Perth, Australia
Perth, Australia

Edith Cowan University is an Australian public university located in Perth, Western Australia. It was named after the first woman to be elected to an Australian Parliament, Edith Cowan, and is the only Australian university named after a woman.ECU is situated in Western Australia, with approximately 20,000 students at undergraduate and postgraduate level, approximately 4000 of whom are international students originating from over 90 countries outside Australia.ECU was granted university status in 1991 and was formed from an amalgamation of teachers' colleges with a history dating back to 1902 when the Claremont Teachers College was established; making ECU the modern descendant of the first institution of higher education in Western Australia.The university offers more than 400 courses across two metropolitan campuses, in Mount Lawley and Joondalup, and a regional campus in the South West, Bunbury, 200 km south of Perth; with some courses also offered for study off-campus . Additionally, the university has partnerships with several education institutions to conduct courses and programs offshore.Divisions of note include the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts , recognised as one of Australia's prestigious performing arts training academies; the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Postgraduate Medicine which offers the largest undergraduate nursing program in WA; and the School of Education which offers the widest range of secondary teaching specialisations within WA. The university is the largest provider of Psychology and Community Studies courses in Western Australia. ECU is also home to the WA Screen Academy. Wikipedia.


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News Article | July 5, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

A 12-metre humpback whale weighing up to 40 tonnes has washed up on the beach near Margaret River prompting a shark warning. The Department of Parks and Wildlife will remove the whale carcass that washed up on Honeycombs beach in Leeuwin-Naturaliste national park in the WA’s south-west. The whale, which is estimated to weigh 30 to 40 tonnes, is likely to have died in the past few days at sea and washed ashore. “Because it is a popular surf location, the decomposing whale could attract sharks to the area, therefore we have decided to remove the animal in the interests of public safety,” Parks and Wildlife Ngari Capes Marine Park co-ordinator Matthew Dasey said. The beach has been closed and people have been urged not to enter the water. The carcass will be taken to a landfill facility. There have been a spate of sharks spotted on Perth’s northern beaches in the last week, including five sharks that were more than three-metres long. Last month, there were two fatal shark attacks off Perth’s coast. Ben Gerring was attacked while surfing near Mandurah and Edith Cowan University nursing and midwifery lecturer Doreen Ann Collyer was mauled while diving 1km off Mindarie, in Perth’s north.


News Article | June 6, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

The second shark victim in West Australian waters within five days has been named as university lecturer Doreen Collyer, as authorities try to catch and shoot the animal believed responsible. Collyer, a lecturer with the school of nursing and midwifery at Perth’s Edith Cowan University, was hailed as a much-loved and respected colleague, mentor and teacher. The 60-year-old was diving about 1km off Mindarie marina in Perth’s north when she was fatally mauled on Sunday, less than a week after surfer Ben Gerring, 29, was attacked by a shark at Gearies break at Falcon, south of the city. Western Australia’s fisheries department said if it caught the shark believed to be responsible for Collyer’s death, it would be shot. Fisheries officers have closed beaches and reset baited drum lines 1km off Mindarie marina, where she was fatally mauled on Sunday. Gerring died on Friday night at Royal Perth hospital with his pregnant fiancee at his side. It was the first time two fatal shark attacks had occurred in Western Australian waters within such a short period of time, the Fisheries metropolitan regional manager, Tony Cappelluti, said on Monday. “From my recollection, we’ve had them maybe months apart but probably never several days apart,” he said. A large shark was caught by baited drum lines on Wednesday, close to the site where Gerring was attacked, then towed further out to sea where it drowned. Cappelluti said any shark caught in the wake of Collyer’s death that fitted the description of the one that attacked her would be shot. “If we catch a shark of the description and the type of shark that we believe may have been responsible – and like the Falcon incident, we believe it is a white shark of at least three metres in length ... then it is highly likely we will take the decision to destroy it in the interest of public safety,” he said. “We have two methods: we can either let it expire on the line or we can use a firearm. In this instance today, we’ll be using a firearm.” Cappelluti said salmon were abundant in Falcon waters when Gerring was surfing, but there were no obvious shark attractants with the latest fatality. The deaths have reignited debate about WA’s policy to catch and kill sharks deemed an imminent threat to public safety. The state premier, Colin Barnett, defended the decision to do so but ruled out a return to permanent drum lines in the water, which was trialled in 2014 but not extended after the Environmental Protection Authority recommended against it. Barnett admitted the program – which resulted in the death of 172 sharks but not a single great white – had been a failure and he was concerned the attacks had damaged WA’s reputation as a tourism destination. “The evidence, some of it anecdotal, seems to be that there are significantly more sharks off our coastline,” he said. “There seems to be more large sharks, particularly great whites, and they seem to be closer to the beaches.” The state government was constantly reviewing shark hazard mitigation strategies, he said, but there was a limit to what it could do to protect the public. The safest approach was to use patrolled beaches, he said. “There’s no doubt, if you swim on the beaches and you swim in controlled areas through surf life saving clubs, you are safe,” he said. “Yes, there’s probably improvements that we could make to have more information more readily available but people have to take some responsibility if they’re going to isolated surfing locations or diving off our coastline.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.76M | Year: 2017

