to the public. BANK OF AMERICA CELEBRATION AT THE STATION When: 3 p.m., Sunday, May 28 (concert begins at 8 p.m.) Where: North Lawn outside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: Kick off your summer with the largest free Memorial Day weekend event in the Midwest. The Kansas City Symphony, led by Music Director Michael Stern, performs patriotic favorites against the backdrop of Kansas City's historic Union Station. Celebration at the Station concludes with a fireworks display over the Liberty Memorial at the National World War I Museum and Memorial. FREE to the public. FINDING YOUR WWI CONNECTION When: 2 p.m., Sunday, May 28 Where: J.C. Nichols Auditorium inside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: Many Americans had family members who served overseas during the Great War. Others had family members who were German or Austrian immigrants affected by U.S. immigration policies during wartime. In this introductory session to WWI research, Dr. Mitch Yockelson will offer some hints and tips on how to go about researching relatives that may have served or been affected during the war. Information on how to request copies of military service files via the National Archives will also be available. Presented in partnership with The National Archives at Kansas City. FREE with RSVP. NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM AND MEMORIAL BENEFIT PANCAKE BREAKFAST When: 9-11 a.m., Monday, May 29 Where: Over There Café, inside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: Enjoy some flapjacks (with hashbrowns and sausage/bacon) in a unique setting during a pancake feed with proceeds benefiting the National World War I Museum and Memorial. The meals are $9 for adults and $5 for children (12 and under) and include a beverage. MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY When: 10-11 a.m., Monday, May 29 Where: Memorial Courtyard outside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: A formal public program to include remarks from dignitaries, including U.S. Missouri Fifth District Representative Emanuel Cleaver, II, Kansas City and Missouri Mayor Sylvester “Sly” James (a former U.S. Marine), a keynote address Michael St Maur Sheil, musical performances from the Heartland Men’s Chorus and the 1st Infantry Division Wood Wind Quintet and an Honor Guard presentation from Ft. Leavenworth. FREE to the public. WALK OF HONOR DEDICATION CEREMONY When: 2 p.m., Monday, May 29 Where: J.C. Nichols Auditorium inside the National World War I Museum and Memorial What: More than 100 new Walk of Honor granite bricks will be dedicated during a special ceremony. Entertainment includes a performance from the Heartland Men’s Chorus, remarks from archivist, military historian and author Dr. Mitch Yockelson and an Honor Guard presentation from Ft. Leavenworth. The Walk of Honor, now more than 10,000 bricks strong, is divided into three sections: bricks dedicated solely to those who served in World War I; bricks dedicated to veterans of any military service; and bricks that honor civilian friends, family or organizations. Walk of Honor bricks are dedicated twice each year during Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies. FREE to the public. MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND HOURS AND PARKING The National World War I Museum and Memorial will be open from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Friday-Sunday and from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Monday. To accommodate expected high Memorial Day weekend attendance, a parking shuttle service will be available Saturday, May 27 and Sunday, May 28 from 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. from the West Yards Garage at Union Station and on Monday, May 29 from 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. About the National World War I Museum and Memorial The National World War I Museum and Memorial is America’s leading institution dedicated to remembering, interpreting and understanding the Great War and its enduring impact on the global community. The Museum holds the most diverse collection of World War I objects and documents in the world and is the second-oldest public museum dedicated to preserving the objects, history and experiences of the war. The Museum takes visitors of all ages on an epic journey through a transformative period and shares deeply personal stories of courage, honor, patriotism and sacrifice. Designated by Congress as America’s official World War I Museum and Memorial and located in downtown Kansas City, Mo., the National World War I Museum and Memorial inspires thought, dialogue and learning to make the experiences of the Great War era meaningful and relevant for present and future generations. To learn more, visit theworldwar.org.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

