Lincoln, IL, United States
Lincoln, IL, United States

Eastern Illinois University is a state university located in Charleston, Illinois, United States. Established in 1895 as the Eastern Illinois State Normal School, a teacher's college offering a two-year degree, Eastern Illinois University gradually expanded into a comprehensive university with a broad curriculum, including Baccalaureate and Master's degrees in education, business, arts, science, and humanities. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

"Echoes of Tattered Tongues: Memory Unfolded" by John Z. Guzlowski (Aquila Polonica Publishing, 2016) was just named winner of the 2017 Montaigne Medal by the Eric Hoffer Award, which is presented each year to the most thought-provoking books. Los Angeles, CA, May 08, 2017 --( The Montaigne Medal recognizes books that either illuminate, progress, or redirect thought. It is given under the umbrella of the Eric Hoffer Award in honor of the great French philosopher Michel de Montaigne, who influenced people such as William Shakespeare, René Descartes, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Eric Hoffer. The Eric Hoffer Award is one of the largest international book awards for small, academic, and independent presses, http://www.hofferaward.com. "Being awarded the 2017 Montaigne Medal is an incredible honor. My publisher and I are both thrilled with this additional recognition that my book Echoes of Tattered Tongues is one of the most important books published this past year," said author John Guzlowski. "We did not even know that my book was being considered for this award until we were notified several weeks ago that it was one of the finalists." The Montaigne Medal is the second major award won by "Echoes of Tattered Tongues." Last month, this book won the Gold Award for Poetry at the 2017 Benjamin Franklin Awards administered by the Independent Book Publishers Association. In this major tour de force, author John Guzlowski traces the arc of one of the millions of immigrant families of America, in this case, survivors of the maelstrom of World War II. Publishers Weekly describes "Echoes of Tattered Tongues" as "gut-wrenching, narrative lyric poems," and Foreword Reviews called it a "devastating, one-of-a -kind collection." "A searing memoir," said Shelf Awareness, naming the "Echoes of Tattered Tongues" book trailer its Book Trailer of the Day. Kelly Cherry, Poet Laureate of Virginia (2010–2012) said about this book: "Deeply moving. A powerful, lasting, and sometimes shocking book. Superb." Using an innovative weave of poetry and prose, Guzlowski unfolds the story of his own family backwards through time. His parents, young Christian Poles, were taken by Germans to work as slave laborers in German concentration camps, and barely survived. The author and his sister were born in refugee camps in Germany after the war. The family was finally able to immigrate to the United States in 1951 as Displaced Persons, and settled in a tough immigrant neighborhood in Chicago. To learn more: www.polww2.com/AboutEchoes Watch the book trailer: www.polww2.com/EchoesTrailer "This is a haunting look at a virtually unknown aspect of World War II, with impacts that echo through generations and reflections relevant to today’s refugee situation," said Terry Tegnazian, president of Aquila Polonica Publishing. "John Guzlowski’s writing, with its powerful imagery, will stay with you long after you close the book." About John Guzlowski: Guzlowski is Professor Emeritus of English Literature at Eastern Illinois University, and currently lives in Lynchburg, Virginia. He received his B.A. in English Literature from the University of Illinois, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Purdue University.Over a writing career that spans more than 40 years, Guzlowski has amassed a significant body of published work in a wide range of genres: poetry, prose, literary criticism, reviews, fiction and nonfiction. His work has appeared in numerous national journals and anthologies, and in four prior books. Guzlowski’s work has garnered high praise, including from Nobel Laureate Czesław Miłosz, who called Guzlowski’s poetry “exceptional.” Aquila Polonica Publishing, www.AquilaPolonica.com, is an award-winning independent publisher based in Los Angeles, specializing in publishing the Polish WWII experience in English. The company is a member of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) and the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA). Aquila Polonica’s titles