Rosemead, CA, United States
Rosemead, CA, United States

Edison International is a public utility holding company based in Rosemead, California. Its subsidiaries include Southern California Edison, and un-regulated non-utility business assets Edison Energy. Edison's roots trace back to Holt & Knupps, a company founded in 1886 as a provider of street lights in Visalia, California. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ROSEMEAD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Board of Directors of Edison International (NYSE: EIX) today declared a quarterly common stock dividend of $0.5425 per share, payable on July 31, 2017, to shareholders of record on June 30, 2017. Additionally, the Board of Directors of Southern California Edison declared the following dividends: Edison International (NYSE:EIX), through its subsidiaries, is a generator and distributor of electric power, as well as a provider of energy services and technologies, including renewable energy. Headquartered in Rosemead, Calif., Edison International is the parent company of Southern California Edison, one of the nation’s largest electric utilities. Edison International is also the parent company of Edison Energy Group, a portfolio of competitive businesses that provide commercial and industrial customers with energy management and procurement services and distributed solar generation. Edison Energy Group companies are independent from Southern California Edison.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

By almost any metric, California leads the U.S. (and perhaps the world) in the amount of distributed energy resources deployed -- and in the development of a regulatory framework to integrate those resources into the grid. That's why Greentech Media landed in San Francisco last week to explore California's Distributed Energy Future (CDEF) with 300 of our industry colleagues and friends. In the words of GTM Senior VP Shayle Kann, "It's why we're holding this conference here and why it matters so much." Kann noted that almost everything GTM covers revolves around three transformations in the structure of power delivery: CDEF focused mostly on the decentralization piece and the role of distributed energy resources (DERs). A video archive of Shayle's presentation (and the entire CDEF event) is available for GTM Squared members. A highly distilled version of his talk follows. Kann stressed that that this transformation should not be framed as utilities versus decentralization. In fact, utilities are embracing the change and investing at a strong pace -- with $3 billion put into DER companies so far, and $1 billion invested in 2016 alone. Most of these investments go into the "direct customer energy management" bucket. These are technologies and services that are sold directly to residential or commercial customers, such as load control devices, demand response services and energy efficiency measures. "Utilities want to maintain the customer relationship and serve their customers better if they can, so they're investing in direct customer energy management solutions," said Kann. Utilities are also investing in distributed solar. "You've seen a lot of utilities and their affiliates investing in...[and] unregulated subsidiaries of utilities buying distributed solar companies." So far, this has been utility affiliates buying commercial solar developers. "For example, Edison International bought SoCore, and is wrapping it into Edison Energy, their newly formed group to offer a broader suite of customer energy management solutions to large customers." "Duke Energy bought a commercial solar developer. NextEra Energy bought a commercial solar developer. AES just bought a commercial solar developer. So, this is clearly a trend within the U.S. Energy storage is also emerging here as well. If we're going to be putting a bunch of behind-the-meter energy storage on the grid, utilities want to play a role in that." Distributed energy resource management systems, or DERMS, constitute another area in which utilities are making a significant number of investments. Four of the five utility affiliates with the broadest DER portfolios are European. Kann said, "It's worth noting that European utilities are ahead of the game here, relative to North American utilities. Distributed energy is a little bit more mature in Europe than it is in the U.S. Germany was the first big residential solar market, for example. It's got a much longer track record there than the U.S. does." "Solar is not the entirety of distributed energy resources...but I honestly do not think we would be having this conversation if it weren't for the fact that we've had such a boom in distributed solar in the U.S. That acted as...the tip of the spear for a lot of these conversations about dramatic transformation," said GTM's research leader. "2016 was by far a record year for solar in the U.S. We installed almost 15 gigawatts of solar in this country. That's up 95 percent over 2015. So, the market basically doubled year-over-year." Much of this boom was expected, and part of the rush was to earn an expiring federal Investment Tax Credit that ultimately ended being extended. Most of that was utility-scale. "Distributed solar in the U.S. did grow last year. The residential solar market did grow about 19 percent. Commercial solar market actually grew closer to 50 percent. But, it's still dwarfed by how much centralized solar we're putting on the grid. That's probably going to remain true for the next couple of years." But Kann raises this question: "If decarbonization is your primary goal, does that necessarily mean you need a ton of distributed energy?" He suggests, "You