For her exceptional leadership as a scientist, writer, educator, communicator and advocate of tsunami research and preparedness, the Seismological Society of America (SSA) honors Lori Dengler with the 2017 Frank Press Public Service Award. Dengler, a Professor Emeritus at Humboldt State University, will receive the Press Award at Seismology of the Americas, a joint meeting of the SSA and the Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission (LACSC), to be held 23-26 April 2018 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. "California's level of preparedness for earthquakes and tsunamis, particularly along the north coast that is part of Cascadia, is very much due to [Dengler's] efforts to bring the science to the public, the local, regional, tribal, state and federal officials who must make and support preparations, and the emergency managers who have to deal with the effects of earthquakes and tsunamis," said Peggy Hellweg, operations manager at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory. For more than 30 years, Dengler has been a tireless force in preparing coastal communities in California and around the world for tsunamis. She participated in post-event field teams studying tsunamis in 1998 in Papua New Guinea, 2004 in Indonesia, 2010 Chile and 2011 in Japan, among others, and as a result was a coordinating co-author on the UNESCO-IOC's International Post-Tsunami Survey Field Guide. For the U.S., Dengler served as a member of the group that developed the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program and authored the program's initial Strategic Implementation Plan for Mitigation Projects as the Scientific Lead from California. On the regional level, Dengler was a founding member of the Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group in 1996 to bring together local, state, tribal, and federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations and businesses to reduce and learn more about seismic risks along California's northern coast. "Living on Shaky Ground: How to Survive Earthquakes and Tsunamis in Northern California," a preparedness guide developed by Dengler, has become a model for similar citizen guides throughout California. In 2015, Dengler co-authored The Extraordinary Voyage of Kamome: A Tsunami Boat Comes Home, a bilingual Japanese-English children's book about a small fishing boat that was swept across the Pacific Ocean by the 2011 Japan tsunami and came ashore in Crescent City, California two years later. The book and a surrounding outreach project are the basis of a new school curriculum in California on earthquakes and tsunami preparedness. Dengler received her bachelor's (1968), master's (1973), and Ph.D. (1979) degrees in geophysics from the University of California, Berkeley. She has served as the director of the Humboldt Earthquake Education Center since 1986, was recognized as Humboldt State University's Scholar of the Year in 2008 and was the 2009 recipient of the Alfred E. Alquist Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Earthquake Safety. The Frank Press Public Service Award honors outstanding contributions to the advancement of public safety or public information relating to seismology. This award may be given to any individual, combination of individuals, or organization. The call for nominations for next year's Press award, along with a list of past winners, is available at the Seismological Society of America's website, http://www. . The Seismological Society of America is a scientific society devoted to the advancement of earthquake science. Founded in 1906 in San Francisco, the Society now has members throughout the world representing a variety of technical interests: seismologists and other geophysicists, geologists, engineers, insurers, and policy-makers in preparedness and safety.


Each spring, VVMF works with the Department of Defense to make sure The Wall is accurate. Names are added for those service members who have met the Department of Defense criteria for addition to The Wall, having sustained wounds in Vietnam from which they eventually perished. Those service members who in the last year were returned or accounted for have their statuses changed from MIA to KIA. The names of three American service members have been engraved on the black granite walls of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial over the last week. These additions will bring the total number of names on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial to 58,318 men and women who were killed or who remain missing in action. These three service members will join 58,315 others who lost their lives or remain missing in action as a result of combat in Vietnam: Beside each name on The Wall is a symbol designating status. The diamond symbol denotes confirmed death. The cross represents missing in action. When a service member's remains are returned or accounted for, the diamond is superimposed over the cross. In 2016, five service members who previously were missing were accounted for and those service members will be officially welcomed home at the ceremony. These five service members were accounted for in 2016: The Department of Defense sets the criteria for and makes decisions about whose names are eligible for inscription on The Wall. VVMF pays for the name additions and status changes, and works with the National Park Service to ensure long-term preservation and maintenance of The Wall. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (VVMF) is the nonprofit organization that founded the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (The Wall) in Washington, D.C. in 1982. VVMF continues to lead the way in paying tribute to our nation's Vietnam veterans and their families. VVMF's mission is to honor and preserve the legacy of service in America and educate all generations about the impact of the Vietnam War and era. VVMF is in the fundraising stages to build the Education Center at The Wall. The Center will be an interactive learning facility on the National Mall where our military heroes' stories and sacrifice will never be forgotten. The Education Center will feature the faces and stories of the more than 58,000 men and women on The Wall and honor America's Legacy of Service, including those serving in our nation's armed forces today. Time Warner is the Lead Gift Benefactor in the campaign to build the Education Center at The Wall. To learn more about VVMF and the Education Center at The Wall, visit www.vvmf.org or call 202-393-0090 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/memorial-day-ceremony-at-the-wall-to-honor-americas-service-members-who-have-made-the-ultimate-sacrifice-300458652.html


