Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Oakland, CA, United States

Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 58.00K | Year: 2010

This award provides support for two workshops to identify emerging themes and directions for potential research resulting from the magnitude 7.0 January 12, 2010, Haiti earthquake and the magnitude 8.8 February 27, 2010, Chile earthquake. These two earthquakes are among the top five earthquakes in recorded history in terms of number of fatalities and magnitude size. The Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) will organize these workshops to explore needed research and data gathering opportunities from these two major seismic events. EERI has a long and successful history of organizing workshops following major important earthquakes. EERI staff will organize, plan, and manage the workshops, and then prepare and disseminate reports summarizing workshop results and research recommendations. Both the Haiti and Chile earthquakes present major learning opportunities of different types for the U.S. engineering and scientific communities. The Haiti earthquake has research lessons emerging from the response and rebuilding. The complex and devastating nature of that disaster will shape these lessons across many disciplines. A different set of research needs and lessons will emerge from Chile, which is one of the most significant earthquakes for the U.S. earthquake engineering community in the last several decades. Building codes in Chile are similar to those used in the United States for concrete and steel buildings; there are strong motion records that provide important data; the geologic setting is similar to the Pacific Northwest; there are similarities and lessons from the transportation, lifelines, and critical facilities sectors; and there are similar social and public policy issues in the response and recovery. The workshop on the Chilean earthquake will be held at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Arlington, VA, on August 19, 2010; the workshop on the Haitian earthquake will be held at NSF on September 30-October 1, 2010. Each workshop will be led by an organizing steering committee and include participants who conducted post-earthquake investigations for the event through NSF-supported RAPID or similar awards, and invited collaborators from the affected country.

Objectives and Broader Impacts: The objective of these two workshops is to identify major research themes and directions emerging from the 2010 earthquakes in Haiti and Chile. Workshop participants will identify these directions to guide NSFs programs for future research related to these events. Participants will define major lessons and opportunities for further research across a range of disciplines, including topics that are multi- and cross-disciplinary in nature. Transformative and cross-cultural research areas will be identified, where appropriate. Recommendations from these two workshops will be shared widely with the broader research and practicing earthquake engineering communities through EERIs clearinghouse website (http://www.eeri.org), EERI newsletter, and NSF (http://www.nsf.gov) and NEHRP (http://www.nehrp.gov) websites.

Intellectual Merit: These workshops will draw on world-recognized experts in a wide range of disciplines related to earthquake and disaster research, mitigation, response and recovery. Their interaction and synergy in the workshops will result in an intellectually rigorous set of recommendations for future research that identifies opportunities for linkages across disciplines and topics, and clearly illuminates the most important directions for research emerging from these major earthquakes.

This award is co-funded by the Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation and the Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems and is part of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP).


The 11 March 2011 magnitude 9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquake, with its ensuing tsunami, surprised many in the research and practicing professions. An earthquake of this size was not anticipated; the Japan Trench subduction zone had been assumed capable of a magnitude 8.0 earthquake but not much greater. Early reports indicate the constructed environment survived the ground shaking reasonably well given the magnitude of the event. However, the tsunami overpowered coastal defenses and caused wide-spread devastation along Japans northeast coast. This event is an important learning opportunity for U.S. researchers due to (1) the many similarities between this event and a possible Cascadia subduction zone earthquake and tsunami that could affect western U.S. coastal communities and (2) the paucity of knowledge currently available on the effects of a catastrophic disaster in a developed country with many engineered structures designed or retrofitted for earthquake loads. The U.S. and Japan are both highly industrialized and advanced economies with many commonalities in their built infrastructure. This Rapid Response Research (RAPID) award builds on the Earthquake Engineering Research Institutes (EERI) long-term relationships with Japanese researchers and practicing engineers to organize the rapid collection of perishable data and early field reconnaissance from this 2011 event as a fully collaborative effort. Researchers supported on this award will team directly with respective Japanese colleagues to undertake field investigations followed by jointly authored reports. The primary collaborating organizations are the Architectural Institute of Japan, the Disaster Prevention Research Institute at Kyoto University, and the Japan Association for Earthquake Engineering. Three research themes have been identified for the rapid collection of perishable data: transportation systems, particularly bridges; engineered buildings, including the large inventory of retrofitted structures and use of modern technologies such as base isolation; and government and community response, in the areas of emergency response, social capital, institutional frameworks, and rebuilding, for a disaster of this extraordinary scale and complexity.

