Johnson City, TN, United States

East Tennessee State University

www.etsu.edu
Johnson City, TN, United States

East Tennessee State University is an accredited American university located in Johnson City, Tennessee. It is part of the Tennessee Board of Regents system of colleges and universities, the nation's sixth largest system of public education, and is the fourth largest university in the state. ETSU has off-campus centers in nearby Kingsport and Elizabethton.Listed by The Princeton Review as one of America’s Best Value Colleges, ETSU has a host of programs that benefit both the region and nation, including the Quillen College of Medicine, consistently ranked as one of the top schools nationwide for rural medicine and primary care education, the Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, and the recently formed College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health science. Unique programs include a nationally acclaimed and accredited program in Bluegrass, Old Time, and Country Music, the nation's lone master's degree in Storytelling, and the Appalachian Studies programs, focused on the surrounding Appalachian region.ETSU had a record enrollment of over 15,000 students in Fall 2010.In 2011, ETSU had its 100th anniversary. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Patent
Cyberonics and East Tennessee State University | Date: 2017-02-01

Systems and methods are provided for delivering neurostimulation therapies to patients for treating chronic heart failure. A neural fulcrum zone is identified and ongoing neurostimulation therapy is delivered within the neural fulcrum zone. The implanted stimulation device includes a physiological sensor for monitoring the patients response to the neurostimulation therapy on an ambulatory basis over extended periods of time, and a control system for adjusting stimulation parameters to maintain stimulation in the neural fulcrum zone based on detected changes in the physiological response to stimulation.


Means R.T.,East Tennessee State University
Blood | Year: 2016

Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a syndrome defined by a normocytic normochromic anemia with severe reticulocytopenia and marked reduction or absence of erythroid precursors from the bone marrow. Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a congenital form of PRCA. Acquired PRCA may be either a primary disorder or secondary to some other disorder or agent. Primary acquired PRCA is an autoimmune disorder that is frequently antibody-mediated. Myelodys-plastic syndromes may also present with the morphologic appearance of PRCA. Secondary acquired PRCA may be associated with collagen vascular/autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus; lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia or large granular lymphocyte leukemia; infections, particularly B19 parvovirus; thymoma and other solid tumors; or a variety of other disorders, drugs, or toxic agents. The therapeutic approach to PRCA typically involves immunosuppression, but specific pathogenic subtypes are associated with specific therapeutic approaches. Cyclosporine A, with or without concurrent corticosteroids, appears to be the single most effective immunosuppressive agent. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.


Kumar D.,East Tennessee State University
Plant Science | Year: 2014

Salicylic acid (SA) is a key plant hormone that mediates host responses against microbial pathogens. Identification and characterization of SA-interacting/binding proteins is a topic which has always excited scientists studying microbial defense response in plants. It is likely that discovery of a true receptor for SA may greatly advance understanding of this important signaling pathway. SABP2 with its high affinity for SA was previously considered to be a SA receptor. Despite a great deal work we may still not have true a receptor for SA. It is also entirely possible that there may be more than one receptor for SA. This scenario is more likely given the diverse role of SA in various physiological processes in plants including, modulation of opening and closing of stomatal aperture, flowering, seedling germination, thermotolerance, photosynthesis, and drought tolerance. Recent identification of NPR3, NPR4 and NPR1 as potential SA receptors and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHE2), several glutathione S transferases (GSTF) such as SA binding proteins have generated more interest in this field. Some of these SA binding proteins may have direct/indirect role in plant processes other than pathogen defense signaling. Development and use of new techniques with higher specificity to identify SA-interacting proteins have shown great promise and have resulted in the identification of several new SA interactors. This review focuses on SA interaction/binding proteins identified so far and their likely role in mediating plant defenses. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Patent
Cyberonics and East Tennessee State University | Date: 2016-09-16

Systems and methods are provided for delivering neurostimulation therapies to patients for treating chronic heart failure. A neural fulcrum zone is identified and ongoing neurostimulation therapy is delivered within the neural fulcrum zone. The implanted stimulation device includes a physiological sensor for monitoring the patients response to the neurostimulation therapy on an ambulatory basis over extended periods of time and a control system for adjusting stimulation parameters to maintain stimulation in the neural fulcrum zone based on detected changes in the physiological response to stimulation.