LeighAnn D'Andrea recalls her Speech & Debate Coach at Sacred Heart as being a profound influence on her life. -- When Sacred Heart alumni LeighAnn D'Andrea received her Air Force Second Lieutenant bars at UMass this past week, it was her former Speech and Debate Coach Daniel Sapir who pinned them on her.D'Andrea was commissioned into the United States Air Force as a 2Lieutenant on May 12, the same day she graduated from the University of Massachusetts with a Bachelor's Degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering. She will delay her entry into the Air Force until 2019, giving her time to complete her Masters' Degree program of studies, which will be in the field of environmental and water resource engineering. She will then join the United States Air Force as a Civil Engineer and will serve for six years.She attributes a lot of her success and career path to her time at Sacred Heart School in Kingston where D'Andrea, a Plymouth resident, graduated in 2013."I joined the Speech and Debate team when I was in the eighth grade," she recalls, saying, "I was very shy and didn't really want to join. But a lot of my friends did join and Dan really encouraged me to join." She said, "He was a great influence on me. He pushed me to take those extra steps, beyond just the Speech & Debate competitions within the department. I entered competitions with the Lions Club, for example, and the VFW. I might not have explored those paths had Dan not encouraged me so strongly."She was, additionally, a Massachusetts State Champion of the Veterans of Foreign Wars-sponsored Voice of Democracy Speech Contest. Students compete in the Voice of Democracy contest by writing and recording a broadcast script on an annual patriotic theme. Her theme was is "Is There Pride in Serving in Our Military?" Local radio station WATD produced the recording for D'Andrea. Her grandfather and mother both served in the Navy."When I look back on my time at Sacred Heart, I remember the science fairs which encouraged me to go into science, and the training I had in Speech & Debate which taught me the communication skills that pointed me in this direction. With all of the encouragement I had from Coach Sapir, I had to ask him to be the one to pin on my bars."Coach Sapir said, "LeighAnn was such an extraordinary student, and someone who we are all so very proud of. What an honor it is for me to be able to participate in this next milestone in her life. She is a wonderful person and a friend to all who know her. We are so pleased for her."Sister Myra Rodgers, President of Sacred Heart School, said, "We congratulate LeighAnn on yet another success in her life. She sets a strong example for all of us and we wish her the very best. We also are pleased to see that our Speech and Debate program has made such an impact on LeighAnn."Sacred Heart School is a private, co-educational Catholic school system, providing educational opportunities for students from preschool through grade 12 in 35 communities throughout southeastern Massachusetts and Cape Cod.  As a sponsored ministry of the Sisters of Divine Providence, Sacred Heart School strives to inspire minds, define character and encourage responsible leadership through a curriculum that prepares students to pursue knowledge throughout their lives.Situated on 100 acres with a present enrollment of 725 students, the Sacred Heart campus encompasses an Early Education Center, Elementary School and High School. The school offers a strong liberal arts curriculum and cutting-edge technology programs in combination with extensive athletic, arts and extra-curricular activities to ensure students a well-rounded education.Founded in 1947, the school has seen many changes since its inception, including the recent construction of a $2 million Science and Innovation Center, upgrades to the Observatory, the addition of a large organic garden, a new robotics program at the kindergarten level and a full complement of beautiful athletic fields and facilities.The campus is in use throughout the year as the site of several vibrant summer programs, including SHIELD (Sacred Heart Interdisciplinary Education Leadership Development), the school's proprietary summer enrichment program and Camp Morningstar, a long-standing recreational camp with sailing, swimming, sports, games and field trips.Sacred Heart is proud of its near 100% college acceptance rate and pleased to offer its students opportunities to participate in internship programs with regional financial and technological firms.Sacred Heart is led by President Sister Myra Rodgers, CDP, who holds Masters degrees in Theology and Music.  Both High School Principal Michael Gill and Early Childhood Center and Elementary School Principal Kim Stoloski hold doctorates in Education.Sacred Heart School welcomes students of all faiths and diverse backgrounds. The school prides itself in a commitment to developing the whole student, offering an independent school atmosphere and top-tier academics. The Sacred Heart campus is located at 251-399 Bishops Highway, Kingston, MA 02364. For additional information about the school, please visit www.sacredheartkingston.com or call 781-585-7511.Photo: Sacred Heart Speech & Debate Coach Dan Sapir (left), is shown with Sacred Heart alumni LeighAnn D'Andrea of Plymouth, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst graduation where she also received her second lieutenant bars.