Somerset, NJ, United States

Eden Park Illumination, Inc.

www.edenpark.com
Somerset, NJ, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.96K | Year: 2010

ABSTRACT: EDEN PARK ILLUMINATION, INC. and the University of Illinois have formed a team to pursue the demonstration and commercialization of large arrays of microcavity plasmas capable of producing white light panels with luminous efficacies above 30 lumens/W. This proposed project will demonstrate the ability of arrays of microplasmas to yield flat lamps of high efficiency, luminance, and color rendering index suitable for general lighting. Microplasmas represent a new technology that we expect to be disruptive to the lighting industry because their properties (low temperature and atmospheric pressure operation, specific power loadings of kW/cm3) have no parallel in conventional, macroscopic plasmas. A team comprising leading researchers and engineers from the University of Illinois and Eden Park Illumination will aggressively pursue lamps employing molecular emitters of high radiative efficiency to realize lamps having efficacies of at least 30 lumens/W, and luminance values above 500 lumens. A successful program will have a significant impact on the energy consumption of lighting in the U.S. by providing non-toxic, ballast free, lightweight, and efficient lamps with radiating areas > 200 cm2. BENEFIT: General Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Special Lighting


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.96K | Year: 2010

ABSTRACT: EDEN PARK ILLUMINATION, INC. and the University of Illinois have formed a team to pursue the demonstration and commercialization of large arrays of microcavity plasmas capable of producing white light panels with luminous efficacies above 30 lumens/W. This proposed project will demonstrate the ability of arrays of microplasmas to yield flat lamps of high efficiency, luminance, and color rendering index suitable for general lighting. Microplasmas represent a new technology that we expect to be disruptive to the lighting industry because their properties (low temperature and atmospheric pressure operation, specific power loadings of kW/cm3) have no parallel in conventional, macroscopic plasmas. A team comprising leading researchers and engineers from the University of Illinois and Eden Park Illumination will aggressively pursue lamps employing molecular emitters of high radiative efficiency to realize lamps having efficacies of at least 30 lumens/W, and luminance values above 500 lumens. A successful program will have a significant impact on the energy consumption of lighting in the U.S. by providing non-toxic, ballast free, lightweight, and efficient lamps with radiating areas>200 cm2. BENEFIT: General Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Special Lighting


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2016

There is a present and growing emphasis on reducing or maintaining the wateruse footprint in the energy sector. One of the requirements for effectively managing water is monitoring through reliable, realtime, measurementbased data of water quality/composition within treatment systems and bodies of water associated with power generation facilities. Many existing water quality sensor technologies are expensive, large, difficult to install or deploy, and expensive, which inhibits utilities’ ability to deploy a network of such sensors. What is needed is the development of an integrated water sensor package that is lowcost, rapidlydeployable, wireless, and selfpowered, that can relay realtime relevant insitu water measurements. Ideally, such hardware would simultaneously monitor multiple water quality factors and contaminants at a reduced overall cost. How this problem is being addressed: Sporian proposes to heavily leverage its mature water quality monitoring sensor and sensor system technology/hardware, which includes many of the needed water quality sensor types, and extend the sensing capability of the systems to include heavy metal contamination (RCRA 8s) through the use of Imprinted Polymer (IP) based detection materials/schemes. Done in Phase I: In Phase I Sporian: successfully prepared, optimized, and characterized IP systems for the RCRA heavy metal mercury; evaluated IP film fabrication methodologies; experimentally evaluated/demonstrated IP signaling performance with labscale optical sensor system hardware; developed revised total sensor system hardware and electronics architectures; and worked with industry stakeholders to foster technology transition. Planned for the Phase II project. The Phase II effort will focus on: continued collaboration with industry stakeholders; adding additional sensors for RCRA 8 contaminants utilizing the newly developed IP materials; and realizing and testing (lab and fieldscale) integrated multisensor water quality monitoring systems that meets current and future industry needs. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The proposed technology will support reducing or maintaining the wateruse footprint in the energy sector, providing low cost to deploy, reliable, realtime, measurementbased data for water management. Such a technology will be highly attractive for broad application within energy, industrial/agricultural, and civilian drinking water and wastewater monitoring sectors that require sanitary water for consumption or whose processes affect water and need a sensor to ensure proper contamination monitoring and abatement. Key Words: Water quality, management, sensor, wireless, low cost, deployable, integrated, multisensing, heavy metals, RCRA 8, imprinted polymer.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