are distributed to the trade in the U.S., Canada, U.K., Europe, Australia and New Zealand by National Book Network, www.nbnbooks.com, and are available from fine bookstores, online retailers, and all major wholesalers. Los Angeles, CA, May 08, 2017 --( PR.com )-- "Echoes of Tattered Tongues: Memory Unfolded" by John Z. Guzlowski (Aquila Polonica Publishing, 2016) was just named winner of the 2017 Montaigne Medal by the Eric Hoffer Award, which is presented each year to the most thought-provoking books.The Montaigne Medal recognizes books that either illuminate, progress, or redirect thought. It is given under the umbrella of the Eric Hoffer Award in honor of the great French philosopher Michel de Montaigne, who influenced people such as William Shakespeare, René Descartes, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Eric Hoffer. The Eric Hoffer Award is one of the largest international book awards for small, academic, and independent presses, http://www.hofferaward.com."Being awarded the 2017 Montaigne Medal is an incredible honor. My publisher and I are both thrilled with this additional recognition that my book Echoes of Tattered Tongues is one of the most important books published this past year," said author John Guzlowski. "We did not even know that my book was being considered for this award until we were notified several weeks ago that it was one of the finalists."The Montaigne Medal is the second major award won by "Echoes of Tattered Tongues." Last month, this book won the Gold Award for Poetry at the 2017 Benjamin Franklin Awards administered by the Independent Book Publishers Association.In this major tour de force, author John Guzlowski traces the arc of one of the millions of immigrant families of America, in this case, survivors of the maelstrom of World War II.Publishers Weekly describes "Echoes of Tattered Tongues" as "gut-wrenching, narrative lyric poems," and Foreword Reviews called it a "devastating, one-of-a -kind collection." "A searing memoir," said Shelf Awareness, naming the "Echoes of Tattered Tongues" book trailer its Book Trailer of the Day. Kelly Cherry, Poet Laureate of Virginia (2010–2012) said about this book: "Deeply moving. A powerful, lasting, and sometimes shocking book. Superb."Using an innovative weave of poetry and prose, Guzlowski unfolds the story of his own family backwards through time. His parents, young Christian Poles, were taken by Germans to work as slave laborers in German concentration camps, and barely survived. The author and his sister were born in refugee camps in Germany after the war. The family was finally able to immigrate to the United States in 1951 as Displaced Persons, and settled in a tough immigrant neighborhood in Chicago.To learn more: www.polww2.com/AboutEchoesWatch the book trailer: www.polww2.com/EchoesTrailer"This is a haunting look at a virtually unknown aspect of World War II, with impacts that echo through generations and reflections relevant to today’s refugee situation," said Terry Tegnazian, president of Aquila Polonica Publishing. "John Guzlowski’s writing, with its powerful imagery, will stay with you long after you close the book."About John Guzlowski: Guzlowski is Professor Emeritus of English Literature at Eastern Illinois University, and currently lives in Lynchburg, Virginia. He received his B.A. in English Literature from the University of Illinois, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Purdue University.Over a writing career that spans more than 40 years, Guzlowski has amassed a significant body of published work in a wide range of genres: poetry, prose, literary criticism, reviews, fiction and nonfiction. His work has appeared in numerous national journals and anthologies, and in four prior books. Guzlowski’s work has garnered high praise, including from Nobel Laureate Czesław Miłosz, who called Guzlowski’s poetry “exceptional.”Aquila Polonica Publishing, www.AquilaPolonica.com, is an award-winning independent publisher based in Los Angeles, specializing in publishing the Polish WWII experience in English. The company is a member of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) and the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA). Aquila Polonica’s titles are distributed to the trade in the U.S., Canada, U.K., Europe, Australia and New Zealand by National Book Network, www.nbnbooks.com, and are available from fine bookstores, online retailers, and all major wholesalers. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Aquila Polonica Publishing