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Las Vegas, NV, April 28, 2017 --( There were 44 different educational sessions offered, each one addressing a multitude of industry issues. But if those sessions weren’t enough, there were also educational opportunities on the show floor via The Roofing Institute and the GAF Education Center; giving attendees plenty of opportunities to deepen their understanding of the industry as well as enjoy themselves. This year’s show has widely been touted as the best in IRE’s 62-year history. Attendance had increased 39% from the year past and the excitement of the participants was palpable throughout the entirety of the show. Show Director, Tracy Garcia, said “this was an amazing show to find leading-edge products, high-level education and numerous networking opportunities.” A representative from Commercial Roofers Inc. said of the show “the sessions were educational, surprising and entertaining. The expo floor was filled with great energy. This was the best IRE show to date.” Michael and Linda always make a point to attend IRE. For them, attending this expo is a crucial part of ensuring that O’LYN Roofing is at the forefront of the industry. “IRE is always a great event,” Michael Olen said about his experience last month. “Getting a chance to discuss best practices and new technologies with other industry experts helps to shape the systems we use at O’LYN. It ensures that we are steering the company in the right direction and are doing what’s best for our customers and employees.” Next year’s International Roofing Expo will be held in New Orleans February 6-8th and after setting the bar so high this year, it will be exciting to see what they do next. Las Vegas, NV, April 28, 2017 --( PR.com )-- O’LYN Roofing announced today that its owners, Michael and Linda Olen, attended the International Roofing Expo (IRE) last month in Las Vegas, Nevada. This was the 62nd Annual IRE and their biggest, most successful one yet! The sold-out show took place from March 1-3, 2017 and drew a record setting attendance of 11,273 roofing professionals. Over its many years, IRE has become a must-attend event for anyone in the roofing industry, commercial and residential alike. The attendance list of the International Roofing Expo reads like a who’s-who of the industry with representatives from 8 of the top roofing and construction companies. The top companies in attendance were: CentiMark, Tecta America, Baker Roofing Co., Nation's Roof, Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Best Contracting Services, Empire Roofing and Titan Roofing. Roofing professionals flock to this expo so that they may stay up-to-date on market trends and technological advances that could potentially change the face of the industry.There were 44 different educational sessions offered, each one addressing a multitude of industry issues. But if those sessions weren’t enough, there were also educational opportunities on the show floor via The Roofing Institute and the GAF Education Center; giving attendees plenty of opportunities to deepen their understanding of the industry as well as enjoy themselves. This year’s show has widely been touted as the best in IRE’s 62-year history. Attendance had increased 39% from the year past and the excitement of the participants was palpable throughout the entirety of the show. Show Director, Tracy Garcia, said “this was an amazing show to find leading-edge products, high-level education and numerous networking opportunities.” A representative from Commercial Roofers Inc. said of the show “the sessions were educational, surprising and entertaining. The expo floor was filled with great energy. This was the best IRE show to date.”Michael and Linda always make a point to attend IRE. For them, attending this expo is a crucial part of ensuring that O’LYN Roofing is at the forefront of the industry. “IRE is always a great event,” Michael Olen said about his experience last month. “Getting a chance to discuss best practices and new technologies with other industry experts helps to shape the systems we use at O’LYN. It ensures that we are steering the company in the right direction and are doing what’s best for our customers and employees.” Next year’s International Roofing Expo will be held in New Orleans February 6-8th and after setting the bar so high this year, it will be exciting to see what they do next. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from O'LYN Roofing


The trees are being planted on the 15-acre Midd-West School District Agricultural Education Center and are intended to buffer the waterway from any impacts from a nearby livestock barn on the property. "Farmers are among the original stewards of our land and water resources, so it's appropriate that these young people who are studying agriculture as part of their education are learning good water and soil stewardship," said Redding. "With more than 33,000 active Pennsylvania's farms located in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, we must balance our commitment to a vibrant agricultural sector with our commitment to water quality." The Midd-West FFA Chapter is a student-run leadership organization of 330 members enrolled in agricultural education courses at Midd-West High School. "The agricultural education program at Midd-West High School is committed to providing the most authentic, yet sustainable learning environments for students," Agricultural Science Instructor David Bittner said. "This includes managing our fields, forests, and waterways just as agricultural producers do every day." Dunn noted that DCNR Bureau of Forestry service foresters located in each of the 20 forest districts statewide can assist landowners with information about planting forest buffers. Forest buffers along stream banks prevent sediments and nutrients from the land from entering the water, and provide shade to help keep water temperatures cooler for trout and other stream life. DCNR's mission is connected to water conservation and quality through: To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/wolf-administration-highlights-stream-buffers-for-role-in-protecting-pennsylvania-water-quality-300442800.html SOURCE Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources; Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