For several, widespread dermatologic disorders such as psoriasis and Bowmans disease, no cure currently exists but the irradiation of the affected tissue at specific wavelengths in the ultraviolet UV) is the only known therapeutic treatment that drives the disorder into remission. Furthermore, currently available treatments based on lasers are expensive and access is severely restricted for the millions of patients in the U.S. alone) who suffer from these diseases. Recently, however, microcavity plasma technology developed at Eden Park Illumination EPI) and the University of Illinois has resulted in flat or curved) lamps that are thin and capable of emitting UV at discrete wavelengths. EPI has, for example, commercialized lamps as large as 5 5 161 cm2) in emitting area that generate more than 10 W of average power at 172 nm. These results are well beyond the performance available in the past from lamps emitting in the deep- ultraviolet, and it appears that this technology can be readily modified to operate at other UV wavelengths. EPI, the University of Illinois, and the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital have formed a team to pursue the development, clinical testing, and commercialization of lightweight and compact microplasma lamps that emit at 308 nm. Our focus is providing effective, low cost light sources for the treatment of psoriasis that will allow broader access for patients to treatment at a dramatically reduced cost. Lamps having an emitting area of 4 4 100 cm2) and output of ~20 mW/cm2 will be designed in Phase I of this program and a prototype of the lamp will be constructed. Phase II will focus on the fabrication in a process suitable for mass production), testing, and clinical verification of lamps as large as 12 12.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2015

Eden Park Illumination, Inc. is pursuing the development and commercialization of large arrays of microcavity plasmas capable of generating light in the vacuum ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet wavelength ranges (VUV and UVC espectively), but in a slim and flat form factor. Ultraviolet is well known to be efficient in enabling a number of chemical processes, and is particularly effective for disinfection. The ability of deep UV and VUV radiation to neutralize pathogens (bacteria, viruses, and cysts), drugs (hormone regulators), and organic chemicals of increasing concern in drinking water and water re-use is well-documented. The primary drawbacks of conventional UV light sources, however is their poor form factor and environmental concerns associated with their disposal (because of the use of mercury). Microplasmas are mercury-free, non-equilibrium, low temperature plasma sources and they are characterized by high power loading (several hundreds of 100 kW/cm3) which enables them to excite gases and produce UV- generating excimer molecules efficiently. In addition to their compact (and flat!) form factor, they have other desirable attributes such as instant on-and-off, full dimmability, and low-sensitivity to the ambient temperature, all of which enable them to be efficient in various field applications when compared to their mercury-containing counterparts. In the Phase II program, we have successfully demonstrated flat UV lamps that are scalable (up to 12 12 square inches in surface area at present), flat, and have a slim form factor (total thickness less than ~ 6 mm). Thanks to enhancement of the electric field strength in arrays of microcavities fabricated within the lamp, our lamps reliably produce radiant intensities above 110 mW/cm2, which is the highest value among commercially available lamps at 172 nm. Furthermore, the spatial uniformity of light emission across the lamp is extraordinary (> 90 %). These lamps are currently being evaluated by a number of partners and customers. In parallel with our commercialization efforts, we propose to extend the UV lamp technology to the UVC wavelength range (207, 222 nm and 260 nm, in particular) which currently has the market share in UV industrial and applications. We have already validated the technical feasibility and potential markets for these flat lamps, and it is our intention to develop products and a large-volume manufacturing process to accelerate entry into the marketplace. Ultraviolet light tiles capable of producing tens of mW/cm2 at 207, 222 and 260 nm from various gas emitters and phosphors will be developed, and a product with an active area of 1 square foot at these wavelengths will be commercialized for water treatment and other commercial UV applications (disinfection of surfaces, polymer curing, etc).


