Fairfield, OH, United States

ECOSIL Technologies LLC

www.ecosiltech.com
Fairfield, OH, United States

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Xue D.,University of Cincinnati | Xue D.,ECOSIL Technologies LLC | Van Ooij W.J.,University of Cincinnati | Van Ooij W.J.,ECOSIL Technologies LLC
Progress in Organic Coatings | Year: 2013

A water-based epoxy-resin-ester modified bis-[tri-ethoxy-silyl] ethane (BTSE) organosilane coated by electro-deposition was tried on hot-dipped galvanized (HDG) steel for corrosion protection. Various resin ratios were tested with different electro-deposition cathodic currents. FTIR showed a more cross-linked siloxane network (SiOSi) by electro-deposition than by immersion. AFM, SEM, EDX examined the morphology and interface between the coating and substrate. Performance tests of salt spray test (SST), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization showed the corrosion resistance of BTSE-resin film was dramatically increased by electro-deposition. A corrosion protection morphology was proposed according to the results in this work. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Doepke A.,University of Cincinnati | Xue D.,University of Cincinnati | Yun Y.,North Carolina A&T State University | Vanooij W.J.,ECOSIL Technologies LLC | And 2 more authors.
Electrochimica Acta | Year: 2012

Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open circuit potential and pH changes were used to examine the corrosion of magnesium 4 yttrium alloy (Mg4Y) with and without a silane-epoxy-coating (SEC) in a stirred 0.154 M NaCl solution at 37 °C. For a good quality SEC we find a relatively low non-Faradaic resistance of 266 Ω cm 2. The quality of the SEC was affected by the curing temperature. In this article we compare the electrochemical measurements taken during corrosion of bare Mg4Y, Mg4Y with a SEC that remained intact, and a SEC that did not protect the Mg from corrosion. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 710.22K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to develop a chromate- and phosphate-free metal surface pre-treatment product that reduces cost, and provides significant environmental and health benefits. Iron and zinc phosphate chemicals are currently widely used in surface treatment processes, which require from 7 to 10 process steps, consume energy to heat treatment baths, and produce a large quantity of waste that must be treated. This adds cost, and results in phosphate discharge to the environment. Based on the Phase I project, a chromate- and phosphate-free pre-treatment chemical will be further developed in this project. This chemical reduces the number of pre-treatment process to less than 5 steps, can be used at ambient temperature, and produces 90% less waste. It is expected to demonstrate enhanced performance in corrosion protection and paint adhesion over similar products.

The broader commercial impacts of this project will be to dramatically reduce cost, complexity and negative environmental impact of metal surface pretreatment in manufacturing processes without compromising performance. Potential applications will be in automobile, aerospace, steel (coil coatings), consumer electronics, appliance, and many other industries. An important societal impact will be the better protection to workers in plants, as this process is not toxic and does not require elaborate waste disposal procedures. This project will also enhance the scientific understanding of mechanisms by which pretreatments contribute to the protection of metals.


Patent
University of Cincinnati and ECOSIL Technologies LLC | Date: 2010-07-27

Compositions and methods for treating metal substrates and/or bonding metal substrates to polymeric materials, such as rubber, are provided. The compositions include at least one substantially hydrolyzed amino silane and at least one substantially hydrolyzed sulfur-containing silane Optionally, the compositions include a nano-size particulate material. The compositions provide coatings on metal substrates for protecting the metal from corrosion and for adhering rubber-like polymeric compositions to the metal with polymer-to-metal vulcanization conditions less dependent on the coating thickness, and with use of less coating materials.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 169.25K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a pre-paint treatment product without using chromates and phosphates for applications in metal-finishing industries. Chromates and phosphates are still widely used in pre-paint treatments, but are environmentally undesirable. Replacements have been proposed and implemented, e.g., in the coil coating industry, but such systems are less robust and require tighter control of processing conditions. Other systems, such as silanes, need to dry and cure prior to painting. Such treatments cannot be used under a cathodic electrocoated paint. In this project, a product that can be electrocoated within 2 minutes after the pretreatment will be developed. The performance is expected to be as well as chromates or phosphates on a range of different metals. The interactions between silanes and the additions, as well as the structure and properties of the films will be studied. The anticipated results will be a number of environmentally-compliant metal pretreatments that can be electrocoated.

The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to eliminate chromates and phosphates in pre-paint treatments without the loss of performance. The potential applications will be in automotive manufacturing, aerospace, steel industry (coil coatings), consumer electronics, appliance industry and many other industries where electrocoating is used for painting. An important societal impact will be the better protection to workers in plants, as this process is not toxic and will not require elaborate waste disposal procedures. This project will also enhance the scientific understanding of the mechanisms by which pretreatments contribute to the protection of metals.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.50K | Year: 2014

The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of novel surface preparation methods that are easier to apply on metal substrates in various field environments while still enhancing the corrosion protective performance of topcoats. This is made possible by the characteristics of a patented pretreatment technology developed at Ecosil that can be spray or immersion applied. This novel pretreatment utilizes special silanes and water-soluble inorganic compounds to form a nano-structured hybrid pretreatment coating that can greatly enhance the paint adhesion of metal substrates. In addition, the hybrid pretreatment is compatible with both water and organic solvents. In this proposed work, we will make use of this unique characteristic to mix the pretreatment solution with cleaning agents such as water and organic solvents to form 2-in-1 cleaning-pretreatment systems. This effort would significantly simplify standard multi-step surface preparation procedures, and would make the surface preparation more field-friendly. Approved for Public Release 14-MDA-7979 (16 September14).