O'LYN Roofing announced today that its owners, Michael and Linda Olen, attended the International Roofing Expo (IRE) last month in Las Vegas, Nevada. This was the 62nd Annual IRE and their biggest, most successful one yet! -- O'LYN Roofing announced today that its owners, Michael and Linda Olen, attended the International Roofing Expo (IRE) last month in Las Vegas, Nevada. This was the 62Annual IRE and their biggest, most successful one yet! The sold-out show took place from March 1-3, 2017 and drew a record setting attendance of 11,273 roofing professionals. Over its many years, IRE has become a must-attend event for anyone in the roofing industry; commercial and residential alike. The attendance list of the International Roofing Expo reads like a who's-who of the industry with representatives from 8 of the top roofing and construction companies. The top companies in attendance were: CentiMark, Tecta America, Baker Roofing Co., Nation's Roof, Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Best Contracting Services, Empire Roofing and Titan Roofing. Roofing professionals flock to this expo so that they may stay up-to-date on market trends and technological advances that could potentially change the face of the industry.There were 44 different educational sessions offered, each one addressing a multitude of industry issues. But if those sessions weren't enough, there were also educational opportunities on the show floor via The Roofing Institute and the GAF Education Center; giving attendees plenty of opportunities to deepen their understanding of the industry as well as enjoy themselves. This year's show has widely been touted as the best in IRE's 62-year history. Attendance had increased 39% from the year past and the excitement of the participants was palpable throughout the entirety of the show. Show Director, Tracy Garcia, said "this was an amazing show to find leading-edge products, high-level education and numerous networking opportunities". A representative from Commercial Roofers Inc. said of the show "the sessions were educational, surprising and entertaining. The expo floor was filled with great energy. This was the best IRE show to date".Michael and Linda always make a point to attend IRE. For them, attending this expo is a crucial part of ensuring that O'LYN Roofing is at the forefront of the industry. "IRE is always a great event" Michael Olen said about his experience last month, "Getting a chance to discuss best practices and new technologies with other industry experts helps to shape the systems we use at O'LYN. It ensures that we are steering the company in the right direction and are doing what's best for our customers and employees". Next year's International Roofing Expo will be held in New Orleans February 6-8and after setting the bar so high this year, it will be exciting to see what they do next.To learn more about the International Roofing Expo, please visit: https://theroofingexpo.com To learn more about O'LYN Roofing, please visit: www.olynroofing.com


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

FORT WORTH, TX, May 04, 2017-- Progressive Rising Phoenix Press is proud to announce the release of BITTER BETRAYAL by Amanda M. Thrasher. They say there are two sides to every story, and somewhere in the middle lies the truth. There's no exception to this one. Impaired decisions, questionable actions, and consequences with irreversible damage destroy the lives of two young teens.High school junior Payton Phillips is dating the boy she knows she's going to spend the rest of her life with: Reece Townsend. An opportunity for the dating teens and their friends to have the night of their lives--an invite to Stacie Wiggin's party--will go down in the books as epic. But when things escalate and emotions run high, the evening of their dreams turns into a nightmare of he said, she said. Who did exactly what that night? As teens tweet, Snap, and play their stories out online, social media threatens to ruin more than the teens' reputations. Relationships, scholarships, and entire families are at stake. Whose side of the story will you choose to believe, his or hers?Bitter Betrayal is a riveting MUST read for teens and parents alike. This book offers an honest and realistic view of the tough choices and situations that can too often destroy a teenager's life. Only through open dialogue can we hope to educate ourselves and prevent such common tragedies from happening. The real topics addressed in this book cannot be ignored and has the potential to save a teenager's life. As a mother of teenagers, a daughter, and a son, I highly recommend Bitter Betrayal. - Lynne Groff, LMSW (Licensed Master Social Worker), Owner Primrose School of N.E. Green OaksBitter Betrayal by Amanda M. Thrasher is a book with a purpose. She aims at educating teenagers about how their idea of "just having fun" can spoil their future. The author, Amanda M. Thrasher, has highlighted one very important problem that follows when teenagers consume alcohol. Being