Training and Education Center

Willow Street, PA, United States

Training and Education Center

Willow Street, PA, United States
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The Alzheimer's Association reports that although the rate of Alzheimer's disease and dementia in Hispanics is higher than in whites, they are less likely than whites to have a diagnosis of the condition. According to the 2006 Health and Retirement Study (HRS), both African-Americans and Hispanics with cognitive impairment are less likely than whites to say that a doctor has told them they have a "memory-related disease." When they are diagnosed, Hispanics and African-Americans are typically diagnosed in the later stages of the disease, when they are more cognitively and physically impaired – and therefore need more medical care. As a result, both groups use substantially more hospital, physician and home health services – and incur substantially higher costs for those services – than whites with Alzheimer's. The Alzheimer's Association reported that Medicare payments for Hispanics with Alzheimer's and other dementias were 37 percent higher than those for their white counterparts. Genetic factors do not appear to account for the greater prevalence of – or the greater risk for developing – Alzheimer's disease in Hispanics. However, high blood pressure and diabetes are substantial risk factors for Alzheimer's and other dementias among all groups, and diabetes is more prevalent in the Hispanic community. These conditions, among others, may contribute to the greater prevalence of Alzheimer's and dementia. Better management of these conditions – especially if treatment were begun in people who have these conditions in midlife – may help reduce Alzheimer's and dementia risk among Hispanics. To meet the urgent need for education and support in the Hispanic communities, the Alzheimer's Association offers a wealth of Spanish-language courses on the Training and Education Center at www.alz.org/espanol and on www.alz.org. These courses share important information about healthy aging, how to "Know the 10 Signs® - Early Detection Matters", clinical trials, and legal and financial planning tips for families once a diagnosis is confirmed. The Alzheimer's Association also offers free care consultations, both in person and confidentially online, with trained, bilingual social workers who can be reached anytime, day or night at the Helpline 800.272.3900.


The Alzheimer's Association reports that although the rate of Alzheimer's disease and dementia in Hispanics is higher than in whites, they are less likely than whites to have a diagnosis of the condition. According to the 2006 Health and Retirement Study (HRS), both African-Americans and Hispanics with cognitive impairment are less likely than whites to say that a doctor has told them they have a "memory-related disease." When they are diagnosed, Hispanics and African-Americans are typically diagnosed in the later stages of the disease, when they are more cognitively and physically impaired – and therefore need more medical care. As a result, both groups use substantially more hospital, physician and home health services – and incur substantially higher costs for those services – than whites with Alzheimer's. The Alzheimer's Association reported that Medicare payments for Hispanics with Alzheimer's and other dementias were 37 percent higher than those for their white counterparts. Genetic factors do not appear to account for the greater prevalence of – or the greater risk for developing – Alzheimer's disease in Hispanics. However, high blood pressure and diabetes are substantial risk factors for Alzheimer's and other dementias among all groups, and diabetes is more prevalent in the Hispanic community. These conditions, among others, may contribute to the greater prevalence of Alzheimer's and dementia. Better management of these conditions – especially if treatment were begun in people who have these conditions in midlife – may help reduce Alzheimer's and dementia risk among Hispanics. To meet the urgent need for education and support in the Hispanic communities, the Alzheimer's Association offers a wealth of Spanish-language courses on the Training and Education Center at www.alz.org/espanol and on www.alz.org. These courses share important information about healthy aging, how to "Know the 10 Signs® - Early Detection Matters", clinical trials, and legal and financial planning tips for families once a diagnosis is confirmed. The Alzheimer's Association also offers free care consultations, both in person and confidentially online, with trained, bilingual social workers who can be reached anytime, day or night at the Helpline 800.272.3900. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/diverse-and-growing-hispaniclatino-populations-in-new-york-city-share-a-common-risk-alzheimers-disease-300450967.html


Molinaro M.,Philadelphia Connections | Solomon P.,University of Pennsylvania | Mannion E.,Training and Education Center | Cantwell K.,Family Resource Network
American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation | Year: 2012