might. You might want both. But, as it exists today, most of the decarbonization that's occurring in the U.S., and this is also true globally, is coming from large, centralized renewable energy generation." But despite that, distributed energy is growing pretty fast in the U.S. "California is consistently a leader across technologies. California represents 49 percent of all the distributed solar that's been installed in the U.S. It represents 49 percent of all the distributed storage that's been built in the U.S., it represents 47 percent of all the plug-in electric vehicles in the U.S." California is also a leader in advanced metering infrastructure, smart thermostats and fuel cell deployment. "But, the reason why California is so important in addition to just being a leader is that what happens in California will certainly reverberate through the rest of the country. It's impressive to see how explicitly folks in other states and at the federal level are willing to say that." "Here's an example. Acting FERC Chairman Cheryl LaFleur, in reference to distributed energy resource aggregation, said, "We'll be closely watching California, which now has five DER aggregators signed up. We're figuring out how they integrate them into their market, and can probably learn from that in order to decide how far to go." "This is a FERC commissioner at the federal level basically saying, 'Well, we're going to watch California.' So that places a lot of pressure on what happens in this state. It means if we get it right here, you could imagine [the same model being duplicated] in other parts of the country. If we get it wrong, it might set the rest of the country back." In November the California Public Utilities Commission published its California DER action plan. "It's a super valuable guide if you are getting lost in the weeds of everything that is happening in this transition. It's on the CPUC website, and I highly recommend it to anybody who hasn't checked it out." "The other thing I like about it is that it basically frames all the myriad issues that we're dealing with in three buckets. I think it's a useful frame for the conversations that we're having today. "The first bucket is rates and tariffs. If you're going to be putting a lot more distributed energy on the grid, you have the big question of how you charge customers for electricity. How do you change the rates that have been largely generally flat -- not locational, not time-based? How do you make rates reflect...cost of service? How do you make them enable distributed energy resources to find the places where they will have the most value? And, similarly, tariffs, when you are feeding power back in to the grid from a DER technology, or when you are saving power, or when you are shifting load, how does that get compensated?" He continued, "The second is a bit of a mouthful. It is distribution-grade infrastructure, planning, interconnection and procurement. This one basically says we have one system, or we have historically had one system for thinking about the distribution grid, planning for it, making sure that it remains reliable and operational and trying to do so at least cost." Kann went on: "The third category is wholesale DER market interconnection. Say you fix the other two things -- you still have this opportunity where there's a wholesale market...and you have all these new distributed resources that are very small. They're too small individually to play in this wholesale market, but when aggregated, there's interaction there. They can potentially...be able to drive some value from the wholesale markets. They should also be, in some cases, optimized to when the wholesale market is sending them a signal that there is a need." As Kann acknowledged, "This stuff is really complicated. [...] One way to...show the complexity of all this: That California DER action plan that I mentioned. It's easily the best document that I've read about what's happening in California; it's the simplest, most straightforward thing you can possibly find to see all of the different regulatory activities that are going on. It's 10 pages, which is impressive -- they were able to fit all of that into 10 pages. But the 11th page is an appendix that has a list of 73 acronyms [used in] the first 10 pages. [...] When you have a 10-page document that requires 73 acronyms, that's a sign that the market is pretty complex." "There's another question that relates back to the decarbonization component to this, which is whether distributed energy resources reduce emissions. You might think that they do, and certainly a lot of the DERs that we talk about, they seem like they would inherently reduce emissions. "Energy storage is a good example of this (and this is going to be slightly unfair, so I'll put a big caveat on it, but I just want to use it as an example). In November, there was the first impact evaluation of the Self-Generation Incentive Program in California, which supports energy storage behind the meter. One of the things it looked at is, during the system peak, the times when the system is peaking, the top 100 to 200 hours of the year, are those energy storage systems charging or discharging? "Now in a world where your goal is to reduce emissions, the answer should be obvious. Storage should always be discharging at system peak. What you want to do with energy storage is deploy it at the times when you can reduce peak generation. And that was indeed true for the performance-based incentive projects. But the non-PBI projects, in aggregate, were charging during peak hours on the system, which is exactly the opposite of what you would want if your goal is to reduce emissions using