a teenager is difficult enough as it is, but adding alcohol doesn't make it any easier. The book is not just about the aftereffects of consuming alcohol; it also focuses on how it might impact the teenagers and their families. With the social media boom, can any secret remain buried for long? Bitter Betrayal is written in a very impressive style. Payton's conflicting thoughts and inner struggles would seem relatable to every teenage girl who is in love. There are so many emotions to deal with that Payton finds herself mostly overwhelmed. Reece, like any other teenage boy, finds his girlfriend's emotions annoying and irrational. He is, however, not a negative character. He respects Payton's decision to wait until she is ready. He doesn't push her to give in to his desires. There is a lot to learn from this book. I wish that parents would encourage their teenagers to read Bitter Betrayal and learn from it. An impressive plot, excellent story-telling, and smooth development of the story make this very readable. ~ Reviewed by Ankita Shukla for Readers' FavoriteIn Bitter Betrayal by Amanda M. Thrasher, you quickly learn that Payton Phillips is a 16-year-old girl who knows one thing for sure: She loves Reece Townsend, her handsome, intelligent and athletic boyfriend of two years. But that may be her only truth. Before yesterday, she was happy and attending the local high school. She loved hanging out with Aubrey, her BFF, and Doug, Shane, Tristan and Maddie. But then, Stacie Wiggins, the new girl, and Coach Wiggins's daughter, joins their group and everything changes in one night during an "epic" party. Could she have drunk so much that she did something she will regret for the rest of her life or is someone else at fault? I liked the cover of Bitter Betrayal and the pensive girl that aptly depicted the plot. The characters were colorful and complex, and the dialogue was very genuine. The pace was fast for this 310-page work of fiction. As expected, this story dealt with some serious ethical issues and therefore served as a coming-of-age story. I identified with Payton and her love for Reece clouded by confusion. The significance of texting, the use of slang and the socialization of teens, added to the authenticity. The complexity of relationships between the sexes will resonate with readers and keep them turning the page. Stacie's and Sophie's cunning and conspiratorial strategies created the right amount of tension and kept me guessing. Bitter Betrayal is highly recommended. ~ Reviewed by Danita DyessMultiple Award-Winning Author Amanda M. Thrasher was born in England, moved to Texas and resides there still. She is an author of children's books, picture books, middle-grade chapter books, young adult (YA) novels, and a reader's theater written for the Texas Municipal Courts Education Center (DRSR) Driving on the Right Side of the Road program, titled What If . . . A Story of Shattered Lives. She conducts workshops, writes a blog, and contributes to an online magazine. Amanda is a multiple Gold Recipient of the Mom's Choice Awards in YA, General Fiction, and early reader, chapter books. The Mom's Choice Awards (MCA) evaluates products and services created for children, families, and educators. The program is globally recognized for establishing the benchmark of excellence in family-friendly media, products, and services. The organization is based in the United States and has reviewed thousands of entries from more than 55 countries. Around the world, parents, educators, retailers, and members of the media look for the MCA mother-and-child Honoring Excellence seal of approval when selecting quality products and services for children and families.The Greenlee Project, a book about the consequences of bullying and cyberbullying, also won the first place Young Adult Book Award at the 16th annual North Texas Book Festival (NTBF). The NTBF helps schools, public libraries, and literacy programs in North Texas.This title is available for wholesale discount to schools, libraries, non-profits, and retailers. Hard cover available through publisher. Please contact publisher: contact@progressiverisingphoenix.com Also for interviews, media requests or event engagements, contact the publisher.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencemag.org

The beloved novelist and children's author Roald Dahl once wrote an open letter describing how his daughter Olivia suffered from measles when she was 7 years old. Olivia seemed to be recovering, Dahl wrote, and he was sitting on her bed, teaching her how to build animals out of pipe cleaners, when he noticed that she had trouble coordinating her fingers' movements. "‘Are you feeling all right?’ I asked her." "‘I feel all sleepy,’ she said." "In 1 hour she was unconscious. In 12 hours she was dead." That happened in 1962, 1 year before the measles vaccine was developed. The virus had caused Olivia's brain to swell—an often-fatal complication called measles encephalitis. Dahl wrote the letter for the Sandwell Health Authority in the United Kingdom in 1986, hoping it would help persuade parents to vaccinate their children. The letter began circulating again in 2015, when a large measles outbreak that began at Disneyland in Anaheim, California, sickened more than 100 children. Are such emotional stories about the danger of childhood diseases the right way to convince parents wary of vaccines? Yes, says Paul Offit, a pediatrician and head of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. "I think we are compelled by fear more than reason," he argues. "You have to make parents realize that their choice isn't a risk-free choice." No, says Gary Freed, a