The support and understanding of families, relatives, friends, and others can be of great importance in the treatment and recovery of people with mental illness (known hereafter as "service participants."). However, behavioral health provider programs vary widely in the extent to which they contact, engage, and utilize these "significant people" (SPs) of behavioral health service participants in productive ways that are also supportive of SPs. Organizations and individuals who provide support and education for participants SPs in the Philadelphia area formed the Family Resource Network (FRN), acquired city funding, and developed a set of specific family involvement (FI) standards for providers. However, even with extensive city support and clear standards, most service providers have been slow to make a policy of contacting all identified SPs designated on signed release forms to elicit their concerns and discuss ways they can help their loved ones in their recovery. The authors review the barriers to implementing the FRN FI standards, and describe a new strategy underway to promote changes in provider FI practices through family involvement pilot projects with provider programs. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Mannion E.,Training and Education Center | Marin R.,University of Pittsburgh | Chapman P.,Millcreek Community Hospital | Real L.,Horizon House | And 5 more authors.
American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation | Year: 2012

Efforts have been made to remove systemic barriers to community psychiatrists proactively collaborating with family members of the people they treat once consent is granted, but progress has been slow. This article summarizes approaches used to accelerate this progress by the Pennsylvania Psychiatric Leadership Council (PPLC), an initiative funded by the Pennsylvania Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services to encourage excellence in public psychiatry. The barriers to family-psychiatrist collaboration targeted by this council include lack of uniformity in family collaboration competencies required for community psychiatrists and lack of incentives in community behavioral health centers. Family inclusion competencies for community psychiatrists endorsed by the state are provided. Steps taken to overcome systemic barriers to family-psychiatrist collaboration by the PPLC's fellowship programs as well as other Pennsylvania coalitions are described and discussed. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Solomon P.,University of Pennsylvania | Molinaro M.,Philadelphia Connections | Mannion E.,Training and Education Center | Cantwell K.,Family Resource Network
American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation | Year: 2012

Despite the evidence that including families, relatives, friends, and other "significant people" (SP) of mental health clients in treatment and recovery services enhances client outcomes, confidentiality concerns and misconceptions by agency staff remain a major barrier to the implementation of family inclusion efforts for adult clients in behavioral health systems nationally and internationally. This article reports on a survey of providers and administrators regarding their beliefs about sharing information with these significant individuals in clients lives in a behavioral health system that is undergoing a system transformation to become more recovery oriented. Furthermore, it describes an agency pilot program that involved clarifying agency confidentiality policies and state regulations or laws, training staff about this information, and assessing the effects of the training. Evaluation results of staff training about these policies are also reported. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Stewart K.F.,University of Nottingham | Fairchild R.M.,Cardiff Metropolitan University | Jones R.J.,University of Cardiff | Hunter L.,University of Cardiff | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry | Year: 2013

Background: Novelty sweets resemble or can be used as toys, are brightly coloured, with striking imagery, and sold at pocket money prices. They encourage regular consumption as packaging can be resealed, leading to prolonged exposure of these high-sugar and low pH products to the oral tissues, risk factors for dental caries and erosion, respectively. Aim: To determine how children conceptualise novelty sweets and their motivations for buying and consuming them. Design: Focus groups conducted using a brief schedule of open-ended questions, supported by novelty sweets used as prompts in the latter stages. Participants were school children (aged 9-10) from purposively selected state primary schools in Cardiff, UK. Results: Key findings related to the routine nature of sweet eating; familiarity with and availability of novelty sweets; parental awareness and control; lack of awareness of health consequences; and the overall appeal of novelty sweets. Conclusions: Parents reported vagueness regarding consumption habits and permissiveness about any limits they set may have diluted the concept of treats. Flexible permissiveness to sweet buying applied to sweets of all kinds. Parents' reported lack of familiarity with novelty sweets combined with their low cost, easy availability, high sugar content, and acidity give cause for concern. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, BSPD and IAPD.

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