European Business School EBS

United Kingdom

European Business School EBS

United Kingdom
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Knabke T.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Olbrich S.,European Business School EBS
Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, PACIS 2016 - Proceedings | Year: 2016

The class of business intelligence (BI) systems is used as a basis for decision making in most big organizations. Extensive initiatives have been launched to accomplish adequate and timely decision support as an important factor to achieve and sustain competitive advantage. Within turbulent market environments it is challenging to keep up a distinguishable long-term strategy while quickly reacting to changing circumstances. This area of conflicts holds particularly true for BI as it is originally used to retrospectively reflect an organization's performance and built upon stability and efficiency. Therefore, we investigate how dynamic BI capabilities, i.e. adoption of assets, market understanding and intimacy as well as business operations, impact the agility of BI. We approach our goal from a dynamic capability perspective. Starting from a literature review of dynamic capabilities of information systems (IS) and BI, we propose hypotheses to connect dynamic BI capabilities and BI agility. Derived hypotheses based on existing literature will be tested in our prospective research agenda. A small pre-study showed promising results. In-memory (IM) technology seems to be a technology enabler for agile BI. However, adoption of BI assets and the focus on market orientation and business operations may even intensify the positive effect.


Tiefenbacher K.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Olbrich S.,European Business School EBS
Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, PACIS 2016 - Proceedings | Year: 2016

Improvements in digital technologies have enabled changes in customer behavior which present companies with the challenge to offer enriched customer experiences. These changes come along with an increased availability of customer-produced content, e.g. via social media, mobile devices etc. Leadership in this digital ecosystem is determined by a company's capabilities to understand its customers' behavior which manifests in high volumes of continuously generated, heterogeneous data; to actually apply the derived insights in business operations; and finally to create value for both the customers and itself. This paper focuses on the first step, i.e. the understanding of customers by means of big data, and builds on our previous research that derived a conceptual framework for big data in the domain of CRM from scholarly literature. To validate and refine this framework we coded multiple success stories from vendors of big data solutions, guided by Grounded Theory. The results suggest a transformation of a company's internal CRM capabilities to gain a deeper understanding of their customers derived from big data. By pinpointing the development of relevant capabilities for leveraging big data in the domain of CRM and providing guidelines for deriving customer information, the results contribute equally to theory and practice.


Raeth P.,European Business School EBS | Urbach N.,European Business School EBS | Smolnik S.,European Business School EBS | Butler B.S.,University of Pittsburgh | Konigs P.,Cedros
16th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2010, AMCIS 2010 | Year: 2010

Widely discussed in the media, Web 2.0 systems have drawn the attention of corporations, many of which now seek to adopt Web 2.0 technologies and transfer its benefits to their organizations. Organizations often struggle with the adoption of information systems, and Web 2.0 systems are certainly no exception. As an empirical foundation, we studied three organizations that successfully adopted Web 2.0 systems. We conducted a narrative analysis of the case study material to produce a process theory for Web 2.0 system adoption. Finally, we compare it to the enterprise system experience cycle of Markus and Tanis (2000). Our results indicate that the adoption of Web 2.0 systems differs from larger enterprise system adoption projects. This is rooted in the lower implementation and maintenance costs as well as lower technical complexity of Web 2.0 systems. Furthermore, its voluntary characteristics lead to an adoption process that focuses mainly on convincing users of its benefits.


Blome C.,European Business School EBS | Schoenherr T.,Michigan State University
International Journal of Production Economics | Year: 2011

Supply Chain Risk Management has become a key concern for organizations, which is even further emphasized by the current economic and financial crisis. Against this background, this paper investigates successful approaches and experiences by companies in dealing with this new reality, especially as it concerns the supply side. Using in-depth case studies conducted among eight European enterprises, we develop a set of propositions about how companies manage supply risks in financial crises, highlight how their risk management approaches have shifted, and illustrate how they are related to Enterprise Risk Management. Our framework is further differentiated based on whether firms are predominantly engaged in manufacturing or services - a factor influencing how supply chain risk is managed. Transaction cost economics serves as our main theoretical anchor. By rigorously grounding our research in both theory and empirical evidence, we provide valuable insight for both academia and practice. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Mohan K.,European Business School EBS | Ahlemann F.,European Business School EBS
16th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2010, AMCIS 2010 | Year: 2010

Organizations invest considerable resources in the development and implementation of IT project management (IT PM) methodologies to increase productivity and quality as well as to save time, effort, and resources. However, such methodologies are often rejected outright by users. Our research analyzes the determinants of individual usage behavior in order to enable organizations to engineer IT PM methodologies that not only provide strategic benefits but also meet the needs of actual users. The existing literature, especially Triandis' Theory of Interpersonal Behavior as well as initial case study results from a number of organizations are used to construct a conceptual model. This research model includes four dimensions: a) Value, b) workgroup influence, c) self-beliefs, and d) organizational characteristics, which are all considered to positively influence the development of the intention to use a methodology. Additionally, we find that the effect of intentions on actual usage can be weakened by an individual's automatic behavior such as habits.