energy storage," he said. This was from "an early wave of projects, 2015 energy storage projects, of which there are very few. In addition to that, it had to do with how the incentive was structured and how demand charges are structured. A lot of these systems are being implemented to reduce customer demand charges. If you don't design the demand charges so that they align well with system peak, then you might end up with a situation where, for the customer, it's more economic to charge during a peak hour despite the fact that it doesn't make sense from a system perspective," he said. Kann continued: "So this isn't to say it's going to continue to be this way for SGIP projects in California, but I do think it's just emblematic of the fact that you need to be thinking about what you're trying to optimize for and then designing each one of these individual programs and acronyms to get to a place where you're achieving the ends that you are trying to reach." "Nowhere else in the country is it as clear that the decentralization trend is real and not going anywhere than in California. It doesn't seem inherently obvious to me that everywhere will go through this transformation, but California certainly will." "There's an interesting contrast between the two states in the U.S. that have taken this transition most seriously, California and New York. New York has this REV initiative that's generated a ton of attention, and California has the acronym soup, and so in some ways, they're heading in the same direction, but I think they've come at it from sort of opposite angles." "New York started with a pretty simple and straightforward vision statement. REV was launched with lots of fanfare, saying, 'Here's what we intend to accomplish out of all this.' Then it spent the past three-plus years trying to implement that vision, and at every step of the way, [they're] discovering more complexity. And so REV keeps getting wider and wider and just running into little roadblocks along the way, and so I think there's actually been a fair bit of frustration. Not to say that REV won't ultimately be successful in New York, but players in the market there are a little bit frustrated with how the process is going today, because it feels like every time they take a step forward, they take another step back." "California's sort of gone the opposite direction. California quietly built up all these individual little components of a distributed energy transformation and then eventually tied it all together into...the cohesive vision that we are building toward within that. It doesn't necessarily mean that California's going to be more successful in that endeavor, but I think in some ways it is a little more positioned for success as a result of having done a lot of the complicated, hard work earlier and then building it up into a bigger picture." The Revolution Will Not be Televised


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

-- Edison International President and CEO Pedro J. Pizarro presented Don Bosco Technical Institute (Bosco Tech) senior Willam Ramos with a 2017 Edison International Scholar award and scholarship on April 10.Ramos, who will begin his studies in chemistry at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (SLO) this fall, was one of 1,200 applicants for the scholarship that is annually awarded to 30 high-achieving high school seniors within Edison's broad service area who plan to pursue STEM degrees at four-year colleges and universities."Edison International congratulates this year's outstanding scholars," said Pizarro. "Through their pursuit of science, technology, engineering and math, we believe these students will make important contributions to our communities and society. We are proud to support them."Ramos, who was surprised and excited to receive the Edison award, is studying Materials Science, Engineering & Technology (MSET). He is a member of the school's award-winning band, a Youth Ministry program leader, and a Bosco Tech Ambassador."William truly epitomizes what a Bosco Tech student is," said Bosco Tech President Xavier Jimenez. "He is an intelligent, inquisitive student who wholeheartedly applies himself to his studies and who appreciates the opportunity to learn. He plans to become a teacher in order to instill in other young people a love of science. We're thrilled that Edison International has recognized William's abilities and potential."Celebrating its sixty second year, Bosco Tech is an all-male Catholic high school that combines a rigorous college-preparatory program with a technology-focused education. The innovative STEM curriculum allows students to exceed university admission requirements while completing extensive integrated coursework in one of five applied science and engineering fields. Each year for the past several years, one hundred percent of the graduating class has earned college acceptances. Visit www.boscotech.edu for more information.Edison International, through its subsidiaries, is a generator and distributor of electric power, as well as a provider of energy services and technologies, including renewable energy. Headquartered in Rosemead, Calif., Edison International is the parent company of Southern California Edison, one of the nation's largest electric utilities.Edison International's support of charitable causes, such as the Edison Scholars Program, is funded entirely by Edison International shareholders;SCE customers' utility bill payments do not fund company donations.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