The data from this reconnaissance will be used to advance knowledge in seismic bridge retrofit and design requirements; seismic performance of structures with protective systems and concrete and steel buildings; and resilience, response, and recovery for a catastrophic event. Findings from the reconnaissance investigations will be shared widely with the broader research and practicing earthquake engineering community through EERIs clearinghouse web site, short research summaries posted on the clearinghouse and in inserts to the EERI monthly newsletter, and a web cast.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 30.00K | Year: 2010

This award provides travel support to China for five U.S. academic researchers and two Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) representatives on the twenty-one member U.S. team to participate in the first China/USA Symposium for the Advancement of Earthquake Sciences and Hazard Mitigation Practices. This symposium is in response to a request from the President of the Chinese Academy of Sciences to conduct a joint scientific exchange on earthquake hazard mitigation with invited U.S. expertise. The one-day symposium in Beijing, China and two-day field trip to the epicentral area of the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan, China earthquake will be held from 19 to 21 October 2010. Two days of informal meetings with key Chinese government agencies and researchers working in earthquake-related fields will be held during the week of the symposium/field trip. The symposium/field trip is co-sponsored by EERI and the Chinese Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii. EERI will administer the travel grant, coordinate travel arrangements, and handle all administrative procedures involved.

Broader Impacts: The symposium will advance earthquake sciences and hazard mitigation practices in both China and the U.S., establish a baseline of state of the art earthquake engineering practices, and identify areas for future research of common interest, while enhancing cooperation and mutual understanding between the two countries.

Intellectual Merit: In this symposium, expert earthquake scientists, engineers, and hazard mitigation practitioners from China and the U.S. will meet and collaborate to identify and discuss the approaches and research taken by both countries to address common issues in earthquake hazard mitigation. This first meeting will help identify areas of future research and facilitate a continuing exchange of useful scientific, engineering, and planning knowledge and experience that could lead to safer buildings and reduced casualties in future earthquakes. The symposium and related meeting functions enable a multi-disciplinary team from the U.S. to interact with a very broad range of Chinese officials and researchers in the key ministries, universities, and institutes dealing with earthquake research, development of codes and standards, planning, hazard mitigation, and disaster response and recovery policies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 49.00K | Year: 2011

The objective of this award is to organize and conduct a workshop for NSF-supported Rapid Response Research (RAPID) awardees to identify themes and directions for research programs resulting from their investigations of the 2010 and 2011 New Zealand earthquakes and the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. The two-day workshop will be held at the National Science Foundation in Arlington, Virginia, in 2012. Workshop participants will identify major lessons and opportunities for further research across a range of disciplines, including topics that are cross-disciplinary in nature. Recommendations from the workshop will be shared widely with the broader research and practicing earthquake engineering community in a workshop report disseminated through the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) website (http://www.eeri.org) and EERIs monthly newsletter. This award is part of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), and the workshop report will also be posted on the NEHRP web site (http://www.nehrp.gov).

The New Zealand and Japan earthquakes and tsunami present major learning opportunities for the U.S. research community. The complex nature of these events and resultant disasters provide major lessons and research opportunities across many disciplines. These recent earthquakes and tsunami are among the most significant and relevant events for the U.S. earthquake engineering community in the last several decades. Building codes in both countries are similar to those in the United States for concrete and steel buildings; there are many strong motion records (especially in Japan) that provide valuable data; the geologic setting and tsunami vulnerability for Japan are similar to the Pacific Northwest Cascadian subduction zone; there are similarities and lessons from the transportation, lifelines, and critical facilities sectors; and there are similar social and political issues in the response and recovery. This workshop will provide the mechanism to collect and synthesis observations from the numerous NSF-supported RAPID field studies to identify research needs for earthquake mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery to make the United States better prepared for future disasters.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 240.00K | Year: 2012

Urban centers worldwide are threatened by earthquakes. The effects of an earthquake on a community depend on the magnitude and location of the earthquake as well as on how well the community has planned for the future earthquake. Community resiliency to an earthquake depends on the capacity of individuals, households, businesses, and region to survive and to recover after a disaster strikes. The best lessons for earthquake resiliency can be obtained by the study of what worked and didnt work in regions that are struck by earthquakes. This proposal will design and conduct a focused earthquake reconnaissance effort to accelerate learning about seismic resiliency, such that a significant leap in knowledge can be made. The proposed research effort builds on the acclaimed multi-decade and multi-disciplinary EERI Learning From Earthquakes (LFE) program, but it proposes a major change and refocus of the LFE program to achieve the target result of superior understanding of community resiliency.

A multidisciplinary Seismic Resilience Panel will guide earthquake reconnaissance to maximize resilience learning relevant to the U.S.; to conduct post-earthquake reconnaissance efforts focused on seismic resilience; to develop methods for systematic data collection, archiving, and dissemination of the findings; and to prepare a synthesis report summarizing the principal findings of the project. The intellectual merit of the proposed program lies in (a) defining the key physical and human elements that contribute to, or inhibit, seismic resilience in U.S. communities, and (b) exploring those elements through focused earthquake reconnaissance in the U.S. and worldwide, as appropriate. In the process, better understanding of the physical, social, economic, governance and institutional factors that facilitate or slow recovery will be achieved. By understanding these complex conditions and their interactions in the post-disaster environment, the grand challenges that need to be addressed will emerge. Through the solution of these challenges advancement in resilience knowledge will be gained. The ultimate goal is to improve the seismic resilience of communities in advance of disasters.

Discover hidden collaborations