Ecology Research Laboratory

Dehradun, India

Ecology Research Laboratory

Dehradun, India
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Mandal G.,Ecology Research Laboratory | Joshi S.P.,Ecology Research Laboratory
Forest Science and Technology | Year: 2015

Mountains are remarkably diverse and globally important as cores of biological diversity. Mountains’ greatest values may be as sources of all the world's major rivers, and those of the Himalayas are no less important in terms of provisioning the ecosystem services that have thus far sustained huge populations of people and high levels of biodiversity. The survival of these ecosystems and wildlife are now threatened by human activities such as timber harvesting, intensive grazing by livestock, tourism, industrialization, and agricultural expansion into forestlands, and, above all, climate change which has led to the invasion of many noxious weeds. The present study aimed to analyze the invasion status of one such noxious weed, lantana (Lantana camara), from the western Himalayan foothills. A total of 122 plant species were recorded as associates from all lantana infested sites comprising 73 shrubs, 39 herbs, five sedges, and three grasses belonging to 47 families. Fabaceae and Asteraceae were found to be the most dominant families growing generously with lantana. Significant site effect was frequently observed than effect due to invasion status. Soil samples were collected and analyzed from highly invaded and moderately invaded areas to see the relationship between soil physicochemical properties and lantana growth. Results of the present study show that factors such as pH, total nitrogen, soil organic carbon, phosphorus, and potassium contents are positively impelling lantana invasion in all the sites. In some places soil nutrients were found improved effectively due to lantana invasion when compared from the soil of non-invaded areas thereby, increasing the likelihood of further invasion. © 2015 Korean Forest Society.


Mandal G.,Ecology Research Laboratory | Joshi S.P.,Ecology Research Laboratory
International Journal of Conservation Science | Year: 2014

Structure, composition and function are the three important attributes of forest ecosystems. These attributes change in response to climate, topography, soil and disturbances. The above mentioned factors along with forest succession are also responsible for both local and landscape level variations in forest ecosystems. The present study aimed to analyse the quantitative vegetation dynamics and diversity of plants from the dry deciduous forests and fallow lands of Doon Valley. Forest sites were chosen from three extreme end of the valley and other sites were selected according to the level of variations to study species richness, regeneration and change in community composition in the context of overstorey structure and invasion success of a non native invasive species Lantana camara employing nested quadrat method. Change in community composition has taken place with Shorea robusta as the main dominant and Mallotus philippensis, Syzygium cumini and Ehretia laevis becoming co - dominant tree species in all community; this association is new for these forests. Effect of overstorey structure was noticeable, highest species richness and diversity was increasing with a decrease in tree density and basal area. Lantana camara over past few years has become a threat to the western Himalayan forests. On the basis of IVI (Importance Value Index) assessment it is clear that Lantana is profusely growing in all types of habitats, on the other hand the invasion of other plant species is restricted to their suitable habitats. The invasion success of Lantana was found depending on forest gap size as gap size was significantly correlated to the inflorescence, infructescence and pollinator visitors.


Mandal G.,Ecology Research Laboratory | Joshi S.P.,Ecology Research Laboratory
Journal of Forestry Research | Year: 2015

This study describes the different parameters used to derive the allometric equation for calculating the biomass of an invasive woody shrub Lantana camara L. from the subtropical conditions of western Himalaya. It identifies the most accurate and convenient method for biomass calculation by comparing destructive with non-destructive methodology. Different parameters were measured on a wide range of Lantana from different community levels for the non-destructive calculation of total above-ground biomass. Different explanatory variables were identified and measured such as basal diameter either as a single independent variable or in combination with plant height. The other suitable combinations of available independent variables include crown length, crown width, crown area, crown volume and coverage of the plant. Amongst the wide range of allometric equations used with different variables, the equation with D2H as a variable was found to be the most suitable estimator of biomass calculation for Lantana. Sahastradhara, being the most disturbed area due to its high tourist activity round the year, showed maximum coverage (58.57 % ha−1), highest biomass (13,559.60 kg ha−1) and carbon density (6,373.01 kg ha−1) of Lantana. The degree of Lantana’s invasiveness in subtropical conditions was also calculated on the basis of importance value index (IVI). The maximum IVI (22.77) and mean coverage (26.8 % ha−1) was obtained from the areas near Jolly Grant airport, indicating that physically disturbed areas are more suitable for the growth of Lantana, which may significantly increase shrub biomass. The importance of incorporating allometric equations in calculation of shrub biomass, and its role in atmospheric carbon assimilation has thus been highlighted through the findings of this study. © 2015, Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Mandal G.,Ecology Research Laboratory | Joshi S.P.,Ecology Research Laboratory
Annali di Botanica | Year: 2015