According to a report in Power Finance & Risk, Goldman Sachs has been retained to help sell Spruce Finance. Sources tell GTM that Spruce has been trying to sell itself for the past three quarters. Rumors about the future of the company and its leadership are rife. Spruce is the product of a merger between Clean Power Finance and Kilowatt Financial and provides financing for residential solar, water conservation and energy efficiency. The two merged companies have raised more than $2 billion. In early 2016, Spruce received $175 million from U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation to finance residential solar. Clean Power Finance's investors have included Edison International, Duke Energy, Google Ventures, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Hennessey Capital, Claremont Creek Ventures and Sand Hill Angels. Kleiner was also an investor in Kilowatt Financial. GTM confirmed that Spruce issued layoffs in February, although the numbers involved were small enough that they didn't require WARN notices. Last week, Spruce told GTM that it has recently raised project and equity financing. Chris Wirth, a spokesperson for Spruce, told GTM today: "As a finance company, we're always raising capital and have an active pipeline. We recently raised equity from existing investors and announced significant project financing raises earlier this year. We’re constantly exploring innovative financing structures to lower the cost of capital for residential solar and home efficiency financing." That's the official line. CEO Nat Kreamer is out of the country and not available for comment. GTM sources have reported receiving resumes from laid-off and active Spruce employees; that CFO Darren Thompson is acting as company president; that solar installer partners are being paid late or not at all; and that there's too much debt for Spruce to service. Sources suggest another round of layoffs will be needed to trim back the business and avoid a fate similar to Sungevity. Years of manic growth have enabled some solar industry players to cover up deficiencies in their products, services or cost stacks. This year's leaner market growth and slimmer margins are exposing the weaknesses of some of the solar industry's leading firms.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Rapid transformation is taking place throughout the electric power industry, and innovation is a key component to delivering the safe, reliable, affordable, and clean energy that our customers need and expect," said EEI President Tom Kuhn. "This year's Edison Award finalists each have created new, original energy solutions, as well as sustainable plans to implement them, and are leading our industry in delivering the energy future our customers want." A panel of former electric company chief executives will select the winners for the 90th annual Edison Award, which will be presented in June at the EEI Annual Convention in Boston. American Electric Power (AEP) – In just five years, AEP engineers created an innovative new transmission line design called the Breakthrough Overhead Line Design (BOLD). BOLD is the most transformational line design in almost 50 years – delivering more capacity and higher efficiency in a compact, aesthetic form. Arizona Public Service Company (APS) – APS's Solar Partner Program has broken new ground in the industry by using advanced grid technologies to enable the continued growth of distributed generation, while developing a business model to make rooftop solar available to customers, regardless of income or credit level. The company placed 10-megawatts of rooftop solar panels on the homes of 1,600 customers, and successfully deployed advanced inverters and developed other technologies to manage power quality and reliability issues. Edison International – Southern California Edison built the world's first battery and natural gas turbine hybrid system at two existing peaker power plant sites in collaboration with its strategic partners. These Hybrid Enhanced Gas Turbines have achieved unprecedented levels of operational flexibility and are capable of responding instantaneously to electric system needs while reducing emissions and operating costs. Westar Energy – Westar Energy developed the world's first mobile and adjustable-voltage transformer in order to enhance energy grid resiliency. This transformer can be moved on ordinary semi-trucks and provides 80-percent coverage of critical transformers on the company's transmission system, with the ability to be in place and in operation in a matter of days. Jamaica Public Service – In 2016, Jamaica Public Service worked closely with both internal and external stakeholders to build consensus and execute on its plan to convert the Bogue Power Station from diesel fuel to liquefied natural gas. This was a milestone achievement for Jamaica, as LNG forms an integral part of the country's fuel diversification strategy, and significantly advances JPS' efforts to lower fuel costs and reduce emissions. Ontario Power Generation (OPG) – Following the closure of the last of its coal generating stations in 2014, OPG made significant investments in 2016 with a series of complex and diverse initiatives in pursuit of a lower carbon future. This included a pumped storage project, a groundbreaking nuclear refurbishment, hydroelectric developments, and Indigenous partnerships. Today, OPG is Ontario's largest low-cost clean power generator. Tohoku Electric Power – Tohoku Electric Power's Shin-Sendai Thermal Power Station was severely damaged following the 2011 earthquake that struck Japan. Since the earthquake, Tohoku Electric Power has invested in plant reconstruction and revitalization and development in the disaster-affected areas. As a result, the company has reduced its fuel costs and emissions, increased efficiency, formulated new disaster countermeasures, and accelerated overall efforts to restore and serve local communities. EEI is the association that represents all U.S. investor-owned electric companies. Our members provide electricity for 220 million Americans, and operate in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. As a whole, the electric power industry supports more than 7 million jobs in communities across the United States. In addition to our U.S. members, EEI has more than 60 international electric companies as International Members, and hundreds of industry suppliers and related organizations as Associate Members. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/eei-announces-finalists-for-2017-edison-award-300449871.html