Patent
Cyberonics and East Tennessee State University | Date: 2016-08-12

Systems and methods are provided for delivering neurostimulation therapies to patients for treating chronic heart failure. A neural fulcrum zone is identified and ongoing neurostimulation therapy is delivered within the neural fulcrum zone. The implanted stimulation device includes a physiological sensor for recording the patients response to the neurostimulation therapy on an ambulatory basis over extended periods of time.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ALGEBRA,NUMBER THEORY,AND COM | Award Amount: 20.99K | Year: 2017

The 31st Annual Workshop on Automorphic Forms and Related Topics (AFW) will take place March 6-9, 2017 at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, Tennessee. The AFW is an internationally recognized, well-respected conference on topics related to automorphic forms, which have played a key role in many recent breakthroughs in mathematics. Continuing a three-decade long tradition, the AFW will bring together a geographically diverse group of participants at a wide range of career stages, from graduate students to senior professors. Typically, about half of the attendees at the AFW are at early stages of their careers, and about one quarter to one third of participants are women. The AFW will continue to provide a supportive and encouraging environment for giving talks, exchanging ideas, and beginning new collaborations. In addition to the research talks, the AFW will - like in past years - have two professional development panels on topics such as good mathematical writing, early career development, and transitioning from one career stage to the next. Furthermore, for the first time at AFW, there will be a speed session in which participants (primarily junior mathematicians) present short talks about current research projects which may still be in preliminary stages.

Automorphic forms constitute a major area of study in number theory and related areas. One of the goals of the AFW is to promote new interactions and collaborations between researchers working in different areas concerning automorphic forms. Thus, the workshop will highlight a wide range of developments in areas including the analytic, algebraic, combinatorial, and p-adic theory of automorphic forms and related topics such as L-functions. Automorphic forms have played a key role in many breakthroughs in mathematics, including the proofs of Fermats Last Theorem (by Andrew Wiles), Serres Conjecture (by Chandrashekhar Khare, Mark Kisin, and Jean-Pierre Wintenberger), the Sato-Tate Conjecture (by Thomas Barnet-Lamb, David Geraghty, Michael Harris, and Richard Taylor), Serres Uniformity Conjecture (by Yuri Bilu and Pierre Parent),the Monstrous Moonshine Conjecture (for which Borcherds was awarded the Fields Medal), and the Fundamental Lemma (for which Ngo Bau Chau was awarded the Fields Medal). The topics covered in this years workshop are likely to include Bianchi, elliptic, Jacobi, Hilbert, and Siegel modular forms, elliptic curves and abelian varieties, special values of L-functions, p-adic aspects of L-functions and automorphic forms, connections with representation theory, mock modular forms, quadratic forms, and additional related areas of research.

Website:http://automorphicformsworkshop.org/


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Integrative Ecologi Physiology | Award Amount: 679.99K | Year: 2015

Disturbance in the natural growth habitat causes stress responses in plants that enable them to resist, tolerate or adapt to these changes. Such stress responses often involve activation of a network of metabolic signals. The main objective of this project is to study the metabolism and role of a unique lipid metabolite called anandamide in the development of dehydration tolerance in moss plants. Anandamide typically occurs in mammals, and has not been reported in higher plants, despite its occurrence in mosses. In mammals, this compound is involved in neuronal signaling, raising the possibility that it also acts as a signal in mosses. Moss plants are naturally tolerant to many stresses and this study is expected to determine if the unique lipids present in mosses, but absent in higher plants, play a role in the greater dehydration tolerance shown by mosses. The findings from this study will reveal novel functional and evolutionary insights into lipid-mediated biological responses that may be widely applicable in plants. Such insights may lead to development of strategies to generate stress tolerant crop plants in the future, helping to maintain food production during droughts and on marginal lands. The project also offers much needed research opportunities to graduate and undergraduate students and a research associate at East Tennessee State University, which is a primarily undergraduate institution that attracts many regional, first-generation students from the Appalachian region.

