East Saint Louis, OK, United States

East Central University

www.ecok.edu
East Saint Louis, OK, United States

East Central University is a four-year public university in Ada, Oklahoma, located in the south central region of the state. The university also has courses available in McAlester, Shawnee, Ardmore, and Durant.The university began in 1909 as a normal school that taught high school and college classes. Some of its more famous alumni include former NFL player Mark Gastineau, past governors Robert S. Kerr and George Nigh, former U.S. Representative Lyle Boren, Oklahoma Supreme Court Justice Tom Colbert, and U.S. Army General James D. Thurman. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of Oklahoma’s best colleges and universities for 2017. Of the 26 four-year schools that made the list, Oklahoma City University, University of Tulsa, University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, Oklahoma State University and Oklahoma Christian University ranked as the top five. Of the 14 two-year schools that were also included, Tulsa Community College, Western Oklahoma State College, Northern Oklahoma College, Rose State College and Murray State College were the top five. A list of all schools is included below. “A strong economy begins with a strong workforce, and these Oklahoma schools have shown that they offer a high-caliber education that sets graduates up for success in the job market after graduation,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. To be included on Oklahoma’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional metrics that includes the number of career and academic resources available, annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, financial aid, student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Oklahoma” list, visit: Oklahoma’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Bacone College Cameron University East Central University Langston University Mid-America Christian University Northeastern State University Northwestern Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Baptist University Oklahoma Christian University Oklahoma City University Oklahoma Panhandle State University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oklahoma Wesleyan University Oral Roberts University Randall University Rogers State University Southeastern Oklahoma State University Southern Nazarene University Southwestern Christian University Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Gregory’s University University of Central Oklahoma University of Oklahoma-Health Sciences Center University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma University of Tulsa Oklahoma’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Carl Albert State College College of the Muscogee Nation Comanche Nation College Connors State College Eastern Oklahoma State College Murray State College Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College Northern Oklahoma College Oklahoma City Community College Redlands Community College Rose State College Seminole State College Tulsa Community College Western Oklahoma State College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has selected Oklahoma’s best online colleges and universities for 2017. Based on an analysis of government-supplied data, 23 four-year schools are honored, with University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, Oral Roberts University, Oklahoma State University, University of Tulsa and University of Central Oklahoma taking the top five. 12 two-year colleges are also recognized, with Tulsa Community College, Northern Oklahoma College, Murray State College, Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College and Rose State College coming in as the top five. “Students in Oklahoma have a lot of options when it comes to earning a certificate or degree, but the schools on our list have distinguished themselves as being the best of the best when it comes to online education,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “In addition to providing exceptional learning opportunities, these schools also provide outstanding academic resources for online students.” To earn a spot on the Community for Accredited Online Schools list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also judged based on data points such as financial aid availability, student resources, counseling services, student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Oklahoma for 2017 include the following: Cameron University East Central University Langston University Mid-America Christian University Northeastern State University Northwestern Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Baptist University Oklahoma Christian University Oklahoma City University Oklahoma Panhandle State University Oklahoma State University-Main Campus Oklahoma Wesleyan University Oral Roberts University Randall University Rogers State University Southeastern Oklahoma State University Southern Nazarene University Southwestern Christian University Southwestern Oklahoma State University University of Central Oklahoma University of Oklahoma-Health Sciences Center University of Oklahoma-Norman Campus University of Tulsa The Best Online Two-Year Schools in Oklahoma for 2017 include the following: Carl Albert State College Connors State College Eastern Oklahoma State College Murray State College Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College Northern Oklahoma College Oklahoma City Community College Redlands Community College Rose State College Seminole State College Tulsa Community College Western Oklahoma State College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


Choudry Q.,East Central University
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics Part B | Year: 2017