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ROSEMEAD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Edison International (NYSE:EIX) today reported first quarter 2017 net income of $362 million, or $1.11 per share, compared to $281 million, or $0.86 per share, in the first quarter of 2016. There were no non-core items in the first quarter 2017 results. First quarter 2016 core earnings were $278 million, or $0.85 per share. Southern California Edison's (SCE) first quarter 2017 net income increased by $54 million, or $0.17 per share, from the first quarter 2016 due to an increase in revenue from the escalation mechanism set forth in the 2015 General Rate Case (GRC) decision, lower operation and maintenance expenses, and higher income tax benefits partially offset by higher net financing costs to finance SCE's capital spending program. Edison International Parent and Other’s first quarter 2017 net income increased by $28 million, or $0.08 per share, compared to first quarter 2016. The increase in net income was due to higher core earnings of $30 million, or $0.09 per share, and $2 million, or $0.01 per share, of lower non-core earnings. The higher core earnings were due to higher income tax benefits related to stock option exercises. "Edison International is off to a solid start in 2017, reporting first quarter earnings of $1.11 per share," said Pedro Pizarro, Edison International president and chief executive officer. "It is early in the year, so for now we have left our full year guidance unchanged. Our normal practice is to wait until more of the year has gone by before formally updating guidance. At the same time, we recognize there is a bias toward the upper half of the range." The company reaffirmed its earnings guidance for 2017 as summarized in the following chart. See the presentation accompanying the company’s conference call for further information, including key guidance assumptions. In March 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued a new accounting standard for employee share-based payments. Edison International adopted this accounting standard during the fourth quarter of 2016, effective January 1, 2016. Under this new standard, share-based payments may create a permanent difference between the amount of compensation expense recognized for book and tax purposes. The tax impact of this permanent difference is recognized in earnings in the period it is created. First quarter 2016 earnings were updated to reflect the implementation of the accounting standard for share-based payments effective January 1, 2016. See the First Quarter Reconciliation tables below and the presentation accompanying the company’s conference call for further information. Edison International (NYSE:EIX), through its subsidiaries, is a generator and distributor of electric power, as well as a provider of energy services and technologies, including renewable energy. Headquartered in Rosemead, California, Edison International is the parent company of Southern California Edison, one of the nation’s largest electric utilities. Edison International is also the parent company of Edison Energy Group, a portfolio of competitive businesses that provide commercial and industrial customers with energy management and procurement services and distributed solar generation. Edison Energy Group companies are independent from Southern California Edison. Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures Edison International’s earnings are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles used in the United States and represent the company’s earnings as reported to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Our management uses core earnings and core earnings per share (EPS) internally for financial planning and for analysis of performance of Edison International and Southern California Edison. We also use core earnings and core EPS when communicating with analysts and investors regarding our earnings results to facilitate comparisons of the Company’s performance from period to period. Financial measures referred to as net income, basic EPS, core earnings, or core EPS also apply to the description of earnings or earnings per share. Core earnings and core EPS are non-GAAP financial measures and may not be comparable to those of other companies. Core earnings and core EPS are defined as basic earnings and basic EPS excluding income or loss from discontinued operations and income or loss from significant discrete items that management does not consider representative of ongoing earnings. Basic earnings and losses refer to net income or losses attributable to Edison International shareholders. Core earnings are reconciled to basic earnings in the attached tables. The impact of participating securities (vested awards that earn dividend equivalents that may participate in undistributed earnings with common stock) for the principal operating subsidiary