Urbach N.,European Business School EBS | Smolnik S.,European Business School EBS | Riempp G.,European Business School EBS
16th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2010, AMCIS 2010 | Year: 2010

The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of employee portal success and to investigate the industry differences with regard to the success factors. We introduce a theoretical model for this that is based on the DeLone and McLean IS Success Model, which considers the specific requirements of employee portals. We tested the associations between our model's different success dimensions by using more than 6,000 employees' responses that were collected in a survey of 22 companies across different industries participating in an international benchmarking study. Furthermore, we analyzed potential industry differences by means of a multi-group comparison. We applied structural equation modeling to carry out the data analysis. The study's results indicate that, besides the factors contributing to the success of IS in general, other success dimensions - like the quality of the collaboration and process support - have to be considered when aiming for a successful employee portal. The results of the multi-group comparison further indicate that the impacts of the success factors differ in intensity and significance between the industries in our sample. The study's findings make it possible for practitioners to understand the industry-specific levers with which to improve their employee portals and to prioritize their investments accordingly. By empirically validating a comprehensive success model for employee portals, the study's results advance the theoretical development in this area and present a basis for further research in this field.


Radeke F.,European Business School EBS
16th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2010, AMCIS 2010 | Year: 2010

Over the past few years, enterprise architecture management (EAM) has become increasingly popular in academia and in practice. One reason for this is that organizations seek to make use of various benefits that have been associated with EAM. However, researchers have stressed that EAM research has mainly focused on prescriptive frameworks and methodologies, whereas these concepts and associated impacts and outcomes have seen little generalization and verification to date. In this paper we explore this claim. Based on a comprehensive literature analysis, we found that prescriptive research does indeed dominate the field. However, we also found that few researchers have analyzed and generalized EAM phenomena, whereas the share of contributions to explanation and prediction is negligibly small. We summarize common EAM processes as well as impact and outcome factors that have emerged from this research and show to what extent the relationship between these components has thus far been explained.


Hertlein M.,European Business School EBS | Smolnik S.,European Business School EBS | Riempp G.,European Business School EBS
Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences | Year: 2010

Globally dispersed teams engaged in development cooperation are often of the same nationality and operate within the same cultural background. The challenge for such teams is to align their process knowledge with specific less developed countries' cultural and political contexts. By means of a single case study, we were able to ascertain a strong demand for knowledge delivery and the possible benefits of synergetic opportunities. However, the knowledge processes, instruments, and tools at the disposal of globally dispersed teams are insufficient to meet their demands and promote optimal knowledge sharing. Consequently, we propose the implementation of a knowledge center (KC). As a service unit for knowledge management initiatives, such a center could support knowledge-sharing processes by considering a specific team's situational conditions. We present a blueprint for designing such a KC in an international development context. © 2010 IEEE.


Raeth P.,European Business School EBS | Smolnik S.,European Business School EBS
Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences | Year: 2010

Widely discussed in the mass media, Web 2.0, or social software, has also drawn the attention of researchers, developing into a whole new research area. With Web 2.0's further development, corporations aim to adopt its technologies and transfer its benefits, such as enhanced collaboration and knowledge sharing, to their organizations. Whether any of these benefits also apply in an organizational context and whether there are further, still uncovered, benefits remains unclear. Furthermore, research in this area is still in its early stages, thus hampering progress towards qualitative and quantitative models that could provide answers. In order to encourage further progress in this area, we reviewed the existing research on corporate blogging and identified 24 articles that investigate the topic. Using the framework by Ives et al. [18], we categorized the articles for further analysis. By means of process theory, we build a conceptual model and identify the antecedents and consequences of internal corporate weblog usage. Our findings suggest that usage is driven by organizational culture, as well as by attitudes towards blogging. In addition, the benefits of weblog usage are centered on community benefits. © 2010 IEEE.


Hertlein M.,European Business School EBS | Smolnik S.,European Business School EBS | Riempp G.,European Business School EBS
16th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2010, AMCIS 2010 | Year: 2010

Complementing knowledge management (KM) initiatives, specialized service units can support intra-organizational knowledge transfer by conducting research, offering edited contents, or participating in internal networks. This research concentrates specifically on the knowledge center (KC) model, thus following Hertlein et al., whose blueprint is evaluated and further developed by building on a multiple case study. In this design science research process, five KCs from the branch of professional services firms are studied, with particular emphasis on the process dimension. This allows new insights to be gained into the characteristics of KCs. Not only is the KC model largely confirmed, but new details are also added. Furthermore, directions for further research - specifically on the KC's integration into KM initiatives- are provided.

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