In the UK, the Pavlik harness is generally the accepted treatment technique for the treatment of neonatal and infant pathological developmental dysplasia of the hip. In 2013, the success rate of the Pavlik harness became an outcome measure from the British Society of Children’s Orthopaedic Surgery for appraisal and revalidation with the GMC for paediatric orthopaedic surgery. The standard set requires an 80% success rate, with less than 20% requiring surgery. This study evaluated the outcomes of Pavlik harness treatment in neonates/infants with ‘pathological hips’ diagnosed by ultrasound imaging in a district general hospital setting. In a 10-year prospective observational longitudinal cohort study, modified Graf type III and IV hips (excluding those presenting with irreducible hip dislocation) were classified as pathological and splinted. A total of 2826 neonates/infants underwent ultrasound assessment in the paediatric orthopaedic ‘screening clinic’. Neonates and infants were referred as ‘at-risk’ or as clinically unstable by the Paediatric Department and by general practitioners. Thirty-one Graf type III and 95 Graf type IV hips were identified and treated with a Pavlik harness. One Graf type III (30/31=success rate 96.8%) and three clinically unstable Graf type IV hips progressed to irreducible hip dislocations (92/95=96.8%). The success rate of the Pavlik harness in Graf type III and IV dysplasia was 96.8%, with 3.2% requiring surgery because of progression of the condition, confirming acceptable results for this technique in a district general hospital setting. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Klippenstine M.A.,East Central University | Schuller R.,York University
Psychology, Crime and Law | Year: 2012

The present research examined how expectancies for a complainant's emotional response and the consistency of her emotional response over time impact perceptions of sexual assault. Participants (N = 124) were given one of four trial summaries in which the victim's emotional response (i.e. tearful/upset, calm/controlled) was varied at two points in time (i.e. day following the alleged assault, during trial). Similar to past findings, more support for the victim's claim was evidenced when she was portrayed as tearful/upset as opposed to calm/controlled, with participants' perceptions negatively influenced by emotional information that was incongruent with what would be considered typical of a sexual assault victim. Further analyses revealed, however, that emotions displayed at different points interacted to influence perceptions, with the consistently responding victim tending to receive more support for her claim than the victim who responded inconsistently over time. Mediation analyses revealed that the impact of the victim's emotional response on perceptions was mediated by the perceived typicality of her response. Implications of the research suggest, for both psychological and legal professionals alike, that it is incumbent upon those receiving information regarding a rape victim's emotional response to be more aware of its limited value and its potential prejudicial impact. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Hutson A.,East Central University | Ko S.,National Research Council Italy | Huling S.G.,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Chemosphere | Year: 2012

Chemical oxidation regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that can be carried out utilizing thermally-activated persulfate. During chemical regeneration of GAC, aggressive oxidative conditions lead to high acidity (pH < 2) and the accumulation of sodium persulfate residuals in the GAC. In this study, we investigated the impact of chemical oxidation on the sorption characteristics of methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) in GAC. Loss of MTBE sorption was measured in thermally-activated persulfate regenerated GAC. The accumulation of sulfur was partially responsible for the blockage of sorption sites, but sorption loss was amplified under oxidizing and acidic conditions and attributed to the formation of acidic surface oxides and enhanced electrostatic attraction and accumulation of SO42- in GAC. Raising the pH in the GAC slurry resulted in the removal of the residual sulfate and improved MTBE sorption indicating that the mechanisms responsible for MTBE sorption loss were reversible. These results establish baseline conditions and parameters that can be used to optimize pilot- and full-scale deployment of thermally-activated persulfate regeneration of GAC. © 2012.


Jacobson N.S.,NASA | Myers D.L.,East Central University
Journal of Physical Chemistry B | Year: 2011

The vaporization of B2O3 in a reducing environment leads to the formation of both B2O3(g) and B 2O2(g). Whereas the formation of B2O 3(g) is well understood, many questions about the formation of B 2O2(g) remain. Previous studies using B(s) + B 2O3(l) have led to inconsistent thermodynamic data. In this study, it was found that, after heating, B(s) and B2O 3(l) appeared to separate and variations in contact area likely led to the inconsistent vapor pressures of B2O2(g). To circumvent this problem, the activity of boron was fixed with a two-phase mixture of FeB and Fe2B. Both second-and third-law enthalpies of formation were measured for B2O2(g) and B 2O3(g). From these values, the enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K were calculated to be -479.9 ± 25.7 kJ/mol for B 2O2(g) and -833.4 ± 13.1 kJ/mol for B 2O3(g). Ab initio calculations to determine the enthalpies of formation of B2O2(g) and B2O3(g) were conducted using the W1BD composite method and showed good agreement with the experimental values. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Jacobson N.S.,NASA | Myers D.L.,East Central University
Oxidation of Metals | Year: 2011