Though security is a field of study capable of diverse applications in daily life, security science is a young discipline requiring larger inter-disciplinary effort. ESSENTIAL seeks to develop security science by addressing two of its main problems: the ad-hoc approach to security research and the growing complexity of the security environment. To do so, ESSENTIAL has set itself two main goals: a) to train inter-disciplinary security experts and professionals, to tackle security threats in a systematic manner and b) to increase societal resilience and security by addressing in an interdisciplinary manner 15 research topics, each associated with long-standing problems in the field of security science ranging from modeling security perception and democratizing intelligence to improving security and privacy in data ecosystems. ESSENTIAL will be the first programme of its kind that aims to jointly educate the next generation of interdisciplinary experts in security science, by uniquely exposing the 15 ESRs to: (1) theoretical knowledge and practical expertise in such areas as: (a) the policing and regulation of information-security technology, and (b) the implementation of policies and legal standards within computing and communication systems; (2) real-world environments in law enforcement, intelligence and industry; (3) strong academic guidance offered by highly qualified supervisors and mentors; (4) high tech research infrastructures; and (5) a diversity of interdisciplinary research events, such as workshops, conferences, summer/winter schools. The ESSENTIAL consortium is built upon long-lasting cooperation relations among leading organizations coming from academia, international and national stakeholders and the private sector, many of whom have over 25 years of experience in contributing directly to national, European and UN technology-related policy making.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2011.6.1-5 | Award Amount: 4.24M | Year: 2012

Convenience and cost-effectiveness are the two key considerations for both citizens and security forces when deciding which technologies to embrace or avoid in the Information Society. State actors and private corporations adopt information communication technologies (ICTs) because they are cost-effective. The motivation for adoption may be different in the private and public sectors but once adopted these ICTs are then capable of being bridged in multiple ways permitting police/security forces to go beyond the data they gather directly but also increasingly tap into data gathered and stored by private corporations. These ICTs, which have to date gone through a period of largely organic growth, will be deemed to be in balance if they are implemented in a way which respects individual privacy while still maximising convenience, profitability, public safety and security. RESPECT seeks to investigate if the current and foreseeable implementation of ICTs in surveillance is indeed in balance and, where a lack of balance may exist or is perceived by citizens not to exist, the project explores options for redressing the balance through a combination of Privacy-Enhancing Technologies and operational approaches. Investigating at least five key sectors not yet tackled by other recent projects researching surveillance (CCTV, database mining and interconnection, on-line social network analysis, RFID & geo-location/sensor devices, financial tracking), RESPECT will also carry out quantitative and qualitative research on citizens awareness and attitudes to surveillance. RESPECT will produce tools that would enable policy makers to understand the socio-cultural as well as the operational and economic impact of surveillance systems. The project will also produce operational guidelines incorporating privacy by design approaches which would enable law enforcement agencies to deploy surveillance systems with lowest privacy risk possible and maximum security gain to citizens.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2010.6.5-2 | Award Amount: 4.19M | Year: 2011