pediatrician studying public health at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Increasing parents' anxiety may end up making them less likely to immunize their children, he warns. "We have to figure out a way to bring down fear rather than try to fight fear with fear." Welcome to the fraught, complex challenge of trying to get parents to do what's right for their kids. Immunization is generally considered one of the safest and most effective public health strategies. The World Health Organization estimates that vaccines save 2 million to 3 million lives each year. But some parents aren't so sure they want their own children injected. Immunization rates are dropping in many countries, and vaccine-preventable diseases still cause big outbreaks, even in the developed world. Meanwhile, a small but vocal community is spreading misinformation about vaccines and demonizing proponents of immunization. (Google "Paul Offit" and one of the first pictures that comes up is his face with the words "WANTED FOR GENOCIDE.") The question of how to win over parents has spawned a research field of its own, but the studies often have a limited scope, differ in approach, and contradict one another. "It's hard to say how much we actually know," says Cornelia Betsch, a psychologist at the University of Erfurt in Germany who studies vaccination decisions. Still, the work offers some clues on what works, scientists say. And persuasion isn't the only strategy; just making vaccination easier—or harder to refuse—also can have an important impact. When it comes to the Roald Dahl approach, both Freed and Offit can point to research supporting their views. In a 2015 study, researchers split 315 people into three groups. One received information debunking the myth that vaccines cause autism; the second, scientific reading material unrelated to vaccines; and the third, pictures of children suffering from mumps, measles, or rubella, along with a parent's description of a child's illness. In a follow-up questionnaire, the third group viewed vaccines more favorably than before; the others did not. In a 2014 study, Freed also confronted parents with scary pictures and a tragic story. "I would have bet dollars to doughnuts that that would have a positive impact on their decision to vaccinate," he says. But the parents ended up more convinced that the measles vaccine can be dangerous. The material may have just increased parents' overall anxiety level, Freed speculates. Stories about sick children might not work on some parents for several reasons, says Betsch, including a quirk of the human mind called omission bias. People tend to feel that a bad outcome they caused through action is worse than one caused by omission, or doing nothing. In one study, parents rated a vaccination-triggered fever as worse than one caused by illness. That may lead some to reject vaccination, Betsch says: "That way, if something happens it's not their fault, but fate." Still, Betsch believes the Dahl strategy can be useful with some parents, particularly those who skip vaccines more out of convenience than concerns about their safety. When she reanalyzed data from the 2015 paper, she found that only 21 of the 315 participants held antivaccine views. Those people's minds weren't changed; the ones who were convinced were the "fence-sitters," those neither for nor against vaccination. Betsch's conclusion: Forget about hardcore antivaxxers, but focus on those who haven't made up their minds. That group, she says, can be convinced both by highlighting the risks of disease and by correcting misinformation. Choosing where to focus your efforts is important, says Freed, because doctors have limited time to talk to parents. Offit says he can often tell within 30 seconds whether it's worth arguing. If parents are convinced of outrageous claims and think they already know everything, "I just bail," he says. "I know it's not worthwhile." Freed agrees but notes that giving up on hopeless cases can be hard: "These are kids. It's not their fault their parents refuse vaccines." Some researchers have studied the reasons why parents don't vaccinate their kids, in hopes of finding clues to the best strategy. Many parents talk about rumored health risks from immunizations or their negative view of the pharmaceutical industry, for instance, but those may not be the true reasons, says psychologist Stephan Lewandowsky of the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. He says that's a lesson from his work on climate change doubters, whose real driver often isn't their beliefs about the role of carbon dioxide but rather their conservative political views. In a study published in PLOS ONE, Lewandowsky reported that free-market ideology is a strong predictor of antivaccine sentiments; many libertarian parents oppose vaccinations, seeing them as infringing on parents' rights. (Despite popular perceptions, Lewandowsky found little evidence overall of a link between vaccine resistance and left-wing political views.) Understanding the political undercurrent is important, he says, because it can help choose the messenger: "Ideally you would want a bona fide, well-respected conservative who is speaking out in favor of vaccination." Nobody seems willing to take on that role, he adds. Less surprisingly, Lewandowsky also found a "shockingly high" correlation between conspiratorial thinking and vaccine rejection. "It is much higher than for climate change or genetically modified foods," he says. On Infowars, a right-wing website that U.S. President Donald Trump has praised, parents find headlines such as "Most Dangerous Flu Vaccine Ever Being Pushed on the