He H.,Eastern Illinois University
Coordination Chemistry Reviews | Year: 2014

Near-infrared (NIR, 700-1600nm) emitting lanthanide complexes offer great advantages over the conventional visible light emitting materials for bioimaging and sensing due to the deep penetration of NIR light in the biological fluids and low bleaching effect to the substrates. However, the application has been hampered by their poor NIR emission efficiency and the requirement of short excitation wavelengths. The porphyrin and BODIPY dyes are excellent chromophores with great potential to address these issues due to their unique photophysical properties and structural functionalities. In this review, our recent investigation on synthesis, structural analysis and photophysical properties of their lanthanide complexes is summarized and some important findings are highlighted. We focused on the synthesis and structural characterization of Yb3+, Nd3+ and Er3+ complexes of porphyrin and BODIPY dyes and the impact of structural changes on the NIR emission efficiency. Sensitization mechanism in these complexes is also discussed. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Chesner C.A.,Eastern Illinois University
Quaternary International | Year: 2012

The Toba Caldera in Indonesia is one of the most remarkable volcanic features formed during Quaternary geologic time. Its rich history of research for over a century has yielded important information on the physical volcanology of silicic calderas and super-eruptions, geochemical evolution of silicic magma bodies, and geophysical imaging of active sub-volcanic systems. During the past 1.3 my, the Toba area has erupted intermediate composition lavas, followed by intermediate pyroclastics, three quartz-bearing silicic tuffs, and most recently, intermediate to silicic lavas. This pattern represents the incremental assembly and periodic eruption of a crustal magma body of batholithic proportions. The apparent migration of activity to the west, may have implications for the next? Toba super-eruption. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.


Canivez G.L.,Eastern Illinois University
School Psychology Quarterly | Year: 2014

The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is one of the most frequently used intelligence tests in clinical assessments of children with learning difficulties. Construct validity studies of the WISC-IV have generally supported the higher order structure with four correlated first-order factors and one higher-order general intelligence factor, but recent studies have supported an alternate model in which general intelligence is conceptualized as a breadth factor rather than a superordinate factor (M. W. Watkins, 2010, Structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition among a national sample of referred students, Psychological Assessment, Vol. 22, pp. 782-787; M. W. Watkins, G. L. Canivez, T. James, K. & R. Good, in press, Construct validity of the WISC-IVUK with a large referred Irish sample, International Journal of School and Educational Psychology). WISC-IV core subtest data obtained from evaluations to assess learning difficulties in 345 children (224 boys, 121 girls) were examined. One through four, first order factor models and indirect versus direct hierarchical models were compared using confirmatory factor analyses. The correlated four-factor Wechsler model provided good fit to these data, but the direct hierarchical model showed statistically significant improvement over the indirect hierarchical model and correlated four-factor model. The direct hierarchical model was judged the best explanation of the WISC-IV factor structure, with the general factor accounting for 71.6% of the common variance while the first order factors accounted for 2.4-10.3% of the common variance. Thus, the results with the present sample of referred children were similar to those from other investigations (G. E. Gignac, 2005, Revisiting the factor structure of the WAIS-R: Insights through nested factor modeling, Assessment, Vol. 12, pp. 320-329; G. E. Gignac, 2006, The WAIS-III as a nested factors model: A useful alternative to the more conventional oblique and higher-order models, Journal of Individual Differences, Vol. 27, pp. 73-86; P. Golay, I. Reverte, J. Rossier, N. Favez, & T. Lecerf, 2012, Further insights on the French WISC-IV factor structure through Bayesian structural equation modeling. Psychological Assessment, advance online publication; M. W. Watkins, 2010, Structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition among a national sample of referred students, Psychological Assessment, Vol. 22, pp. 782-787; M. W. Watkins, G. L. Canivez, T. James, K. & R. Good, in press, Construct validity of the WISC-IVUK with a large referred Irish sample, International Journal of School and Educational Psychology) supporting primary interpretation of the Full Scale IQ rather than the factor index scores. © 2013 American Psychological Association.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: SOLID STATE & MATERIALS CHEMIS | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2015

Non-technical Abstract
With the support of the Solid State and Materials Chemistry program in the Division of Materials Research, this project explores how molecular shape impacts the internal organization of crystalline solids. Because material properties intimately relate to the composition of the building-blocks and their alignment, a greater understanding of the factors that influence component interactions holds much importance to the development of advanced materials that exhibit a wide-variety of functional properties. The project is anchored by a research team at Eastern Illinois University and will prove useful for probing the structural boundaries of the recognition process by investigating the complementary shapes of molecular neighbors. The educational and service component of the activity focuses on training students (undergraduate and Masters level) as scientists for careers in STEM fields, developing teaching modules for the introductory organic laboratory, and providing X-ray instrument services to the greater academic community of small colleges and universities that support rigorous undergraduate research programs.