Automated recognition of individuals and/or pre-determined traits or risk factors/criteria lies at the basis, indeed is the very raison dtre, of smart surveillance systems. Yet new EU regulations and specifically those on information sharing between police and security forces explicitly prohibit automated decision-taking regarding individuals unless authorised by a law which also lays down measures to safeguard the data subjects legitimate interests (art 7, CFD 2008/977/JHA). Where are these laws, what can these measures be and what else should the laws contain? Can the laws be technology-neutral but sector specific, thus permitting a measured approach to the appropriateness of smart surveillance technologies in key security applications? Can they be extended to all security applications of smart surveillance, even those not covered by CFD 2008/977/JHA or the proposed directive set to replace it? This project (SMART) addresses these and other questions through a comprehensive approach which combines a technical review of key application areas by sector with a review of existing pertinent legislation to then produce a set of guidelines and a model law compliant with CFD 2008/977/JHA and EU Directive 46/95 and the proposed successor legislation. The project first focuses on one meaning of measures i.e. it uses expertise from police and security forces from inside and outside the EU to measure (as in calculate) risk factors in a number of priority application areas for smart surveillance technologies including border control, crowd-control, counter-terrorism and e-government. Bringing together some of Europes leading experts on data protection with senior police officers responsible for using surveillance in the most CCTV-intensive cities in the world, SMART evaluates the appropriateness and available safeguards for on-line surveillance and associated risks inherent in data-sharing and exchange. Having thus identified appropriate instances of application as well as a number of technical, procedural and legal options for safeguards, the project moves on to create a tool-kit which would be useful to system designers, policy makers and legislative draughtsmen across Europe (and hopefully beyond). At this stage the project turns to a second meaning of measures i.e. it would bring to bear significant EU-wide expertise in data protection legislation in order to prepare a draft model law which would contain a number of measures providing adequate safeguards for the data subject and thus rendering use of smart surveillance compliant with CFD 2008/977/JHA and its proposed successor and other applicable regulations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-5 | Award Amount: 8.58M | Year: 2013

Pain-OMICS is a multidisciplinary consortium of leading clinical, academic and SME researchers in pain and different omics technologies. Genome-wide association studies identified a number of loci associated with pain, but the level of knowledge about underlying mechanisms of different pain syndromes as well as individual variation in the disease course remains inadequate. Pain-OMICS will capitalise on its existing high quality clinical, genetic, biochemical and pharmacological data and biological samples on over 5000 well characterised patients with low-back pain (LBP) and controls available to our EU and US clinical partners. We will exploit novel technological approaches made available through the expertise and global leading position of our analytical partners. These comprise cutting edge genomic, epigenomic, glycomic, and activomic approaches which reflect signal transduction and membrane dynamics. We believe that the inclusion of these complementary analyses will elucidate pathways through which acute LBP fails to resolve and becomes chronic LBP. In addition, these approaches will reveal pathways and biomarkers of chronic pain through which individual differences affects symptoms and response to therapy. Participation of leading clinics on both sides of the Atlantic will enable replication of all finding in at least three independent large cohorts, as well as in prospective study and a large twin cohort. A complex systems biology approach will be used to integrate, interrogate and understand this multidimensional dataset in order to achieve the aims of identifying novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as new targets for therapeutic intervention. The track record of achievement of our partners coupled to participation of research-intensive SMEs is a strong indication that the ambitious work programme will be achieved and provides a framework for rapid translation of research discoveries into solutions for the benefit of large numbers of patients.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.5 | Award Amount: 8.44M | Year: 2013

The aim of the AU2EU project is to implement and demonstrate in a real-life environment an integrated eAuthentication and eAuthorization framework to enable trusted collaborations and delivery of services across different organizational/governmental jurisdictions. Consequently, the project aims at fostering the adoption of security and privacy-by-design technologies in European and global markets. This objective will be achieved by:\n1)\tdesigning a joint eAuthentication and eAuthorization framework for cross-domain and jurisdictional collaborations, supporting different identity/attribute providers and organizational policie,s and guaranteeing privacy, security and trust;\n2)\tadvancing the state-of-the-art by extending the joint eAuthentication and eAuthorization framework with assurance of claims, trust indicators, policy enforcement mechanisms and processing under encryption techniques to address specific security and confidentiality requirements of large distributed infrastructures;\n3)\timplementing the joint eAuthentication and eAuthorization framework as a part of the platform that supports collaborative secure distributed storage, secure data processing and management in the cloud and offline scenarios;\n4)\tdeploying the designed framework and platform in two pilots on bio-security incident management and collaborative services in Australia and on eHealth and Ambient Assisted Living in Europe; and\n5)\tvalidating the practical aspects of the developed platform such as scalability, efficiency, maturity and usability.\nThe aforementioned activities will contribute to the increased trust, security and privacy, which in turn shall lead to the increased adoption of (cloud-based) critical infrastructures and collaborative delivery of services dealing with sensitive data. AU2EU strategically invests in two pilots deploying the existing research results as well as the novel techniques developed in the project to bridge the gap between research and market adoption.\nThe project builds on existing schemes and research results, particularly on the results of the ABC4Trust project as well as the Trust in Digital Life (TDL) initiative (www.trustindigitallife.eu), which initiated this project and will support its objectives by executing aligned activities defined in the TDL strategic research agenda. The project brings together a strong collaboration of leading industry (such as Philips, IBM, NEC, Thales), SMEs (such as Bicore) and research organizations of Europe (such as Eindhoven University of Technology) and Australia (such as CSIRO, Edith Cowan University, RMIT University, University of New South Wales & Macquarie University) as well as the large voluntary welfare association (such as German Red Cross). Consortium is determined to make a sustained long term impact through commercialization, open source & standardization of open composable infrastructure for e-services where privacy and interoperability with existing technologies are guaranteed.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.5-2 | Award Amount: 8.55M | Year: 2012