N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a class of fatty acid derivatives that are widely distributed among eukaryotes. Among the various types of NAEs, anandamide is known to bind to cannabinoid receptors and acts as a neuromodulator for a variety of physiological processes in mammals. Recently, anandamide, a 20-carbon, polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid ethanolamide (NAE 20:4) was identified in moss plants but not in higher plants. This discovery has opened the possibility that NAEs in early land plants may play a unique role that is akin to that in animals and beyond what is known in flowering plants. The presence of unconventional lipids in bryophytes has long been considered crucial for their successful transition from water to land because lipids may have imparted them with natural ability to resist high temperatures and tolerate osmotic and salt stresses and dehydration. Therefore, it is hypothesized that mosses may have evolutionarily retained unique NAE metabolites, such as anandamide, and mechanisms by which they mediate stress tolerance. To address this premise, three main objectives will be pursued, using Physcomitrella patens: 1) Biochemically and molecularly characterize the NAE metabolic pathway, 2) Determine NAE metabolite profiles and their effects on development, and 3) Elucidate the physiological role of NAEs in abscisic acid-mediated dehydration tolerance. Studies will take advantage of discoveries made in other eukaryotic systems, including the enzymes that regulate NAE metabolic pathway and lipid-profiling techniques. Long-term goals of the project are to elucidate the mechanisms by which mosses maintain tolerance to abiotic stress, which perhaps may have been altered or lost in vascular plants, and reveal novel functional and evolutionary insights into lipid-mediated biological responses in plants.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 299.43K | Year: 2016

A growing body of evidence indicates that computer simulations can be particularly effective tools for developing a students conceptual understanding of STEM topics and for engaging students in problem solving. The significance of this project is that it will provide an open, interactive, and biologically realistic environment around which faculty can design their own curriculum and can adopt various vehicles for delivering it (e.g. interactive lecture examples and in-class experiments, pre/post lab exercises, or full simulation-based lab exercises). The model themes of Virtual Biology Lab (VBL) directly address four of the important components of biology undergraduate education as highlighted in Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: two of the core concepts, evolution and biological systems and two of the core competencies, the ability to apply the process of science and the ability to use modeling and simulation when gathering data and analyzing biological processes.

The VBL website, www.virtualbiologylab.org, developed under a previous NSF award currently hosts 20 simulation models of classic experiments and concepts in ecology and evolutionary biology, all of which are free for use for educational purposes. The models promote inquiry by providing open environments in which students can manipulate parameters and observe the effects on simulated populations. The site averages over 2800 unique sessions per month, but existing models only run on PCs. This phase will expand accessibility to all web-platforms, and continue to provide free use of models. The developers will: 1) redevelop current and new models in HTML5 maintaining accessibility for the foreseeable future; 2) consult educators during model development maximizing their efficacy as learning tools; 3) robustly assess simulation models as learning tools; 4) create a professional website to host the models and facilitate a community of users; and, 5) raise awareness of the resource among biology faculty. The assessment of the learning experience will involve several hundred students from three institutions (a selective R1 university, a regional university, and a community college). The study will compare learning gains of students using the new and old interfaces. A matched pair design will be used to determine if a more modern game-like interface enhances, detracts from, or does not affect student learning. Answering this question is important because considerable time and effort in software development can be spent keeping up with the state of the art. In addition, this would add general data on the efficacy of simulation models as learning tools.


This project is funded jointly by the Directorate for Biological Sciences, Division of Biological Infrastructure and the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, Division of Undergraduate Education in support of efforts to address the challenges posed in Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action (http://visionandchange.org/files/2013/11/aaas-VISchange-web1113.pdf).


Patent
Cyberonics and East Tennessee State University | Date: 2016-08-05

Systems and methods are provided for delivering neurostimulation therapies to patients for treating chronic heart failure. A neural fulcrum zone is identified and ongoing neurostimulation therapy is delivered within the neural fulcrum zone. This neural fulcrum zone corresponds to a combination of stimulation parameters at which autonomic engagement is achieved, while the tachycardia-inducing stimulation effects are offset by the bradycardia-inducing effects, thereby minimizing side effects such as significant heart rate changes while providing a therapeutic level of stimulation.


Patent
Cyberonics and East Tennessee State University | Date: 2015-09-22

Systems and methods are provided for delivering neurostimulation therapies to patients for treating chronic heart failure. A neural fulcrum zone is identified and ongoing neurostimulation therapy is delivered within the neural fulcrum zone. The implanted stimulation device includes a physiological sensor for monitoring the patients response to the neurostimulation therapy on an ambulatory basis over extended periods of time and a control system for adjusting stimulation parameters to maintain stimulation in the neural fulcrum zone based on detected changes in the physiological response to stimulation.

Loading East Tennessee State University collaborators
Loading East Tennessee State University collaborators