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Jong Y.A.D.,Eastern Africa Primate Diversity and Conservation Program | Butynski T.M.,Eastern Africa Primate Diversity and Conservation Program | Butynski T.M.,King Khalid Wildlife Research Center
Primate Conservation | Year: 2010

The design and implementation of effective conservation measures for primates requires an efficient and accessible resource for the identification of species and subspecies. A total of 487 photographs (June 2010) on five on-line maps, called 'Photographic Maps' (or 'PhotoMaps'), present the phenotypic characters for 15 species and 26 subspecies of primates at 82 sites in Kenya and Tanzania. The PhotoMaps, at , provide a 'living' collection of photographs. More photographs will be uploaded as they become available. PhotoMaps are a practical tool for documenting and discussing primate diversity, taxonomy, biogeography, distribution and conservation status and, therefore, for developing and implementing actions for primate conservation. The use of photographs to document phenotypic characters will become increasingly important as the collection of specimens for hands-on assessments becomes ever more difficult. Source


Jong Y.A.D.,Eastern Africa Primate Diversity and Conservation Program | Butynski T.M.,Eastern Africa Primate Diversity and Conservation Program | Butynski T.M.,King Khalid Wildlife Research Center
Primate Conservation | Year: 2010

Hybridization in the wild between broadly sympatric species has been reported for 13 species of African primates. Three guenons, believed to be Sykes's monkey Cercopithecus mitis ×E - vervet monkey Chlorocebus pygerythrus hybrids, are reported here; two at Diani on the south coast of Kenya and one at Ngong Forest Sanctuary, Nairobi. These are the first records of hybridization between these broadly sympatric species, as well as between these genera. Most of the phenotypic characters of these hybrids are intermediate between the parent species. This paper (1) describes these hybrids and the environments in which they live; (2) briefly reviews hybridization among Africa's primates; (3) describes scent-marking behavior by one of the hybrids; (4) briefly reviews scent-marking among Africa's monkeys; (5) discusses the environmental circumstances that may weaken genetic barriers and facilitate hybridization; and (6) suggests topics for research on the ecology, behavior, and evolutionary significance of these three hybrids. Source

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