Technical Abstract
Many functions of solid materials require exquisite control over the molecular architectures of their building blocks. The construction of structurally controlled supramolecular assemblies (e.g., bulk solids) is still at a primitive level despite great progress in the chemical synthesis of discrete molecules over the past few decades. This project explores the structural boundaries of molecular shape to the molecular recognition process by using the quasiracemate approach for constructing bimolecular compounds. Chiral building blocks formulated from known organic precursors will be synthesized via diarylamide and Pemoline templates. Since it is well known that a high propensity exists for organic molecules to arrange in centrosymmetric relationships, this activity explores the supramolecular behavior of these molecules to form quasicentrosymmetrically related aggregates. Video-supported thermomicroscopy and calorimetric techniques will be used to investigate the ability of pairs of materials to assemble. X-ray diffraction techniques will help determine the detailed structures of the materials obtained and assist with determining the topological contributions to these molecular assemblies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Integrative Ecologi Physiology | Award Amount: 85.23K | Year: 2015

Water availability has pronounced influences on animal activity and distribution patterns. Drying due to evaporative water loss is the most common mechanism for dehydration, and it is a universal problem confronting terrestrial animals. The majority of animal species do not tolerate severe water stress. This research will address precise mechanisms that protect animals during water stress at levels from the molecular to the organismal. Understanding these protective mechanisms may have translational application for broad scientific communities. For example, the ability for scientists working with important genetic models to prolong the storage of young animal stages by imposing desiccation would be of practical benefit for maintaining these animals more economically. The advantage would extend to national stock centers and teaching laboratories. Engineering desiccation tolerance in dehydration-sensitive organisms is complex, but could provide possibilities for dry storage of valuable live organisms that may be difficult and expensive to maintain in laboratory culture. Further, the biomedical implications of some findings could be significant. Storage of dried cells would increase the availability of replacement cells for many clinical applications and in regenerative medicine. Educationally, the project will facilitate the training of graduate students and undergraduates from a wide diversity of backgrounds. Outreach activities planned as part of the project will contribute to the general education of international scientists (including researchers in biotechnology from the private sector, National Laboratory scientists, and academic faculty wishing to acquire new skills).

This collaborative research will evaluate the impact on desiccation tolerance of multiple Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins originating from anhydrobiotic embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana. The project will refine and expand the understanding of how LEA proteins promote stabilization of targeted biological structures at various hydration states along a continuum from full hydration to water contents of 2% or less. Hypotheses will be tested with isolated macromolecules, liposomes, insect cells lines, and larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. One novel hypothesis is that the function displayed by individual LEA proteins is multifaceted depending upon the severity of desiccation. Such functional plasticity for individual LEA proteins would represent a new paradigm for protection of biological structures as hydration state varies. A new LEA protein from A. franciscana (AfrLEA6), with high sequence homology to a plant LEA protein recently linked to long-term protection against desiccation damage, has been cloned, sequenced and expressed. AfrLEA6 will be stably transfected into insect cell lines to explore whether this protein will extend long-term desiccation tolerance, in the presence and absence of other co-transfected LEA proteins and stabilizing sugars. Finally, fly lines of Drosophila melanogaster will be created that transgenically express multiple LEA proteins. Because larval stages of D. melanogaster naturally contain high endogenous levels of trehalose (a sugar known to provide protection synergistically with LEA proteins), larvae will be used to test for improved tolerance to drying in this species that is generally desiccation-sensitive and does not contain LEA genes in its genome.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Chemical Measurement & Imaging | Award Amount: 267.97K | Year: 2015

With this award, the Chemical Measurement and Imaging Program of the Division of Chemistry is funding Professor Hongshan He of Eastern Illinois University to develop new chemical compounds for bio-imaging and sensing. These compounds can be used to label tissues or other target structures, and after being activated by a light source, emit light, enablingimaging. Professor Hes approach is to develop compounds that (i) do not need to be activated by ultraviolet light as such high energy radiation can damage biological tissues, and (ii) emit light at characteristic wavelengths that are not present in background emissions associated with biological systems. The project aims to provide opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research and gain hands-on research experience. The participation of high school students and science teachers in summer workshops is designed to stimulate student interest in pursuing studies in STEM fields.

