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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

Africans need to be proud of their brands and local companies and do everything they can to boost the image and reputation of these brands, says Brand Leadership Group founder and chairperson Thebe Ikalafeng. “The top brands that Africans admire are all foreign. How are we going to transform the continent if we continually boost the brands of other countries?” Ikalafeng asked a packed plenary hall, at African Utility Week, in Cape Town. He said Safaricom, from Kenya; Nandos, from South Africa; the Nation Media Group, from Kenya; MTN, from South Africa, and Econet, in Zimbabwe, had been identified by Forbes as among the top ten most innovative companies in Africa. But African companies needed to build further on their successes. He gave an example of Starbucks and coffee. “Branding is everything. An unbranded cup of coffee typically costs $1.25, while an average cup of Starbucks coffee goes for $3.25. Starbucks goes to Ethiopia, buys coffee for $0.20, goes to America, slaps on the logo and brings it back to Africa for $3.25 a cup – and you should see Africans lining up for it.” Ikalafeng said African utilities had a tremendous opportunity to build their brands and communicate more effectively with their customers. “Utilities are the life-blood of the economy. Branding is an important vehicle for us to build our continent.” He also warned against complacency and poor service. “We are unlucky in this continent that most of our utilities are run by government. Citizens have mostly given up their job to hold governments to account [though]. But Africans are no longer going to accept mediocrity.” He called on utilities to up their game. “Africa is the future. Let’s be patriotic. Our job is to love our country and our continent.  Let’s align with our values and deliver on our promises.”


DEVON, 17-May-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — Ethical business practice can flourish even in countries with widespread corporate corruption problems, research shows. Investors and the public are more willing to support and pay for ethical goods and business trading in places where it is scarce, according to a new study of companies in India, Egypt and Zimbabwe. Companies operating in this way can stand out if they reject and make a stand against unethical behaviour, and consumers will support them. The study shows entrepreneurs wanting to operate ethically need to make use of the media, independent judiciary and the public, civic, religious and trade organisations to help fight their cause. The research, by experts at the University of Exeter Business School, China Europe International Business School and Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Virginia, shows operating ethically in a corrupt environment can be an opportunity for businesses to build a unique reputation and encourage people who have not fought against corruption to be supporters of ethical business. The academics carried out almost 120 interviews covering five firms in India, Egypt and Zimbabwe. Their findings based on two of the firms are published in the Harvard Business Review and Journal of Management Studies. Professor William Harvey, from the University of Exeter Business School, said: “It isn’t enough just to behave ethically. Companies also need to get the support of the public and investors for their actions to gain a good reputation. “Understanding how to do this is very important to new firms, especially from emerging economies such as China, India, Brazil, South Africa, and Nigeria, where weak institutional regimes and growing business opportunities combine to create opportunities for corruption. As globalization gathers steam, more and more companies will come across the challenge of how to deal effectively with corruption.” The experts studied the experiences of two firms who had tried to resist corruption in India and Zimbabwe and had been successful – Econet and Alacrity. They carried out interviews, including with the founders of both companies, and with managers, former managers, employees, customers, suppliers, members of the press, and other informed external sources. They also examined company documents such as annual reports, internal circulars, market reports and press coverage of the business.


Ethical business practice can flourish even in countries with widespread corporate corruption problems, research shows. Investors and the public are more willing to support and pay for ethical goods and business trading in places where it is scarce, according to a new study of companies in India, Egypt and Zimbabwe. Companies operating in this way can stand out if they reject and make a stand against unethical behaviour, and consumers will support them. The study shows entrepreneurs wanting to operate ethically need to make use of the media, independent judiciary and the public, civic, religious and trade organisations to help fight their cause. The research, by experts at the University of Exeter Business School, China Europe International Business School and Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Virginia, shows operating ethically in a corrupt environment can be an opportunity for businesses to build a unique reputation and encourage people who have not fought against corruption to be supporters of ethical business. The academics carried out almost 120 interviews covering five firms in India, Egypt and Zimbabwe. Their findings based on two of the firms are published in the Harvard Business Review and Journal of Management Studies. Professor William Harvey, from the University of Exeter Business School, said: "It isn't enough just to behave ethically. Companies also need to get the support of the public and investors for their actions to gain a good reputation. "Understanding how to do this is very important to new firms, especially from emerging economies such as China, India, Brazil, South Africa, and Nigeria, where weak institutional regimes and growing business opportunities combine to create opportunities for corruption. As globalization gathers steam, more and more companies will come across the challenge of how to deal effectively with corruption." The experts studied the experiences of two firms who had tried to resist corruption in India and Zimbabwe and had been successful - Econet and Alacrity. They carried out interviews, including with the founders of both companies, and with managers, former managers, employees, customers, suppliers, members of the press, and other informed external sources. They also examined company documents such as annual reports, internal circulars, market reports and press coverage of the business.


Bigum M.,Technical University of Denmark | Petersen C.,Econet Inc. | Christensen T.H.,Technical University of Denmark | Scheutz C.,Technical University of Denmark
Waste Management | Year: 2013

A total of 26.1. Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6. kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11. kg of batteries, 2.2. kg of toners and 16. kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29. g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4. g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1. g of toners and 7. g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Trademark
Econet Inc. | Date: 2013-01-10

Hair conditioner, massage oil, facial scrubs, skin cleansing lotion, skin moisturizer, bath gel, shower gel, skin toners, hair gel, hair spray, eye cream, skin soap, bath powder, skin cream, body lift powder, body lift activator, esthetic essence in the nature of essential oils for personal use and esthetic massage cream.


Trademark
Econet Inc. | Date: 2013-01-10

Dietary supplements.