Silicon carbide (SiC) forms a protective condensed-phase oxide (SiO 2) in passive oxidation and a volatile sub-oxide (SiO(g)) in active oxidation. The transition between these two modes of oxidation and the rates of active oxidation are critical issues. A literature review indicates that impurity effects, the difference between active-to-passive and passive-to-active transitions, and the effect of total pressure on these transitions remain unexplored for SiC. Measurements were made in a thermogravimetric apparatus (TGA) by changing oxygen potentials either by blending O 2/Ar mixtures or changing total pressures in a pure oxygen gas stream to the point where a transition occurs. Specimens were examined with standard optical and electron-optical techniques. Active-to-passive and passive-to-active transitions were measured and found to be similar for SiC, which is in contrast to pure Si. The similarity in SiC is attributed to SiC/SiO 2 interfacial reactions producing the necessary conditions for passive scale formation (active-to-passive) or passive scale breakdown (passive-to-active). Comparable results were obtained in both the O 2/Ar and reduced total O 2 pressure cases for SiC. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA).


Lenti L.,East Central University | Martino S.,University of Rome La Sapienza
Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering | Year: 2010

The here proposed LEMA_DES (Levelled-Energy Multifrequential Analysis for Dynamic Equivalent Signals) procedure is a new approach for defining multifrequential dynamic equivalent signals from real accelerograms, to be applied for physic-analogue and numerical geotechnical modelling of induced seismic effects. In this approach, the resulting equivalent signals satisfy criteria of spectral, energetic and kinematic equivalence to the related real prototypes. The approach was tested to analyse the accelerometric records of the November 23rd, 1980 Irpinia (Italy) earthquake. Based on 48 selected records, correlations were studied between the characteristic parameters of both real and equivalent signals. These correlations demonstrate that the proposed approach guarantees: i) the energy equivalence of the derived signals, except for a half order of magnitude, and ii) the equivalence of the peak ground acceleration (PGA) values with relative errors below 105%. The computed relative error on the cumulative energy of the LEMA_DES signals (Δr Veq%), which have spectral amplitudes at frequencies lower than 1 Hz, drops below 30%, while the same error increases above 2500%, in the same frequency range, for sinusoidal signals obtained according to traditional approaches. The PGAs of the LEMA_DES signals show a good fit with the PGA attenuation law proposed for the central-southern Apennines. Correlations between the Arias intensities and PGAs of the equivalent signals with respect to the actual ones demonstrate that their characteristic parameters: i) well represent the spatial variation in terms of energy and ground motion; ii) reproduce an analogue earthquake scenario with respect to the reference seismic event. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Harder B.,NASA | Jacobson N.,NASA | Myers D.,East Central University
Journal of the American Ceramic Society | Year: 2013

Oxidation of SiC can occur in a passive mode, where a protective film is generated, or in an active mode, where a volatile suboxide is generated. The transitions from active-to-passive and passive-to-active are particularly important to understand as they occur via different mechanisms. In Part II of this article, the passive-to-active transition is explored. Three different types of SiC are examined - Si-rich SiC, stoichiometric SiC, and C-rich SiC. In addition to an in situ transition from passive-to-active, the effect of a preformed film on all three types of SiC is explored. It appears that the passive-to-active transition occurs when the SiO2 scale begins to react with the SiC substrate. This reaction generates SiO(g) and CO(g), which build pressure beneath the SiO2 scale, eventually causing the oxide to rupture. In addition, the SiO(g) can oxidize a distance away from the surface leading to the formation of SiO2 needles and further promoting this SiO2/SiC reaction. Thermodynamic and kinetic data are used to predict transition pressures of oxygen, which show reasonable agreement with those measured. © 2012 The American Ceramic Society.


Jacobson N.,NASA | Harder B.,NASA | Myers D.,East Central University
Journal of the American Ceramic Society | Year: 2013

Oxidation of SiC can occur in a passive mode where a protective film is generated or in an active mode where a volatile suboxide is generated and can lead to rapid material consumption. The transition between these two modes of oxidation is a critical issue. Evidence indicates that this transition occurs via a different mechanism for the active-to-passive transition as compared with that of the passive-to-active transition. In Part I of this article, the former (active-to-passive mode) is explored. Three different types of SiC are examined: Si-rich SiC, stoichiometric SiC, and C-rich SiC. Evidence suggests that the SiO2/SiC equilibrium requirements as well as formation of SiO(g) at the SiC surface and subsequent oxidation to SiO2(s) are critical issues in the active-to-passive transition. © 2012 The American Ceramic Society.

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