Fluorescent materials are used for a variety of biomedical diagnostic applications, such as immunoassays. The significant overlap of biological substrate autofluorescence and fluorescence from commercially available probes dramatically compromises detection sensitivity. This project is aimed to address fundamental questions and such technical issues by developing rationally designed near-infrared emitting lanthanide materials through synthesis, computation, and photophysical studies. The project is focusing on BODIPY-based chromophores and aims to address a long-standing corollary concern of poor near-infrared emission of lanthanide materials in aqueous solutions. To meet the challenge, the lanthanide complexes are to be transformed to metallopolymers through carbon-carbon coupling reactions to suppress quenching and enable efficient near-infrared emission to be retained. The metallopolymers being targeted are designed to emit in the near-infrared region of the spectrum (900-1600 nm) under longer excitation wavelengths,thereby reducing autofluorescence and photobleaching.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ARCTIC SOCIAL SCIENCES | Award Amount: 65.20K | Year: 2016

This project is an archaeological examination of the cultural and ecological factors that contributed to the colonization and settlement of Newfoundland by Maritime Archaic peoples. The Maritime Archaic peoples (ca. 6,000 B.C.-1,000 B.C.) were the first to colonize the Eastern Subarctic and Arctic of North America. They created a way of life that allowed them to successfully occupy the entire coast and near interior of Newfoundland and Labrador for thousands of years, and maintain relationships with contemporaneous cultures that stretched throughout much of northeastern North America. However, we still know very little about their initial settlement of the region, their early social organization, and the ways these processes were affected by ecological factors. The aim of this research is to examine the initial settlement of Newfoundland within the larger context of the peopling of northeastern North America and the roles that historical processes, both cultural and environmental, played in that broader framework. This will include new archaeological excavations at early Maritime Archaic sites in Newfoundland, as well as investigation and analysis of existing Maritime Archaic artifact collections from throughout the region. It will also examine ecological data, such as plant and animal remains, to assess the wider role of environmental change in the initial occupation of the eastern Subarctic and how early cultural adaptations developed within northern coastal and island ecosystems.

This project is an international collaboration of professional archaeologists, graduate students, and undergraduates. The training and education of undergraduate students is a critical component of this project. Moreover, project members will continue to collaborate with local communities to develop economic and preservation initiatives related to the archaeological sites and cultural heritage associated with this research and to create educational opportunities for students and community members in the region.

This research will have extensive implications for our understanding of how and when people first settled the easternmost region of North America, and northern coasts and islands more generally. The earliest human migration onto any landscape is a complex, interactive, and dynamic historical process. In North America, the colonization process is often generalized within an evolutionary perspective that envisions humans simply reacting to ecological opportunities offered by newly available landscapes and resources at the end of the last Ice Age. It is also often framed as solely a Paleoindian process that did not extend far into the Holocene, despite the fact that large portions of northern North America were not colonized until the Middle Holocene. New archaeological fieldwork and collections analysis concerning the Archaic expansion onto and around the island of Newfoundland will inform larger models of human colonization within the region, as well as in other Arctic and Subarctic coastal zones. This includes the initial peopling of North America on the other side of the continent and the role that northern coasts and islands played in that process. It will also help us better understand the interaction between Archaic people and their environment and the adaptation strategies they employed in unknown coastal and island landscapes, as well as the relative impact they had on those environments.

To address these issues the research team will survey and date extant collections to fine-tune the chronological resolution of the initial colonization processes of Newfoundland. They will also conduct new excavations at the Stock Cove and Stock Cove West sites in eastern Newfoundland where Maritime Archaic deposits have been found that appear to stratigraphically correlate to their earliest occupations of the region and that have the first evidence of architecture by Archaic peoples on the island. This will be assessed with a suite of new dates and analyses of material remains recovered from those excavations. Additionally, new geophysical surveys employing ground penetrating radar and magnetometry will be conducted to locate new Archaic deposits to help focus the excavations and noninvasively assess other archaeological deposits that could address the earliest settlement of Newfoundland. Finally, ecological data (e.g. insects, faunal remains, macrobotanicals) will be collected and analyzed to help reconstruct environmental patterns that may have impacted and influenced the peopling and settlement process by the Maritime Archaic.