Understanding the factors that intensify the invasion patterns across the geographic ranges is an important challenge in the effort to conserve biodiversity. In the present study we tried to establish a correlation between the exotic invasive richness with different habitat types. To achieve the goal we used Importance value Index for biodiversity assessment and established linear regression alongwith spearman's rank correlation to testify the significant relationship between chosen habitat types and dependent variables, including exotic species richness and cover. Invasive cover from all three habitats was positively correlated with the invasive species number but negatively correlated with the total species richness and the native richness. Invasive species richness, however, was neither correlated with native richness nor the total species richness. In riparian areas a significant positive correlation was observed between invasive species richness and areas away from direct water sources than areas near water sources. Our results highlight that riparian areas despite having high native richness are more prone to plant invasion than forest periphery and highway roadsides. However, areas with increased feral cattle activity alongwith scattered cattle dung from all three habitats were also found promoting plant invasions. Our result from riparian areas thus rebuff the widespread hypothesis (rich biodiversity less invasion) proposing that migration and establishment of invasive species are likely to be based primarily on changes in propagule pressure, availability of nutrients and light and not exclusively on habitat richness.


Mandal G.,Ecology Research Laboratory | Joshi S.P.,Ecology Research Laboratory
International Journal of Ecology and Development | Year: 2015

The present study aimed to calculate the biomass and carbon density from different forest types including sal (Shorea robusta) dominated dry deciduous forest of Doon valley (a part of western Himalaya). Volume equations with variables like DBH and tree height were found to be the best for biomass calculation and are hence used in the present study. The maximum total sal biomass was recorded from Lachhiwala forest (346.46 Mg ha-1) but the total tree biomass was recorded from the forests of Rajpur (426.75 Mg ha-1) with carbon density of 213.37 MgC ha-1. The maximum contribution in forest biomass and carbon accumulation was from the sal tree however the co dominant species like Miliusa velutina (Dunal) Hook. f. & Thomson, Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels, Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Muell.-Arg, Anogeissus latifolia Wall., Ehretia laevis Roxb., also contributed a substantial amount to determine the forest carbon inventory. The SOC was within the range of 39.34 MgC ha-1–65.98 MgC ha-1 and was recorded maximum from dry deciduous forests of Lachhiwala. The highest Nitrogen was calculated from the soil of degraded forests of Golatappar and moist deciduous forests of Thano. The present study therefore concluded that dry, moist and degraded deciduous forests of Doon valley have enormous carbon sequestration potential and can help the policy makers and researcher understanding the regional and global CO2 cycle. © 2015 IJED.


Mandal G.,Ecology Research Laboratory | Joshi S.P.,Ecology Research Laboratory
Journal of Asia-Pacific Biodiversity | Year: 2014

Habitat suitability assessment of the invasive species Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson from Himalayan forests reveals some interesting findings and conclusions. At different study sites, 29 of 72 species were exotic and invasive and comprised 21 genera and eight families. Indigenous species accounted for 59% of the total species and comprised 26 genera and 11 families. Perennials outnumbered the annuals in all study sites. Chromolaena odorata and Lantana camara L. were the only invasive species that were common to all sites with high importance value index values. The present work reveals that sites with high biotic pressure, maximum temperature variation, open forest canopy, and free from herbivory are the most suitable habitat for the growth of C. odorata. An elevated level of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, soil organic matter, and nitrogen and acidic soil in all invaded sites are possible reasons for further invasion of C. odorata. Copyright © 2014 National Science Museum of Korea (NSMK) and Korea National Arboretum (KNA).


PubMed | Ecology Research Laboratory
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of environmental biology | Year: 2010

To see the relative tolerance of the plant species, ten different plant species i.e. Ficus rumphii, Pongamia pinnata, Alstonia scholaris, Holoptelea integrifolia, Saraca indica, Pithecolobium dulcis, Cassia simea, Bauhinia variegata, Azadirachta indica and Grewelia robusta was taken from residential (SI), industrial (SII) and commercial (SIII) area of the city as this florais very much common to the Brass city and is planted on the roadside. The quality of air with respect to SPM, SO2 and NO2 has been also assessed on respective sites to see its effect on biochemical parameters of the leaves i.e. pH, total water content, chlorophyll and ascorbic acid and evaluate the (air pollution tolerance index (APTI) of various plants. It was concluded that Pongamia pinnata 15.8, Pithecolobium dulcis 34.8, Holoptelea integrifolia 55.8 and Saraca indica 52.0 have very high APTI value over control so these are considered as high tolerant tree species, Ficus rumphii 35.7, Azadirachta indica 30.5 and Grewelia robusta 34.3 have slightlymoreAPTI value over control so these are considered as moderately tolerant tree species and Alstonia scholaris 21.5, Cassia simea 6.09 and Bauhinia variegata 18.22 have lessAPTI value than control, so these are sensitive species respectively. One way ANOVA finds the obtained values to be highly significant (p < 0.001) at the industrial site. Thus present findings show that Brass and allied industries are the prominent sources responsible for the elevated level of air pollutants at the industrial site.

Loading Ecology Research Laboratory collaborators
Loading Ecology Research Laboratory collaborators