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2013

Eden Park Illumination, Inc. performed research for the development and commercialization of lamps comprising large arrays of microcavity plasmas capable of generating light in the UVB and C wavelength ranges in a slim and flat form factor. UV light is an efficient light source for a number of chemical processes and disinfection methods available commercially. It is known to be extremely effective for neutralizing pathogens (bacteria, viruses, cysts) and drugs such as hormone regulators that are of increasing concern in municipal water supplies. The primary drawback of conventional UV light sources is their limited form factor and the environmental concerns regarding the use of mercury. Microplasmas are non-equilibrium, low temperature plasma sources and they have high power loading (several 100 kW/cm3) which enables them to excite gases and form UV-generating excimer molecules efficiently. Additionally, they contain no toxic substances and the microcavity technology enables them to be nearly as efficient as their mercury-containing counterparts. This Phase I program has been focused on leveraging low temperature, microcavity plasma technology developed at the University of Illinois and Eden Park Illumination to realize low temperature UV lamps that are flat and designed to have a scalable, slim form factor (total thickness less than ~5 mm). Each microcavity (having a diameter of a few tens of microns to a few millimeters) was fabricated on a window substrate by various microfabrication technologies, and its electric field distribution was tailored by various electrode geometries to reduce power consumption and efficiently excite Xe gas. Light tiles capable of producing up to 50 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (UVC) from Xe gas were demonstrated with a UV conversion efficiency higher than 20 % in Phase I, and Phase II will develop and demonstrate large scale microcavity UV lamps having areas up to one square foot and their power supplies well matched to the lamp. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: Several other emitters capable of generating photons in various UVB and UVC ranges will be designed and demonstrated for water purification and disinfection.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.21K | Year: 2012