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.25K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a pre-paint treatment product without using chromates and phosphates for applications in metal-finishing industries. Chromates and phosphates are still widely used in pre-paint treatments, but are environmentally undesirable. Replacements have been proposed and implemented, e.g., in the coil coating industry, but such systems are less robust and require tighter control of processing conditions. Other systems, such as silanes, need to dry and cure prior to painting. Such treatments cannot be used under a cathodic electrocoated paint. In this project, a product that can be electrocoated within 2 minutes after the pretreatment will be developed. The performance is expected to be as well as chromates or phosphates on a range of different metals. The interactions between silanes and the additions, as well as the structure and properties of the films will be studied. The anticipated results will be a number of environmentally-compliant metal pretreatments that can be electrocoated. The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to eliminate chromates and phosphates in pre-paint treatments without the loss of performance. The potential applications will be in automotive manufacturing, aerospace, steel industry (coil coatings), consumer electronics, appliance industry and many other industries where electrocoating is used for painting. An important societal impact will be the better protection to workers in plants, as this process is not toxic and will not require elaborate waste disposal procedures. This project will also enhance the scientific understanding of the mechanisms by which pretreatments contribute to the protection of metals.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 98.73K | Year: 2009

This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will address the problem of solvent-based primers and coatings on metals that require a conversion coatings on the substrate for adhesion and corrosion performance. Such primers also contain toxic chromate-containing anti-corrosion pigments. The objective of the project will be to formulate anti-corrosion primers and complete coatings ('supercoats' or self-priming coatings) for a wide range of metals, such as aluminum alloys, hot-dip galvanized steel and cold-rolled steel. Instead of using hydrophobic primers we will formulate coatings that are more hydrophilic but possess a highly hydrophobic metal-coating interface. Such coatings will essentially consist of water-dispersed resins, organofunctional silanes and nanoparticles. They will contain very little VOC and non-chromate anti-corrosion pigments. In this Phase I our objectives and technical results will be to, i) better understand the reactions between the components in the systems, such as resins and silanes, and how these interaction determine the properties of the system, and ii) to have at least one formulation that can be sprayed onto a bare metal and then forms a 100-ýým one-step coating that meets certain performance criteria, such as adhesion and corrosion protection. The broader impacts of the project will be that this activity will enhance our scientific understanding of the mechanisms by which coatings protect metals and how anti-corrosion pigments work in such systems. The relationship between the hydrophilicity of the coating vehicle and the water-solubility of the pigment will be addressed in this project. The mechanism by which certain inhibitors protect metals, e.g., phosphates, is another focus of our study. This high-risk project will have considerable cost and environmental advantages. Potential customers for this technology are numerous. Examples are the aerospace industry (coatings for aircraft), automotive industry (car repair finishes and modification of the painting line in automobile manufacturing plants), wash primers for repair and touch-up, shipbuilding industry, the coil coating (steel) industry, and many others, representing a commercial value of at least $100 million. This technology has the potential to revolutionize the paint and coating industry. Its societal impact will be that workers in paint-manufacturing plants will no longer be exposed to vapors of organic solvents or to toxic chromate-containing materials.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2009

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project addresses the important problem of replacing anti-corrosion chromate-based pigments in primers for metals. We will mimic the properties of chromate in two novel, on-demand pigments, both added to a primer. The primer will then provide corrosion resistance to several metals such as steel, galvanized steel and aluminum alloys and also protection of defects in the coating due to its slow-release effect. One pigment will consist of an inorganic particle whose surface is a cation exchanger. We will attach corrosion-inhibiting cations to it. The other pigment is an inorganic particle whose surface is an anion exchanger. We will attach corrosion-inhibiting anions to it. When an electrolyte enters the coating, the pigments will release various ions, which are effective in protecting corrosion of aluminum and galvanized steel. When plain water enters the coating, the pigments will remain dormant, i.e., they provide corrosion protection on-demand only. This project will be executed in collaboration with the University of Cincinnati, where more complex ion exchangers will be synthesized and tested. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is in a new coating technology that is environmentally friendly. The new material will also be flexible, in that we can tailor the four components to a particular metal substrate and primer. As a result, potential customers for this technology will be numerous. Examples are the automotive industry (for car repair finishes, and the painting line in automobile manufacturing plants), wash primers for repair and touch-up, the shipbuilding industry, the aerospace industry (coatings for aircraft), the coil coating (steel) industry, and many others. Combined, these markets represent a commercial opportunity of at least $5 billion. The societal impact will be that workers in paint-manufacturing plants will no longer be exposed to hazardous chromate-containing materials. This project will also enhance our scientific understanding of the mechanisms by which coatings protect metals and how anti-corrosion pigments work in such systems. In particular, the relationship between the hydrophilicity of the coating and the water-solubility of the pigment will be elucidated in this project. The mechanism by which certain inhibitors protect metals is another focus of our study.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.58K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel environmentally-compliant process to produce an advanced alloy coating(s) that imparts excellent corrosion and wear resistance to structural metals on military aircraft and weapon systems. The resulting composite coating and the coating process do not consist of any hazardous materials such as heavy metals chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), beryllium (Be), nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) that are listed on the Office of the Secretary of Defenses (OSD) Emerging Contaminants WATCH List and/or ACTION List; BENEFIT: To eliminate hazardous materials in DOD manufacturing and maintenance locations To prolong the lifetime of metal parts used for military aircraft and weapon systems

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