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Brooks W.S.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Vaughn M.E.,Eastern Virginia Agriculture Res. and Ext. Ctr | Berger G.L.,University of Arkansas | Griffey C.A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | And 21 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2014

'Atlantic' (Reg. No. CV-354, PI 665041), a six-row, hulled winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) tested as VA06B-19 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, was released in March 2011. Atlantic was derived from the cross VA97B-176/VA92-44-279 using a modified bulk-breeding method. It was evaluated in the Virginia Official Variety Trials from 2008 to 2013 in replicated tests at five to six locations. Atlantic's average grain yield (5349 kg ha-1) was higher than the check cultivars Wysor, Callao, and Price and similar to Thoroughbred. Average grain volume weight of Atlantic (60.8 kg hL-1) was similar to the check cultivar Price and higher than Thoroughbred, Callao, and Wysor. Head emergence of Atlantic is 7 d earlier than Thoroughbred (the predominant barley cultivar grown in Virginia and the eastern United States) and similar to that of Callao. Earlier maturity is a primary factor determining whether barley or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is used in double-cropping systems with soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Grain of Atlantic had an average starch concentration (56.5%) that was higher than Callao, similar to Price, but lower than Thoroughbred. Atlantic provides barley producers and end users in the eastern United States with a widely adapted, early-maturing winter barley cultivar that has good grain quality and is highly resistant to powdery mildew [caused by Blumeria graminis (DC.) E.O. Speer f. sp. hordei Em. Marchal] based on its performance in state and uniform winter barley yield trials. © Crop Science Society of America. All rights reserved.


Griffey C.A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Thomason W.E.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Pitman R.M.,Eastern Virginia Agriculture Res. and Ext. Ctr | Paling J.J.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | And 27 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

'Merl' (Reg. No. CV-1052, PI 658598) soft red winter (SRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), developed and tested as VA03W-412 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, was released in March 2009. Merl was derived from the three-way cross 'Roane'/Pioneer variety 2643//'38158' (PI 619052). Merl is a broadly adapted, high-yielding, mid-season, moderately short, semidwarf (Rht2) cultivar having above-average straw strength and milling and pastry-baking qualities. Merl is resistant to powdery mildew [caused by Blumeria graminis (DC.) E.O. Speer] and moderately resistant to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend.). In Virginia, Merl ranked among the top five cultivars for grain yield with a 3-yr (2007-2009) average of 5725 kg ha-1. Merl had a mean grain volume weight of 76.4 kg hL-1 across 22 environments, which was significantly (P < 0.05) higher (1.9-3.0 kg hL-1) than that of the other top-yielding cultivars. In USDA-ARS Uniform Eastern SRW Wheat Nursery trials conducted at 29 locations, Merl ranked sixth among 46 entries for grain yield (5917 kg ha-1) and seventh for grain volume weight (76.0 kg hL-1) in 2006 and ranked second among 45 entries for grain yield (5529 kg ha-1) and sixth for grain volume weight (75.7 kg hL-1) in 2008. Merl has a soft grain texture, flour softness equivalent values from 57.5 to 60.8 g 100 g-1, and straight-grade flour yields from 70.5 to 71.5 g kg-1. The flour protein concentration (7.5-8.7 g 100 g-1) and gluten strength, assessed via lactic acid solvent retention capacity (101-104 g 100 g-1), of Merl are lower than average. These quality attributes contribute to Merl's above-average pastry-baking quality (cookie-spread diameters of 17.93-18.93 cm). © Crop Science Society of America.


Griffey C.A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Thomason W.E.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Pitman R.M.,Eastern Virginia Agriculture Res. and Ext. Ctr | Gundrum P.G.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | And 28 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