Eden Park Illumination, Inc. will perform research for the development and commercialization of large arrays of microcavity plasmas capable of generating light in the wavelength range of UVB and UVC in a slim and flat form factor. UV light is an efficient light source for a number of chemical processes and disinfection methods available commercially. It is known to be extremely effective for neutralizing pathogens (bacteria, viruses, cysts) and drugs such as hormone regulators that are of increasing concern in municipal water supplies. The primary drawback of conventional UV light sources is their limited form factor and the environmental concerns of their use of mercury. Microplasmas are non-equilibrium, low temperature plasma sources and they have high power loading (several 100 kW/cm3) which enables them to excite gases and form UV generating excimer molecules efficiently. Additionally they contain no toxic substances and the microcavity technology enables them to be nearly as efficient as their mercury-containing counterparts. This Phase I proposal describes leveraging microcavity plasma technology developed at the University of Illinois and Eden Park Illumination to realize low temperature UV flat lamps designed to have a scalable, slim form factor (total thickness less than ~ 4 mm). Each microcavity (having the diameter of a few tens of microns to a few millimeters) will be fabricated on a window substrate by various microfabrication technologies, and its electric field distribution will be tailored by various electrode geometries to reduce the power consumption and generate efficient excitation of emitter gases. UV light tiles capable of producing ~100 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (UVC) from Xe gas will be designed and tested in Phase I, and Phase II will demonstrate several other emitters (molecular) capable of generating photons in various UVB and UVC ranges with active areas as great as one square foot which will be designed and demonstrated for water purification and disinfection.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Drug resistant bacteria such as MRSA and airborne transmitted microbes such as influenza and TB together present major health issues both in the developed and the developing world with major health care and economic consequences Recent research from Columbia University Medical Center demonstrated that single wavelength far UVC photons can kill bacteria and viruses while it cannot penetrate either the human stratum corneum the outer dead cell skin layer nor the ocular cornea nor the corneal tear film layer nor even the cytoplasm of individual human cells In particular the results teste both in vitro and in vivo have shown that several far UVC wavelengths such as and nm are as efficient as conventional mercury containing germicidal UV lamp in inactivating both drug resistant bacteria e g MRSA and viruses e g H N but these two far UVC wavelengths induce no damage to skin or to eyes for a wide range of clinical endpoints in contrast to a conventional broad spectrum germicidal lamp In this program the team of Columbia University and Eden Park Illumination propose a novel efficient disinfection tool which can be scalable and affordable The team will develop uniform and flat lamps having anti microbial advantages over conventional cylindrical UV lamps but without the safety hazards Eden Park have commercialized a new generation of UV light tiles with a patented microcavity plasma technology producing lamps with a scalable slim form factor for uniformly treating large surfaces Based on confinement of low temperature plasma within large arrays of microcavities this technology is ideally suited for the efficient inexpensive production of excimer based nm UV lamp The technology of a monochromatic excimer lamp emitting nm UV radiation will have two initial applications reducing surgical site infections in which nm photons will continuously illuminate the wound during surgery and minimizing airborne transmission of microbes such as TB and influenza in which whole room illumination will be used Both have been successfully demonstrated with conventional germicidal lamps but widespread use has been limited due to the associated health hazards of conventional lamps The Phase I Project Aims are first to design and develop nm microplasma UV flat lamp optimized for this germicidal application and second to use the lamp to demonstrate effective germicidal properties The first Aim will involve design and optimization of a microplasma based monochromatic far UVC flat lamp optimized for germicidal applications with the milestone of a nm flat UV lamp without higher wavelength andquot contaminantsandquot and with a lamp structure and gas mixture optimized for long lifetime The second Aim is to demonstrate the efficacy of this nm microplasma flat lamp for anti bacterial efficiency in an in vivo wound model and for anti viral efficiency in an airborne aerosol model The milestones here are to demonstrate appropriate levels of MRSA killing in a murine model of surgical site infection and appropriate levels of H N influenza virus killing in an airborne aerosol model PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Drug resistant bacteria such as MRSA and airborne transmitted microbes such as influenza and TB present major health issues both in the developed and the developing world with major human and economic consequences UV from a standard germicidal lamp is a highly efficient anti microbial modality effective both against bacteria and viruses but is not practical for use where people are present because it is a human health hazard being both carcinogenic and cataractogenic Based on biophysical principles and supported by preliminary studies it is proposed that an optimized far UVC light nm from an inexpensive excimer lamp will not produce these health hazards but will have all the anti microbial advantages of UV germicidal lamps both for drug resistant bacteria to reduce surgical site infection and for viruses to reduce airborne transmission


News Article | September 6, 2014
Site: tech.co

Energy efficient products ensure that our future is foreseeable. With lighting, we have LED and CFL light bulbs. Still, these bulbs burn out and waste space. How about a ultra-thin and longer lasting light source? Thanks to Eden Park Illumination, we now have Microplasma Lighting – a new product that consists of micro scale devices which emit light using a plasma discharge, and involves arranging microplasmas in large arrays. Plus, the lighting can be any shape or color. “By successfully confining plasmas in arrays of microcavities, researchers and engineers have realized light-emitting sheets that are thin and inexpensive, and hold considerable promise as the next generation of lighting technology.” – Gary Eden, Co-founder of Eden Park Illumination. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Professors Gary Eden and Sung-Jin Park founded Eden Park Illumination Inc. in May of 2007. Eden Park Illumination was founded to develop and commercialize Microplasma products. In 2009, Eden Park Illumination was named by Red Herring as one of the most promising technology startups in North America. Get ready to see lighting on a whole new level this coming Tuesday September 7th at TECH cocktail Champaign. Be sure to register and get your chance at viewing one of the “brightest” new technologies. 😉

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