is not material to the principal operating subsidiary’s EPS and is therefore reflected in the results of the Edison International holding company, which is included in Edison International Parent and Other. Statements contained in this release about future performance, including, without limitation, operating results, rate base growth, financial outlook, and other statements that are not purely historical, are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements reflect our current expectations; however, such statements involve risks and uncertainties. Actual results could differ materially from current expectations. Important factors that could cause different results include, but are not limited to the: Other important factors are discussed under the headings “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis” in Edison International’s Form 10-K, most recent Form 10-Q, and other reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which are available on our website: www.edisoninvestor.com. These filings also provide additional information on historical and other factual data contained in this news release. Edison International and SCE also routinely post or provide direct links to presentations, documents, and other information that may be of interest to investors at www.edisoninvestor.com (Events and Presentations) in order to publicly disseminate such information. These forward-looking statements represent our expectations only as of the date of this news release, and Edison International assumes no duty to update them to reflect new information, events or circumstances. Note: Diluted earnings were $1.10 and $0.85 per share for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Proterra, a fast-growing maker of electric buses backed by Silicon Valley venture investors, will begin the first U.S. tests of autonomous driving technology for large transit vehicles in Reno, Nevada, to learn if the system can eventually play a useful role in public transportation. Unlike Bay Area road tests of self-driving cars by Google’s Waymo, and dozens of other players such as GM, Tesla and Uber, in which human drivers sit at the wheel, ready to take control if circumstances are too challenging for the robotic tech, the system designed for Proterra’s Catalyst bus functions as a shadow driver. A human will be in control at all times, as the system created by the University of Nevada, Reno, collects data from laser LiDAR, cameras and other sensors, to build up a “simulation bank for urban usage,” Proterra CEO Ryan Popple told Forbes. “Moving human beings in an urban transit system and moving passengers of all ages and all (Americans with Disabilities Act) requirements, it's way too complex to start trying to carve out situations where autonomy can function on its own,” Popple said. “There isn't any off-the-shelf autonomous bus in a box system.” Just as advocates for self-driving vehicle technology tout its potential to reduce accidents and improve traffic flow in cities, Popple sees similar potential for buses, with one key difference. “It may not remove ever the human operator from these vehicles, but instead end up improving driving safety and accident avoidance.” The first bus in the pilot program will run on a regular route in Reno for the next year, traveling about 100 miles a day as it picks up and drops off passengers. Sensor data will be fed to a simulation engine to create algorithms capable of handling standard road conditions such as plastic bags blowing in front of the bus, traffic cones, bicyclists and pedestrians. Operating in Reno means testing will also occur when the bus has to contend with snow and ice on the road, Popple said. “We need to see a full calendar year of weather,” he said. "We think the technology has the potential to completely eliminate accidents and fatalities, a lot of the more frightening situations within urban mobility… but people need to be grounded realistically in what autonomy can do today and what it cannot." Along with its university partner, the pilot program is backed by Washoe County’s Regional Transportation Commission, Nevada’s Department of Motor Vehicles, the governor’s office and the cities of Reno, Sparks and Carson City, Nev. Privately held Proterra, with financial backing from Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers, Tao Capital Partners, GM Ventures and electric utility Edison International, recently delivered its 100th electric transit bus. Popple expects to triple bus production this year, by boosting capacity at the company’s factory in South Carolina and opening a West Cost plant in suburban Los Angeles this month. Alan Ohnsman covers the intersection of technology, autos and mobility. Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

California may be at the vortex of Earth Day. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is the state's number one goal, which it's working to achieve in a variety of ways, most notably by using more renewable energy. But to hit its green energy target, California will rely on new technologies like energy storage and demand response. In an ideal world, energy storage devices would soak up electricity at night when the cost of power is cheaper and then release it during the day if the wind is not blowing or the sun is not shining. In the real world, the technology is used to keep the electrical grid balanced and to prevent changes in frequency that can cause the lights to flicker out and potentially prompt rolling blackouts. In other words, the batteries detect an imbalance and immediately respond. California is trying to inspire investment in those tools that can inject electrons onto