Inflammatory bowel diseases affect 0.8% of the Europeans, and are associated with high morbidity, definite mortality and an increasing economic burden. Current diagnostic tools and therapeutics for IBD are unsatisfactory. Development of biomarkers allowing insights into pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted therapy is a major unmet need. This programme addresses that need. IBD-BIOM is a multidisciplinary consortium of leading academic and industrial SME researchers in inflammatory bowel disease, genomics, glycomics, glycoproteomics and activomics. Recent genome-wide association studies performed by IBD-BIOM partners have identified nearly 100 genes associated with IBD, but clinical application of these is so far limited. IBD-BIOM will capitalise on its existing high quality clinical, genetic, biochemical and immunological data and biological samples on over 6000 very well characterised IBD patients and controls by exploiting novel technological approaches made available through the expertise and global leading position of IBD-BIOM partners. These comprise cutting edge epigenetic, glycomic, glycoproteomic and activomic approaches which were all previously reported to be associated with inflammation and disturbances to the immune system. The inclusion of these complementary analyses in the diagnostics of IBD should also facilitate elucidation of pathways through which environmental exposures influence IBD risk and progression. A complex systems biology approach will be used to integrate, interrogate and understand this multidimensional dataset to identify novel early diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and new targets for therapeutic intervention. The track record of achievement of IBD-BIOM partners coupled to the central and leading positions of the research-intensive SME partners in IBD-BIOM is a strong indication that the ambitions work programme will be achieved and a framework to facilitate swift conversion of research discoveries into commercial products.


Baker D.G.,Edith Cowan University
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2013

The purpose of this investigation was to observe changes in maximal upper body strength and power across a 10-year period in professional athletes who were experienced resistance trainers. Six professional rugby league players were observed with test data reported according to 2 important training stages in their professional careers. The first stage (1996-1998) monitored the changes as the subjects strived to establish themselves as elite professionals in their sport. The remaining test data are from the latter stage (2000-2006), which is characterized by a longer competition schedule and shorter periods devoted to improving physical preparation. The changes in upper body strength, assessed by the 1 repetition maximum bench press and mean maximum power during bench press throws with various barbell resistances of 40-80 kg, were assessed by effect size (ES) and smallest worthwhile change (SWC) statistics. Large increases in strength and power of approximately 22-23% were reported across the 10-year period, however, only small changes (as determined by ES) in strength or power occurred after year 2000 till 2006. This result of only small changes in strength or power despite ± years of intense resistance training was attributed to × main factors. Key among them are the possible existence of a "strength ceiling" for experienced resistance trainers, the Long-term Athlete Development model, and possibly an inappropriate volume of strength-endurance training from 2004 to 2005. The fact that an SWC in strength and power occurred in the year after the cessation of strength-endurance training suggests that training program manipulation is still an influencing factor in continuing strength and power gains in experienced resistance trainers. © 2013 National Strength and Conditioning Association.


Gardener S.,Edith Cowan University
Translational psychiatry | Year: 2012

The Mediterranean diet (MeDi), due to its correlation with a low morbidity and mortality for many chronic diseases, has been widely recognised as a healthy eating model. We aimed to investigate, in a cross-sectional study, the association between adherence to a MeDi and risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a large, elderly, Australian cohort. Subjects in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Ageing cohort (723 healthy controls (HC), 98 MCI and 149 AD participants) completed the Cancer Council of Victoria Food Frequency Questionnaire. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of AD and MCI status in multinominal logistic regression models that were adjusted for cohort age, sex, country of birth, education, apolipoprotein E genotype, total caloric intake, current smoking status, body mass index, history of diabetes, hypertension, angina, heart attack and stroke. There was a significant difference in adherence to the MeDi between HC and AD subjects (P < 0.001), and in adherence between HC and MCI subjects (P < 0.05). MeDi is associated with change in Mini-Mental State Examination score over an 18-month time period (P < 0.05) in HCs. We conclude that in this Australian cohort, AD and MCI participants had a lower adherence to the MeDi than HC participants.

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