Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Ojiya, Japan

Ishimori T.,Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences | Takahashi K.,Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences | Goto M.,Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences | Nakagawa S.,Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences | And 5 more authors.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2012

The synergistic effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), mild heating, and amino acids on the germination of Clostridium sporogenes spores were examined by determining the number of surviving spores that returned to vegetative growth after pasteurization following these treatments. Pressurization at 200 MPa at a temperature higher than 40°C and treatment with some of the 19 L-amino acids at 10mMor higher synergistically facilitated germination. When one of these factors was omitted, the level of germination was insignificant. Pressures of 100 and 400 MPa were less effective than 200 MPa. The spores were effectively inactivated by between 1.8 and 4.8 logs by pasteurization at 80°C after pressurization at 200 MPa at 45°C for 120 min with one of the amino acids with moderate hydrophobicity, such as Leu, Phe, Cys Met, Ala, Gly, or Ser. However, other amino acids showed poor inactivation effects of less than 0.9 logs. Spores in solutions containing 80mMof either Leu, Phe, Cys, Met, Ala, Gly, or Ser were successfully inactivated by pasteurization by more than 5.4 logs after pressurization at 200 MPa at 70°C for 15 to 120 min. Ala and Met reduced the spore viability by 2.8 and 1.8 logs, respectively, by pasteurization at a concentration of 1mMunder 200 MPa at 70°C. These results indicate that germination of the spores is facilitated by a combination of high hydrostatic pressure, mild heating, and amino acids. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. Source


Kobayashi A.,Echigo Seika Co. | Nishiumi T.,Niigata University
Review of High Pressure Science and Technology/Koatsuryoku No Kagaku To Gijutsu | Year: 2015

This paper describes the application of high-pressure treatment from a viewpoint of industrial utilization. Highpressure treatment induces the transformation of agricultural and livestock products, and this ``pressure history'' (the in‰uence of high-pressure treatment) has an eŠect on later processes. A later enzymatic reaction is promoted by the destruction of the cell walls, even in post-harvest farm products. In addition, the heat-resistant spores decreased after receiving a high-pressure treatment of 200 MPa before heating sterilization, and even heating at 100°C to 105°C showed that food could still be sterilized. © 2015 Japan Society of High Pressure Science and Technology. All rights reserved. Source


Trademark
Echigoseika Co. | Date: 2013-12-09

binding agents for ice cream (edible ices); meat tenderizers for household purpose; preparations for stiffening whipped cream; aromatic preparations for food (not from essential oils); tea; coffee; cocoa; ice; confectionery; bread; soya bean paste (condiment); worcestershire sauce; meat gravies; ketchup sauce; soy sauce; vinegar; vinegar mixes; seasoning soy sauce (soba-tsuyu); salad dressings; white sauce; mayonnaise; sauces for barbecued meat; cube sugar; fructose (for culinary purposes); crystal sugar; sugar; maltose; honey; glucose for culinary purposes; powdered starch syrup for culinary purposes; glutinous starch syrup (mizu-ame); table salt mixed with sesame seeds; cooking salt; roasted and ground sesame seeds; celery salt; chemical seasonings; spices; ice cream mixes; sherbet mixes; unroasted coffee beans; cereal preparations; almond past; Chinese stuffed dumplings (gyoza); sandwiches; Chinese steamed dumplings (shumai); sushi; octopus dumplings (takoyaki); steamed buns with meat filling (niku-manjuh); hamburgers; pizzas; lunch boxes; hot dogs; meat pies; ravioli; yeast powder; koji (fermented malted rice); yeast; baking powder; instant confectionery mixes; by-product of rice for food (sake lees); rice; husked oats; husked barley; flour for food; gluten for food.


Trademark
Echigoseika Co. | Date: 2005-09-02

binding agents for ice cream (edible ices); meat tenderizers for household purpose; preparations for stiffening whipped cream; aromatic preparations for food (not from essential oils); tea; coffee; cocoa; ice; confectionery; bread; soya bean paste (condiment); worcestershire sauce; meat gravies; ketchup sauce; soy sauce; vinegar; vinegar mixes; seasoning soy sauce (soba-tsuyu); salad dressings; white sauce; mayonnaise; sauces for barbecued meat; cube sugar; fructose (for culinary purposes); crystal sugar; sugar; maltose; honey; glucose for culinary purposes; powdered starch syrup for culinary purposes; glutinous starch syrup (mizu-ame); table salt mixed with sesame seeds; cooking salt; roasted and ground sesame seeds; celery salt; chemical seasonings; spices; ice cream mixes; sherbet mixes; unroasted coffee beans; cereal preparations; almond past; Chinese stuffed dumplings (gyoza); sandwiches; Chinese steamed dumplings (shumai); sushi; octopus dumplings (takoyaki); steamed buns with meat filling (niku-manjuh); hamburgers; pizzas; lunch boxes; hot dogs; meat pies; ravioli; yeast powder; koji (fermented malted rice); yeast; baking powder; instant confectionery mixes; by-product of rice for food (sake lees); rice; husked oats; husked barley; flour for food; gluten for food.


[Object] An object of the present invention is to provide an extremely practical and innovative food product heat treatment method capable of performing the same heat cooking and heat sterilization as that of the conventional technique while enhancing economy and productivity in comparison with the conventional technique. [Means of Achievement] The food product heat treatment method is characterized in comprising placing a food product (

Discover hidden collaborations