Herriot Hospital

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

Herriot Hospital

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

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Millon A.,University of Lyon | Millon A.,Hospital e Herriot | Boussel L.,Hopital Cardiovasculaire et Pneumologique | Brevet M.,Herriot Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Stroke | Year: 2012

Background and Purpose-Although the ability of MRI to investigate carotid plaque composition is well established, the mechanism and the significance of plaque gadolinium (Gd) enhancement remain unknown. We evaluated clinical and histological significance of Gd enhancement of carotid plaque in patients undergoing endarterectomy for carotid stenosis. Methods-Sixty-nine patients scheduled for a carotid endarterectomy prospectively underwent a 3-T MRI. Carotid plaque enhancement was assessed on T1-weighted images performed before and 5 minutes after Gd injection. Enhancement was recorded according to its localization. Histological analysis was performed of the entire plaque and of the area with matched contrast enhancement on MR images. Results-Gd enhancement was observed in 59% patients. Three types of carotid plaques were identified depending on enhancement location (shoulder region, shoulder and fibrous cap, and central in the plaque). Fibrous cap rupture, intraplaque hemorrhage, and plaque Gd enhancement was significantly more frequent in symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients (P=0.043, P<0.0001, and P=0.034, respectively). After histological analysis, Gd enhancement was significantly associated with vulnerable plaque (American Heart Association VI, P=0.006), neovascularization (P<0.0001), macrophages (P=0.030), and loose fibrosis (P<0.0001). Prevalence of neovessels, macrophages, and loose fibrosis in the area of Gd enhancement was 97%, 87%, and 80%, respectively, and was different depending on the enhancement location in the plaque. Fibrous cap status and composition were different depending on the type of plaque. Conclusions-Gd enhancement of carotid plaque is associated with vulnerable plaque phenotypes and related to an inflammatory process. © 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.


PubMed | Herriot Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of wrist surgery | Year: 2015

BackgroundVolar plating for acute distal radius fractures (DRF) in the elderly has been recommended. Some studies have suggested that open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) in this situation results in frequent complications. Our purposes were to provide a definition of irreparable DRF in independent elderly patients and to review the results of a preliminary retrospective series of wrist hemiarthroplasty (WHA) in this patient population. MaterialsBetween 2011 and 2014, 11 consecutive independent elderly patients (12 wrists) with irreparable intra-articular DRF were treated with primary WHA at the acute stage. A resection of the ulnar head was associated in nine wrists. A total of 11 wrists with more than 2 years of follow-up form the basis of this paper. Description of TechniqueThe approach was dorsal longitudinal. An osteotome longitudinally entered the dorsal aspect of the fracture medial to the Lister tubercle. Two thick osteoperiosteal flaps were elevated radially and ulnarly in a fashion similar to opening a book. The distal radius articular surface was excised. The implant was pressed into the radial canal with attention to restoring distal radius length. The two osteoperiosteal flaps were brought back together and sutured so as to close, again like a book, the osseous and soft tissues around the implant. ResultsAt mean follow-up of 30 months, average visual analog scale (VAS) pain was 1/10. Mean QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score was 32, and mean Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score was 24. Mean forearm rotation arc was 151. Mean active flexion-extension arc was 60. Mean active extension was 34. Mean grip strength was 14kg (64% of contralateral wrist). Mean Lyon wrist score was 73%. Bone healing around the implants was satisfactory in all but one case. ConclusionsOut data suggest that treatment of irreparable DRF in the independent elderly patient with a bone-preserving WHA may be a viable option. Longer-term follow-up and comparative studies are needed to confirm the validity of this concept.

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