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Rockaway, NJ, United States

Moskowitz D.,EcolSciences Inc. | Moskowitz D.,Rutgers University | Golden D.,Endangered and Nongame Species Program
Entomological News

This report documents the first records of the green lacewing Leucochrysa pavida (Hagen) in New Jersey. The collected specimens were a second instar larva from East Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey, two second instar larvae from Tuckahoe, Cape May County, New Jersey, and five second instar larvae from Villas, Cape May County, New Jersey. It is unknown whether these specimens represent a recent range expansion of a more southerly species or a species that was overlooked previously because of extreme crypsis and relatively small size. Source

McDonnell S.E.,EcolSciences Inc. | Moskowitz D.P.,EcolSciences Inc. | Moskowitz D.P.,Rutgers University
Northeastern Naturalist

The range of Okanagana rimosa (Say's Cicada) in eastern North America appears to be widespread but patchy. We report the first known occurrence of mating by the species in New Jersey. We also report the first known record of the species from the state from a previously unpublished specimen collected in 1942 and deposited in the American Museum of Natural History collection. These two reports spanning 68 years are the only known specimens from New Jersey. Source

Wikelski M.,Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Radolfzell) | Wikelski M.,Princeton University | Wikelski M.,Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute | Moxley J.,Princeton University | And 6 more authors.

Neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) are often cited as classic examples of trapline-foragers with potentially extensive foraging ranges. If long-distance movements are habitual, rare plants in widely scattered locations may benefit from euglossine pollination services. Here we report the first successful use of micro radio telemetry to track the movement of an insect pollinator in a complex and forested environment. Our results indicate that individual male orchid bees (Exaerete frontalis) habitually use large rainforest areas (at least 42-115 ha) on a daily basis. Aerial telemetry located individuals up to 5 km away from their core areas, and bees were often stationary, for variable periods, between flights to successive localities. These data suggest a higher degree of site fidelity than what may be expected in a free living male bee, and has implications for our understanding of biological activity patterns and the evolution of forest pollinators. © 2010 Wikelski et al. Source

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