'SW049029104' (Reg. No. CV-1053, PI 658599) soft red winter (SRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in March 2009. SW049029104 was derived from the cross '38158' (PI 619052)/Pioneer variety 2552//'Roane' and was tested under the experimental number VA04W-90. SW049029104 is a broadly adapted, high-yielding, moderately short, semidwarf (Rht2) cultivar that is resistant to powdery mildew [caused by Blumeria graminis (DC.) E.O. Speer] and Fusarium head blight (caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe). In the 2009 USDA-ARS Uniform Southern SRW Wheat Nursery conducted at 25 locations, SW049029104 ranked first among 40 entries for grain yield (4889 kg ha-1) and fourth for grain volume weight (73.2 kg hL-1). The milling and baking qualities of SW049029104 exceeded those of 'USG 3555' and Pioneer brand 26R61. Flour softness and cookie-spread diameter of SW049029104 (61.5-64.8 g 100 g-1 and 18.39-18.48 cm) exceeded those of USG 3555 (57.9-61.1 g 100 g-1 and 18.09- 18.21 cm) and Pioneer brand 26R61 (54.5-61.1 g 100 g-1 and 18.12-18.13 cm). While flour protein concentration of SW049029104 (8.55-8.66 g 100 g-1) was lower than that of USG 3555 (8.88-9.10 g 100 g-1) and Pioneer brand 26R61 (9.65- 9.66 g 100 g-1), its gluten strength, assessed via lactic acid solvent retention capacity (124.7-129.7 g 100 g-1), exceeded that of USG 3555 (118.9-124.0 g 100 g-1) and Pioneer brand 26R61 (113.5-126.0 g 100 g-1). © Crop Science Society of America.


Brooks W.S.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Vaughn M.E.,Eastern Virginia Agriculture Res. and Ext. Ctr | Berger G.L.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Griffey C.A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | And 26 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2013

'Eve' (Reg. No. CV-350, PI 659067), a six-row, winter hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) developed and tested as VA01H-68 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, was released in May 2007. Eve was derived from the cross SC860974/VA94-42-13 using a modifed bulk-breeding method. It was evaluated in the 2009-2011 Virginia Offcial Variety Trial in replicated tests at fve to six locations. Eve had an average grain yield (3718 kg ha-1) that was higher than those of the hulless check cultivars Dan and Doyce. The average grain volume weight of Eve (73.8 kg hL-1) over the same period was higher than that of Doyce (68.9 kg hL-1). The head emergence of Eve is 6 d earlier than Dan and 'Thoroughbred', which is the predominant barley cultivar grown in the eastern United States. Earlier maturity is a primary factor determining whether barley or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is used in double-cropping systems with soybean (Glycine max L.). The grain of Eve has high starch (60.4%) and protein (10.1%) concentration. Eve is the frst winter hulless barley released in the eastern United States having a high level of resistance to Fusarium head blight [FHB; caused by Fusarium graminearum (Schwabe)] and reduced accumulation of the mycotoxin deoxnivalenol in the grain. Eve's unique grain composition and resistance to FHB make it desirable as a commodity for food, feed, and ethanol production. © Crop Science Society of America.


Hall M.D.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Griffey C.A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Green A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Liu S.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | And 18 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

The potential exists to develop and market hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the eastern United States, where a majority of the mills, bakeries, and consumers reside. The primary objective of this study was to develop adapted and competitive hard winter wheat cultivars possessing high-value traits that offer the potential for new and expanded markets and greater profitability to wheat producers in the eastern United States. 'Vision 40' (Reg. No. CV-1063, PI 661154) hard red winter (HRW) wheat was derived from the cross 92PIN#109/92PAN1#33 and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in March 2010. Vision 40 was developed with a modified bulk-breeding method and was tested as VA06HRW-66 in replicated yield trials in Virginia (2007-2009) and in the eastern region (2008- 2009). Vision 40 is a highyielding, winter hardy, awned, semidwarf (Rht2) having mid- to late-season spike emergence and moderate resistance to diseases prevalent in the mid-Atlantic area with the exception of Fusarium head blight [caused by Fusarium graminearum (Schwabe)]. Vision 40 was the fourth highest yielding HRW wheat entry when averaged over 2 yr of the Uniform Bread Wheat Nursery grown at 11 test sites in 10 states in 2008 and 12 test sites in 9 states in 2009. In comparison with the hard wheat cultivar 'Lakin' (PI 617032), Vision 40 has acceptable end-use quality on the basis of flour yield (70.2 versus 70.3 g 100 g -1), flour protein (9.5 versus 9.5 g 100 g -1), flour water absorption (58.5 versus 59.1 g 100 g -1), dough mixing tolerance (1.7 versus 2.3), pup-loaf volume (823 versus 803 cm 3), and crumb grain scores (3.6 versus 3.7). © Crop Science Society of America.

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