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Patent
Neogen Corporation and Eden Inc | Date: 2017-03-29

A preservative efficacy test for determining efficiency of at least one preservative material that is present in a consumable product to reduce or eliminate living microorganisms that includes challenging the preservative material with at least one microorganism derived from a pure culture by inoculating a sample of the product with a quantity of at least one challenge microorganism and allowing the microorganisms to grow for an predetermined interval after which the preservative is neutralized and a portion of the resulting sample is cultured in a testing system that includes at least one testing container, wherein the testing container contains liquid growth media and sensor means capable of monitoring microorganism growth by sensing the metabolic by-products generated by growth of microorganisms present in the liquid growth media and producing an output signal that can be measured and analyzed.


News Article | June 21, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - Jun 21, 2017) - Eden, the leading platform for office managers to secure office cleaning, office moving, handyman services, and other facilities services announced today that it has expanded its presence beyond the Bay Area to Los Angeles and Austin. Effective today, office managers in all three cities can manage all office services they need from one dashboard at www.eden.io. Eden launched in San Francisco in 2015, and has quickly become the marketplace of choice for busy office managers who need to arrange office cleaning, office moving, handyman, administrative services, snacks and supplies, and other office services. One client that uses Eden in Los Angeles is Headspace, creator of the most popular meditation app. Headspace employs 150 at its LA headquarters, and office manager Linda Isra uses Eden. "Eden has been extremely helpful in providing our team and the workplace with the resources we need to make the office run smoothly," said Isra. "With the help of our dedicated account manager, they're able to deliver a high-quality standard through a wide range of services they offer." Moving company You Move Me is one of the hundreds of vendors participating in the Eden marketplace, initially in San Francisco and now also in LA and Austin. "Participating in the Eden office services marketplaces has helped us grow our business in San Francisco by 10-15 percent, and we expect a similar boost in LA and Austin," said Ulises Alcocer, General Manager at You Move Me. "Eden has provided us with a steady stream of high-quality business. Tons of fast-growing businesses, including technology companies, use Eden, so they have given our relatively low-tech business great access to the booming tech economy. We're excited to continue working with Eden as it expands nationally." Eden CEO Joe Du Bey said, "Eden's platform to solve all on-site needs has proven to be very popular with our clients in the Bay Area, and feedback from beta customers in LA and Austin has also been very positive." Office managers can find many different services on the Eden marketplace, both recurring and on-demand, including: To learn more about Eden or to book service, visit https://www.eden.io/. About Eden Eden is the best platform for office managers to find all the on-site services they need, including office cleaning, office moving, handyman services and IT support. With hundreds of service provider listings, Eden delivers reliable, convenient, high-quality services -- making office managers lives much easier. Based in San Francisco, Eden is venture backed and growing rapidly. Learn more at www.eden.io.


Babcock D.E.,Eden Inc | Hergenrother R.W.,Eden Inc | Craig D.A.,SynecorLabs LLC | Kolodgie F.D.,CVPath Institute Inc. | Virmani R.,CVPath Institute Inc.
Biomaterials | Year: 2013

Most catheter-based vascular medical devices today have hydrophilic lubricious coatings. This study was designed to perform a territory-based downstream analysis of end organs subsequent to angioplasty with coated balloon catheters to better understand the potential in vivo physiological consequence of coating wear materials. Coronary angioplasty was performed on swine using balloon catheters modified with two polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-based coatings of similar lubricity, but different levels of particulates (5-fold) when tested in a tortuous path model. Myocardial tissues examined 28 days post-angioplasty revealed no visible particulates in the animals treated with the lower particulate catheters while 3 of 40 sections from higher particulate catheters contained amorphous foreign material, and 1 of 40 sections from tissue treated with uncoated catheters had amorphous foreign material. Non-target organs and downstream muscle revealed no particulates for any of the treatments. Histological analysis showed that the overall number of vessels with embolic foreign material was low and evidence of myocyte necrosis was rare with either of the coatings investigated in this study. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


A new device and method for detecting the presence of living microorganisms in test samples are described. The device comprises a container with at least one section transparent to light, a growth zone located in said container containing a mixture of growth media capable of supporting growth of the microorganisms, and at least one indicator substrate that changes its optical properties due to growth of the microorganisms. A detection zone is located in the container adjacent to the transparent section, and a barrier layer comprising porous solid material separates the two zones, allowing diffusion of molecules and ions of metabolic by-products of the organisms, while preventing microorganisms and particulate matter of the test sample from penetrating into the detection zone.


Trademark
Eden Inc | Date: 2016-07-18

instant miso soup. muesli.


Trademark
Eden Inc | Date: 2016-07-18

instant miso soup.