Public" and "Is the UN Using Vaccines to Secretly Sterilize Women All Over the Globe?" Such myths pose a problem to scientists because believers often interpret evidence against a conspiracy theory as further proof of cover-ups, which means attempts to debunk a conspiracy can backfire, Lewandowsky says. Scientists should still make the effort, he adds—not for the conspiracy thinkers, but for everyone else. "Debunking is important because if you don't debunk, then the antivaxxers have talking points," he says. Experience has taught the same lesson to Roel Coutinho, a former director of the Netherlands's national coordination center for infectious diseases in Bilthoven. When the vaccine against human papillomavirus was rolled out in the Netherlands in 2009, a surge of opposition and rumors about serious side effects took Coutinho and others by surprise. "It's like a virus, it's contagious, the message spreads very fast, and if it's already very big, there is not much you can do about it," he says. Authorities have to act fast, he says, by taking even the most bizarre rumors seriously and countering them with facts. "You cannot simply say, ‘This is bullshit,’ even though you sometimes think it is. That doesn't work." Several studies have shown that casting doubt on the credibility of sources of misinformation can help, Lewandowsky says. That's why it's still important to point out that an influential 1998 paper in The Lancet claiming to show a link between autism and vaccines was fraudulent and has been retracted, he says. (Its main author, Andrew Wakefield, was barred from treating patients in the United Kingdom.) "It was such a paradigm case of overt fraud that dismissing Wakefield is relatively easy now, and we have to do that," Lewandowsky says. Another helpful tactic is appealing to consensus among scientists. A 2015 paper in BMC Public Health showed that telling parents that "90% of medical scientists agree that vaccines are safe and that all parents should be required to vaccinate their children" significantly reduced concern about vaccines. (Similar results have been shown for climate change.) That approach has the advantage that it avoids repeating myths in order to debunk them, which some studies suggest can reinforce the myths. Betsch has explored the power of telling parents that their choice could hurt other people's children. As long as enough people are vaccinated, even those who won't or can't get a vaccine—for medical reasons, for instance—are protected in an effect called herd immunity. When too many people refuse a shot, herd immunity breaks down and vulnerable people get sick. That happened with a 6-year-old German girl who died from a rare measles complication last year; she was infected when she was 3 months old, too young to be vaccinated. Betsch's study recruited more than 2000 participants from three Western and three Asian countries. Some were informed about herd immunity, either in a text or through an interactive game, whereas others weren't. All were asked about their intention to vaccinate against a fictional disease afterward. In South Korea, Hong Kong, and Vietnam, an average of 61% said they would get vaccinated, regardless of whether they had learned about herd immunity. In Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States, only 45% of those who weren't told about herd immunity would get the shot; for those who were, that number was 57%. The higher numbers in Asia might be due to the fact that people in collectivist societies adhere to norms more strictly, Betsch says—or perhaps the Asian participants were already aware of the benefits of immunization to the society as a whole. "Whatever the reason, the data shows that an appeal to herd immunity is especially important in individualistic societies," she says. The science of persuasion may be uncertain, but immunization advocates have other approaches to help increase vaccine coverage. "People always talk about the antivaxxers, but there are so many things in the medical system that keep some people from getting immunizations," Betsch says. Some people delay or skip vaccines not because they are opposed to them, but simply because they find it hard to get an appointment at a convenient time. Making vaccinations as convenient as possible can further increase vaccination rates, Betsch says. The opposite is also true. In the United States, parents have to get an exemption—on medical, religious, or philosophical grounds—if they want to send an unvaccinated child to school. According to a recently published study, states where that process is harder had higher vaccination rates. Michigan had a high rate of unvaccinated kids, but in 2015 it began requiring parents to consult with local public health departments to obtain a waiver, and exemptions plummeted by 35%. Other factors are impossible to legislate, or even measure scientifically: the human interactions whenever a doctor meets a hesitant parent. Freed says being forceful is important. For instance, when people say it might be healthier for their kids to have diseases than not, he says he has a firm answer: "There are very few children paralyzed with polio who feel it was healthier for them to get the disease." Offit agrees that doctors need to be more outspoken and proscriptive. His wife runs a private practice and initially wasn't very successful in convincing wary parents, he says. "Then she basically laid it on the line: ‘If you can't do this, I can't see you. I can't stand that your child is at risk like this.’" Many more parents now agree to the shots, Offit says. "I think passion works."

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