Houston Ear Research Foundation

Houston, TX, United States

Houston Ear Research Foundation

Houston, TX, United States

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Wolfe J.,Hearts for Hearing | Neumann S.,Hearts for Hearing | Marsh M.,Hearts for Hearing | Schafer E.,University of North Texas | And 7 more authors.
Otology and Neurotology | Year: 2015

Objective Cochlear implant recipients often experience difficulty understanding speech in noise. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential improvement in speech recognition in noise provided by an adaptive, commercially available sound processor that performs acoustic scene classification and automatically adjusts input signal processing to maximize performance in noise. Research Design Within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Setting This multicenter study was conducted across five sites in the U.S.A. and Australia. Patients Ninety-three adults and children with Nucleus Freedom, CI422, and CI512 cochlear implants. Intervention Subjects (previous users of the Nucleus 5 sound processor) were fitted with the Nucleus 6 sound processor. Performance was assessed while these subjects used each sound processor in the manufacturer's recommended default program (standard directionality, ASC + ADRO for the Nucleus 5 processor and ASC + ADRO and SNR-NR with SCAN for the Nucleus 6 sound processor). The subjects were also evaluated with the Nucleus 6 with standard directionality, ASC + ADRO and SNR-NR enabled but SCAN disabled. Main Outcome Measures Speech recognition in noise was assessed with AzBio sentences. Results Sentence recognition in noise was significantly better with the Nucleus 6 sound processor when used with the default input processing (ASC + ADRO, SNR-NR, and SCAN) compared to performance with the Nucleus 5 sound processor and default input processing (standard directionality, ASC + ADRO). Specifically, use of the Nucleus 6 at default settings resulted in a mean improvement in sentence recognition in noise of 27 percentage points relative to performance with the Nucleus 5 sound processor. Use of the Nucleus 6 sound processor using standard directionality, ASC + ADRO and SNR-NR (SCAN disabled) resulted in a mean improvement of 9 percentage points in sentence recognition in noise compared to performance with the Nucleus 5. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the Nucleus 6 sound processor with acoustic scene classification, automatic, adaptive directionality, and speech enhancement in noise processing provides significantly better speech recognition in noise when compared to performance with the Nucleus 5 processor. © 2015, Otology & Neurotology, Inc.


Wolfe J.,Hearts for Hearing | Parkinson A.,Cochlear Americas | Schafer E.C.,University of North Texas | Gilden J.,Houston Ear Research Foundation | And 6 more authors.
Otology and Neurotology | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVE: Previous research shows that cochlear implant users experience significant difficulty with speech perception in noisy listening situations. There is a paucity of research evaluating the potential improvement in speech recognition in noise provided by a dual-microphone directional system in a commercial implant sound processor. The primary objective of this study was to compare speech recognition in quiet and in noise for the Nucleus Freedom and Nucleus 5 CP810 sound processors set to the manufacturer's default user programs for quiet and noisy environments. RESEARCH DESIGN: Crossover with repeated-measures design. SETTING: This multi-center study was conducted across four cochlear implant clinics in the United States. PATIENTS: Thirty-five adults with unilateral Nucleus Freedom cochlear implants. All subjects had used their cochlear implant for at least 6 months and had substantial open-set word recognition as evidenced by a score of at least 40% correct on the Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant (CNC) monosyllabic word recognition test in quiet. INTERVENTION: All subjects (previous users of the Nucleus Freedom sound processor) were fitted with the Nucleus 5 sound processor. Performance was assessed while these subjects used each sound processor in the default user program the manufacturer recommends for quiet and noisy conditions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Speech recognition was assessed with CNC monosyllabic words in quiet and sentences in noise from the BKB-SIN (Bamford-Kowal-Bench Sentences in Noise) test. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and performance with each processor in each listening condition was compared using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: Word recognition in quiet was significantly better with the Nucleus 5 sound processor when compared to performance with the Nucleus Freedom processor. In noise, the Nucleus 5 sound processor also provided a significant improvement in speech recognition relative to the performance with the Nucleus Freedom. CONCLUSION: The results of the study suggest that the Nucleus 5 sound processor provides significantly better speech recognition in quiet and in noise when compared with performance with the Nucleus Freedom processor. © 2012, Otology & Neurotology, Inc.

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