News Article | July 14, 2015
Site: techcrunch.com

Eden, the YC-backed startup that offers on-demand tech help service direct to your home, has today announced the raise of $1.3 million in seed funding. Investors include Canvas Ventures, Eniac Ventures, Comcast Ventures, Maven Ventures, Y Combinator, Dylan Smith from Box, and James Beshara from Tilt (with his first angel investment). The premise behind Eden is relatively simple. Users with tech problems, whether it’s a broken phone, faulty WiFi, an un-installable printer (which we’ve all encountered) or otherwise can hit up the Eden website on their phone or desktop and have a tech specialist at their house, their office or a coffee shop at a specified time. Eden says there are more than 180,000 tech pros in the United States who are either working at Geek Squad (the incumbent) or for a small tech shop, and the company wants to tap that supply of professionals to offer a better level of service to customers who don’t have the time to go visit a shop and wait. Eden cofounder Joe Du Bey said that in these first few weeks — for reference, Eden launched in the Bay Area in March of 2015 — the service is seeing high demand from folks over the age of 50 who have usually depended on millennial relatives to help with their tech frustrations. As it stands now, Eden’s tech pros are 1099 contractors but Du Bey says that the company is ultra-flexible when it comes to how they employ their workers. “The way that I’m approaching this is to do whatever gives our customers a better experience,” said Du Bey. “No final decision has been made, and moving our workers over to W2 is something we’re seriously considering.” This comes at a time where the debate over 1099 vs. W2 employment is truly heating up, with Hilary Clinton weighing in and companies like Shyp and Instacart revamping their models to turn contractors into full employees. And let’s not forget the recent Uber lawsuit, that forced the transportation startup to classify at least one of its drivers as an employee. For now, Eden is available in the Bay Area and can offer same-day service to users, but eventually the company wants to tighten that to a shorter window. But growing a marketplace, which is exactly what Eden is, can be difficult when both sides of the service have to grow at the same rate. “The greatest challenge of the business right now is the supply side,” said Du Bey. “We are an on-demand business, and when you’re growing quickly on the demand side it’s tough to ensure you’re doing the right kind of recruiting. We have a more drawn-out recruiting process that is very rigorous, so the supply side constraint is currently the biggest challenge for us.” Eden charges $69/hour, giving away a free first hour to new customers, and that includes everything from installing a Nest thermostat to mounting a TV to fixing a cracked iPhone screen. You can learn more about the newly funded Eden right here.


News Article | July 14, 2015
Site: www.siliconbeat.com

With more screens and mobile devices filling households, the more chances for  frustrations when gadgets don’t work as they should. And when powering off and on again, and perhaps giving the TV or laptop a good whack doesn’t fix the problem — enter Eden. The San Francisco company, a scrappy upstart launched in May, will swoop into your home to solve your tech conundrums. And on Tuesday, Eden announced it raised $1.3 million from investors, including Y Combinator, Comcast Ventures, Maven Ventures, Canvas Venture Fund and Dylan Smith, Box’s co-founder. “We took little pieces from a lot of people,” said Joe Du Bey, Eden co-founder and CEO. The business model was pioneered by Geek Squad, Best Buy’s tech support subsidiary that makes home visits to repair and install technology. Du Bey said that service is too slow, too costly and often short-changes customers on solutions. “People want their homes to be a place where everything works,” he said. Geek Squad in San Francisco has a two-star rating on Yelp; Eden has a five-star rating, although it obviously has served many fewer customers. Eden charges $69 per hour; Geek Squad, which has been in business about 20 years, tends to cost a few hundred dollars for a tech repair. Eden markets to a lot of baby boomers — consumers who buy technology but are limited in their abilities to fix problems when they arise. Investors estimate the on-demand tech repair market is worth $30 billion. Du Bey says that figure doesn’t account for all the people who need tech help but haven’t used a service yet, because, until now, they’ve been too expensive and inefficient. “There is a ton of pent-up demand if you can just make the market work efficiently,” he said. “The market is way understated.” Du Bey said Eden has six employees and is on track to hire another four by the end of the month. It has about 25 contractor workers who are dispatched to homes and businesses on-demand to attend to tech problems; they make $30 per hour. Eden is currently enrolled in Y Combinator, a Mountain View tech accelerator.


News Article | August 3, 2015
Site: techcrunch.com

Back in May, Eden launched out of the Y Combinator accelerator to provide users with on-demand tech help, whether it’s fixing a cracked iPhone screen, solving Wi-Fi issues, installing a printer or mounting a new TV. The startup has seen steady growth, and since raised $1.3 million in seed funding, but thus far the company has been using 1099 contractors to deliver Eden tech help service. Today, co-founder Joe du Bey has announced that Eden will be shifting its workforce from 1099 to W2, hiring some contractors as full-time employees and others as part-time employees, with some even getting equity in the company. The conversation around 1099 vs. W2 has been heating up, catalyzed partially by various lawsuits against on-demand companies such as Uber, Homejoy and Handy. In short, Eden previously hired tech pros who work at big box retailers (Best Buy) or in small tech shops to pick up work for $30/hour as contractors. However, du Bey says that, since Eden Tech Wizards come into the home and help with sensitive problems, it’s important that they go through some form of customer happiness training. “At Eden we’ve always prioritized people in the same way: customers, tech wizards, HQ, and everyone else,” said Du Bey. “By switching over to W2 employees, we’re ensuring that the customer gets the best experience possible and that we’re taking good care of our tech wizards.” While 1099 contractors enjoy a level of flexibility in their job, they’re also responsible for themselves in most respects, having to pay their medicare and social security taxes, handling healthcare and insurance, etc. Hiring 1099 contractors also takes a lot of control away from the company, as a 1099 classification generally limits the amount of training employees receive, control over dress code, and/or guidelines that can be set over the way they do their jobs. Du Bey tells TechCrunch that a good portion of Eden’s business comes from people aged 50 or older, with Eden replacing help usually provided by younger relatives. “If you ordered an Eden for your parent or grandparent, these are precious people. You’d want to know that someone reliable and helpful and patient was coming into their home and helping your loved one,” said Du Bey. “We put our tech wizards through a lot of training to determine if they can not only be effective but be pleasant to have in the home.” In general, the switch will cost Eden about 20 percent more to move over contractors to W2, Du Bey says. Eden costs $69/hour for users and currently serves the Bay Area.

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