Edinburgh Center for Neuro Oncology

Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Edinburgh Center for Neuro Oncology

Edinburgh, United Kingdom
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Armstrong T.S.,University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | Grant R.,Edinburgh Center for Neuro Oncology | Gilbert M.R.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Lee J.W.,Brigham and Women's Hospital | Norden A.D.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Neuro-Oncology | Year: 2016

Seizures are a well-recognized symptom of primary brain tumors, and anticonvulsant use is common. This paper provides an overview of epilepsy and the use of anticonvulsants in glioma patients. Overall incidence and mechanisms of epileptogenesis are reviewed. Factors to consider with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including incidence during the disease trajectory and prophylaxis along with considerations in the selection of anticonvulsant use (ie, potential side effects, drug interactions, adverse effects, and impact on survival) are also reviewed. Finally, areas for future research and exploring the pathophysiology and use of AEDs in this population are also discussed. © 2015 The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved.


Kerrigan S.,Edinburgh Center for Neuro Oncology | Grant R.,University of Edinburgh
Medicine (United Kingdom) | Year: 2012

Neurological oncology encompasses the diagnosis and management of primary and metastatic tumours of the nervous system as well as the effects of cancer and cancer treatments on the nervous system. Primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours are graded from grade I to grade IV according to the World Health Organization Classification. High-grade tumours (grades III and IV) benefit from maximal surgical resection and, in general, subsequent treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy is indicated. Median survival is about 14 months although 25% survive for 2 years. Grade II tumours have a median survival of 5-9 years. Systemic cancer can affect the nervous system directly through metastatic disease or indirectly through paraneoplastic neurological syndromes or adverse effects of cancer treatments. The management of primary CNS tumours should be discussed by the neuro-oncology multidisciplinary team and the management of metastatic disease should be discussed by the multidisciplinary team responsible for the primary cancer site. © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd.


McNamara S.,Edinburgh Center for Neuro oncology
Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987) | Year: 2012

This article considers the complexities of caring for patients with primary brain tumours. The incidence, classification and clinical signs and symptoms are outlined. Adult patients experience disabling effects as a result of a brain tumour, which is often accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rates. The various treatment options available are summarised. However, for many patients, there are limited curative treatment options and the main focus is palliative care. The nurse's contribution to care and support of these patients and their families is discussed, with the aim of improving their quality of life.


PubMed | Edinburgh Center for Neuro oncology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987) | Year: 2016

This article considers the complexities of caring for patients with primary brain tumours. The incidence, classification and clinical signs and symptoms are outlined. Adult patients experience disabling effects as a result of a brain tumour, which is often accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rates. The various treatment options available are summarised. However, for many patients, there are limited curative treatment options and the main focus is palliative care. The nurses contribution to care and support of these patients and their families is discussed, with the aim of improving their quality of life.

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