This project will have broader impacts that include: 1) the first excavation and analysis of a Maritime Archaic structure on the island of Newfoundland; 2) the contribution of important data to our understanding of Archaic social organization and settlement in the eastern Subarctic/Arctic; 3) obtaining key environmental data that will assist with the assessment of environmental change throughout the Holocene and may inform the development of modern policies regarding the mitigation of environmental change and economic impacts (e.g., sea mammal hunting, fishing quotas, wildlife conservation, sea ice extent, coastal erosion); 4) the training of undergraduate students in archaeological field and laboratory methods; 5) international dissemination of our results to both academic and public audiences, and; 6) increased interaction with local communities, regional museums, and other interested parties within Newfoundland and Labrador concerning their heritage and cultural resources, including public lectures and the development of educational tools (e.g., social media, historical markers, pamphlets, booklets) for those communities.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Chemistry of Life Processes | Award Amount: 396.36K | Year: 2016

With this award, the Chemistry of Life Processes in the Chemistry Division is funding Dr. Mary E. Konkle (Department of Chemistry, Eastern Illinois University), Dr. Michael A. Menze (Department of Biological Sciences, Eastern Illinois University), and Dr. Nilay Chakraborty (Department of Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn) to investigate the novel chemical properties of the recently described human protein mitoNEET and their impact on life processes. Energy can be produced through different pathways in cells. How the traffic of fuel through these pathways is directed is still unclear. Evidence suggests that mitoNEET, a novel iron-sulfur containing human protein, regulates the flow of fuel through different pathways in a tissue specific manner. This role directly links chemistry of iron-sulfur proteins to the life process of energy generation. Our integrated approach combines techniques from biochemistry, molecular biology, and bioengineering to address the role of mitoNEET in cells. Students are acquiring training in protein expression, genetic engineering, and cellular imaging provided by the three participating laboratories. Furthermore, the Investigators are extending outreach opportunities to high school students and teachers. This collaboration gives students access to cutting edge molecular research while simultaneously encourages development of diverse talent in the science and engineering pipeline.

MitoNEET was discovered as the first member of the [2Fe-2S]-containing family of CISD proteins in 2004, but the biochemical and physiological function(s) of these proteins are still ill-defined. Knockdown models of mitoNEET have shown that this protein impacts the generation of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in a tissue specific manner. The central hypothesis of this project is that the oxidation state and association of mitoNEET with dehydrogenase enzymes constitutes a tissue specific link between cellular energy metabolism and iron redox chemistry. In three different cell types, the cellular distribution of oxidized and reduced mitoNEET is characterized with the use of Raman interferometry. In addition, the impact of mitoNEET binding on allosteric control of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and the cellular functions of cytoplasmic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are characterized through a range of cellular experiments. The project goals are to elucidate the mechanisms by which mitoNEET modulates cellular energy production through regulation of iron homeostasis and control of carbon flux through dehydrogenase enzymes in various tissue types.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS | Award Amount: 13.17K | Year: 2016

This award supports the Eastern Illinois Integrated Conference in Geometry, Dynamics, and Topology, which will occur the weekend of April 15-17, 2016, at Eastern Illinois University. This conference is integrated in the sense that it draws participants at every stage of their mathematical careers, with particular focus on both early-career graduate students and undergraduates. A meeting of this type brings together researchers from the academically young to the well-established, yet offers a more narrow research focus than is typically found at undergraduate-inclusive conferences. This narrow focus serves to promote more meaningful contact in the context of mathematical research. The conference is intended to fuel young mathematicians interest in research mathematics, promote inter- and intra-generational research ties, and demonstrate how undergraduates can be incorporated into research programs in these fields.

Three established speakers and three early-career speakers are invited by the organizing committee; these speakers are chosen both for their eminence in their respective fields and their ability to provide meaningful introductions to complex topics for audiences with a wide range of mathematical backgrounds. Invitations for submissions by graduate students and undergraduate students will be issued in mid-February. Submitted abstracts will be reviewed by subject-specific committees composed of faculty at Eastern Illinois University. Up to 6 graduate students and between 12 and 15 undergraduates will be invited to make presentations, either as talks or in poster sessions. In addition to the talks and poster sessions, the conference provides opportunities for less formal interaction, including social events on Friday and Saturday nights. Our increased focus on incorporating undergraduates into professional life includes panel discussions from funded graduate students and early-career mathematicians covering important but seldom-discussed aspects of attending graduate school and pursuing an academic career in mathematics.

More information will be available at the conference website: https://ux1.eiu.edu/~gdt/2016.html

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