News Article | June 15, 2015
Site: techmoran.com

Zimbabwe’s mobile payment solution that enables Econet customers to send or recieve money to loved ones, buy prepaid airtime and pay for goods and services EcoCash has recieved approval to operate cross border remittance service from South Africa. The firm and its South African partners have  been approved by the South Africa Reserve Bank, the he central bank of South Africa and the country’s financial services regulator. The service which took over 18 months to be secured is expected to go live in a few weeks will see Zimbabweans living in South Africa to send money directly to any Econet Wireless number anywhere in Zimbabwe via EcoCash. This will be a major relief for Zimbabweans working in South Africa who reportedly find it hard to send money back home to their friends and relatives. “By making the process of sending money from South Africa highly accessible, quicker and more convenient, Zimbabweans living in South Africa will be able to send remittances of even less than R50 at affordable rates,” announced the firm. In a statement on its site, Econet says it predicts the new service to fundamentally change the remittance patterns characterized by large, lump sum transfers of around R1 000 being sent monthly or every several months. The firm is also hoping the “micro-remittance” solution will stimulate increased remittances into Zimbabwe which will help ease liquidity challenges in the economy.


Bargain hunters rejoice. Econet Zimbabwe is now selling 1GB of data for $1 and 3GB for $2. Those are the new prices of the Econet Dream Data Bundles that were introduced last month in the Zimbabwe. Econet is determined not to lose its stranglehold on the Zimbabwean broadband market with this latest offer, which makes it the cheapest mobile broadband package on the market. The Dream Bundles also had their access window extended from a previous midnight to 5am window, to a new 10 pm to 8 am window. That’s a 1-2 punch by the telco giant. And the winner is… the customers.


News Article | February 1, 2012
Site: www.vanguardngr.com

…As court judgment reinstates Econet’s equity. A FRESH tussle over equity at Airtel Networks, before the courts since 2003 may now shift to the boardroom as  a result of a judgment by the Federal High Court sitting in Kaduna, presided over by Justice Shuaib in the matter of equity claim of five per cent by Econet Wireless Ltd in Airtel Networks Ltd. But the telecoms operator has said that it has filed an appeal against the judgment, while reiterating that said judgment will have no impact on the holdings of other shareholders in Airtel Nigeria. Six days ago on January 24, Justice Shuaib delivered his judgement on a matter which has been before the courts since 2003, and ordered that: Airtel should reinstate the five per cent (5%) shareholding of Econet Wireless Ltd (EWL);lAll actions, and resolutions taken by the company since October 2003, at which EWL was entitled to be notified, and to participate in, as a shareholder, but was prohibited, are null and void. This includes decisions to sell shares, issue shares, and also transfer shares to third parties. The name change from Econet Wireless Nigeria Limited, effected in 2003, was irregular, and must be reversed forthwith. Justice Shuaib further ordered the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC), to cancel any certificate previously issued for the change of the name of the company and restore the name of the company to Econet Wireless Nigeria Limited. But in a statement posted on Econet Wireless International’s portal, dated January 30, Strive Masiyiwa, Econet’s supremo said: “It is universally accepted throughout the world, that when shares in a company are allotted and share certificates issued, as confirmation of ownership, this is sacrosanct. “In October 2003, Econet Wireless Ltd received a letter from the chairman of the company — Mr Oba Otudeko, in which he advised that at a board meeting directors had decided that Econet Wireless was no longer a shareholder, Econet’s share certificate had been cancelled, and Econet’s name removed from the shareholder register. The motive for this unprecedented action was the circumvention of Econet Wireless’ rights as a shareholder in order to facilitate the sale of shares, first to Celtel International, and later to Bharti Airtel. “As a result of these actions, Econet Wireless was left with no option but to seek redress through the courts. An application was filed in the Nigerian Federal High Court in October 2003, more than eight years ago. Since then, every legal avenue to delay the process was pursued by the defendants  through their lawyers, in order to  frustrate Econet Wireless. “I am very disappointed that whilst it was clear to Celtel, Zain and Bharti Airtel that Econet Wireless was a shareholder, they still chose to pursue a path, in which the end justified the means. It is clear even to those with the most basic understanding of company law that the board of a company has no power in any jurisdiction to simply cancel the shares of a shareholder but their desire to own the company was so great that they were prepared to overlook the facts and ignore our rights. “The substance of this ruling, which was known by Celtel and then Bharti, was a matter of record in the legal documents of the company. It is also common cause to even the casual reader that the order given has far-reaching consequences on the current ownership status of the company. We have made it clear to the company, that as a shareholder, we would like to ensure that all actions that must be taken to comply with the court order are undertaken in such a way that there is minimal disruption to the ongoing operations of the company.” While opting to appeal the judgment, in a statement issued by Emmanuel Otokhine, the telco’s Head of Public Relations, the management of Airtel Nigeria said. “In the light of the judgment by the Federal High Court of Nigeria regarding Econet Wireless Limited’s (EWL) claim to the ownership of 5% equity in Airtel Networks Limited (Airtel Nigeria), an appeal against the said judgment has been filed by Airtel Nigeria. The company abides by and has full confidence in the law of the land, and believes the Appeal Court will determine the appeal on its merits. “In addition, the judgment will have no impact on the equity holding of other shareholders in Airtel Nigeria. “We wish to assure our customers, employees and business partners that the ruling will in no way affect operations or the company’s ability to fulfill obligations to its stakeholders.” But it would seem that both parties will have to come to the negotiating table at the end of the day to marshall options for the future. This much is evident in the position taken by Masiyiwa in the statement posted on Econet’s website. “The board of Econet Wireless and I remain willing to sit down with Bharti Airtel, to review the best way forward for all parties. In the meantime, we have a fiduciary responsibility to take all of the necessary steps to vigorously protect the interests of our shareholders.”

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