the grid: The California Public Utility Commission is requiring the utilities PG&E, San Diego Gas & Electric and Southern California Edison to collectively buy 1,325 megawatts of energy storage by 2020. To that end, Sempra Energy’s San Diego Gas & Electric has just signed contracts for 83.5 megawatts from five storage projects that use lithium-ion batteries. If approved by the California Public Utilities Commission, the utility will own and operate two of the five facilities that will come online between 2019 and 2021. The utility is on target to procure 165 megawatts of energy storage by 2020. “By building these projects, San Diego Gas & Electric will remain at the forefront of helping the state achieve its bold clean-energy and carbon-emission targets,” says Emily Shults, the company’s vice president for energy procurement. Similarly, Edison International’s Southern California Edison has the Tehachapi Energy Storage Project. It is located on a wind farm about 100 miles north of Los Angeles -- an undertaking that is part of the 2009 federal stimulus plan. The Tehachapi Energy Storage Project is projected to generate 8 megawatts for four full hours, which equates to 32 megawatt/hours. It also uses lithium-ion batteries, which are able to store and to discharge electricity at any time, although they have a limited duration. California is looking to revamp its greenhouse gas emission goals and has proposed a 40% reduction from 1990 levels by 2030. It has several tools in its arsenal to try and achieve that objective, with the increased use of renewables being a key method; it now has a 50% green energy mandate by 2030. “Our research shows considerable near-term potential for stationary energy storage,” McKinsey & Co. said in a report. “One reason for this is that costs are falling and could be $200 per kilowatt-hour in 2020, half today’s price, and $160 per kilowatt-hour or less in 2025.” Longer term and as the technology matures, it sees even greater business opportunities. No doubt, energy storage could add tremendous value in electricity markets. Still, the cost of such technology has limited its deployment. If a project is going to add up to $1 billion, utility executives want to see proof that the investment can be recouped and how that cost will be shared. Utilities are, by nature, conservative organizations that have long-term outlooks. When they build power generation, they are looking out at least 20 years. Energy storage is no different. To make it economically practical, the devices need to serve multiple functions such as injecting electrons to prevent outages or ultimately firming up intermittent renewable power. Energy storage is vital to the success of renewable generation. But so too is demand response. That’s why San Diego Gas & Electric has also just signed a contract to add a 4.5 megawatt demand response program that prompts consumers to shift their energy consumption when electricity prices skyrocket. That is preventing congestion and possibly brownouts during peak usage while also making room for more green electrons. It’s especially valuable if states increase their renewable energy requirements. California’s 50% goal by 2030 is one such challenge. That’s why experts emphasize that it is important to make investments in a modern grid. Such improvements would give utilities the opportunity to communicate with their customers so that they adjust their energy usage. “Through smart communications and quick communications and control, the other generators on the system are adjusting accordingly” to compensate for the variability of renewable power, says Ron Litzinger, president of the Irvine, Calif.-based Edison Energy Group. California has set the national pace when it comes to emissions reductions and renewable energy additions by advancing energy storage and demand response technologies. And while the state’s utilities are asking the hard questions and getting some federal assistance, they are helping to facilitate the movement — something that deserves notice on Earth Day 2017.


Patent
Edison International | Date: 2016-03-10

A control method for controlling the intrusion of dissolved solids into a fresh water aquifer located proximate to an ocean includes the steps of: a) frequently measuring the TDS content at a control location, such frequent measuring of TDS content at the control location being conducted at least about once per calendar quarter, the frequent measuring of TDS content at the control location providing a plurality of control location TDS content values; b) comparing one or more of the plurality of control location TDS content values to a predetermined TDS control range; and c) adjusting the TDS content at the control location to within the predetermined TDS control range by one or more control measures.


Patent
Edison International | Date: 2015-09-02

A system for reducing salt water intrusion into a fresh water aquifer includes: a) generating means for removing brackish water from the aquifer via an brackish water extraction well at a first distance from the ocean; b) removal means for introducing the removed brackish water into a desalination system to generate a first stream of water with a first salt content and a second stream of water having a second salt content, the first salt content being less than the second salt content and less than the salt content of the removed brackish water; and c) introduction means for introducing at least a portion of the first stream of water into the aquifer via a barrier well at a second distance from the ocean, the second distance being greater than the first distance.

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