Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, FL, United States
Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, FL, United States

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Dzugan S.A.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | Dzugan K.S.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine
Neuroendocrinology Letters | Year: 2015

OBJECTIVE: In 2002 we suggested a new hypothesis of migraine. This hypothesis implies that migraine is a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity. The goal of this clinical analysis is to present the evaluation of the effect of a multimodal treatment program in migraine management. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated 30 patients ages 16-66 with migraine who were treated with a multimodal treatment program. All patients'received a complex program which included: hormonorestorative therapy (HT) with bioidentical hormones; correction of balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic systems and simultaneously calcium/magnesium balance; "resetting" the pineal gland; improvement of intestinal absorption through restoration of normal intestinal flora, and a cleanse from parasitic infestation (if necessary). Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), progesterone, total estrogen, and total testosterone were determined, RESULTS: All patients responded to this regimen. We do not have patients who still have migraine after they started to use this program. Laboratory finding prior to HT showed the significant deficiency in production of all basic steroid hormones (progesterone and pregnenolone production declined the most). Concurrent symptoms such as fibromyalgia, insomnia, depression, gastrointestinal disorders, and fatigue had disappeared. Total cholesterol completely normalized in 22 (91.7%) patients. No adverse effects or complications related to this program were registered. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the hypothesis that migraine is a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity, and that migraine can be managed by a multimodal approach.


Dzugan S.A.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine
Anti-Aging Therapeutics - 2011 Conference Year | Year: 2012

Stem cell therapy and hormonorestorative therapy (HT) work on a very basic and foundational level. Current stem cell therapy has some issues with the optimization of stem cell function. Proliferation and maturation of stem cells can be affected by environmental factors, but the main physiologic control of the rate of blood cell formation is exerted at the level of blast transformation, which is mediated by specific factors or hormones. Different studies have shown that specific nutrients and hormones can encourage the growth or proliferation of stem cells in one's body, thus promoting regeneration and healing. A powerful method to support stem cell proliferation and function is through the optimization of hormone levels. Using bioidentical hormones, it is possible to restore deficient adult hormones to youthful levels. HT can significantly increase metabolism and anabolic processes that can help with the effect of stem cells and most importantly, HT can control the immune system and keep it strong, which will prevent possible gross abnormalities from transplanted stem cells. Targeted nutritional and hormonal therapies may help promote wellness and fight the diseases associated with aging through the optimization of stem cell production and function. Also, there is a possible significant positive effect of stem cell therapy as part of regeneration therapy on hormonal production in patients with steroid insufficiency.


Dzugan S.A.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | Rozakis G.W.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | Dzugan K.S.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | Emhof L.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | And 7 more authors.
Anti-Aging Therapeutics - 2011 Conference Year | Year: 2012

In 2002 we proposed a new hypothesis of the etiology and pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia. There is paucity of information in the literature regarding the association of steroidopenia and hypercholesterolemia. The goal of this clinical analysis was to evaluate the role of hormonorestorative therapy (HT) as a part of physiology optimization in hypercholesterolemia treatment. We retrospectively analyzed the results of two studies that included 155 patients with hypercholesterolemia. Also, we presented the results of our own clinical analysis of 246 patients on the relationship between cortisol and age. Laboratory workup included lipid profile, serum pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), progesterone, total estrogen, cortisol, total testosterone, and vitamin D-3 levels at presentation with follow-up ranging from 3 to 9 months. HT included a combination of several agents such as pregnenolone, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), triestrogen, testosterone, hydrocortisone, and vitamin D-3. All patients responded to therapy. HT lowered mean serum total cholesterol (TC) from 252.9 mg/dL before to 190.7 mg/dL after treatment (dropped 24.6%) in the first study and from 229 mg/dL to 184 mg/dL (19.7%) in the second. These decreased values were associated with statistically significant elevations in pregnenolone, DHEA-S, testosterone, and progesterone, but not total estrogen, cortisol, or vitamin D-3 changes in both men and women. Our cortisol study showed that the average fasting morning cortisol levels did not increase with age. In fact, average cortisol levels remained rather stable regardless of the patient's age. We concluded that correction of steroidopenia with the use of HT is an effective strategy for normalizing and maintaining cholesterol homeostasis.


Dzugan S.A.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | Rozakis G.W.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | Dzugan K.S.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | Emhof L.,Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine | And 5 more authors.
Neuroendocrinology Letters | Year: 2011

OBJECTIVE: In 2002 we proposed a new hypothesis of the etiology and pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia. There is paucity of information in the literature regarding the association of steroidopenia and hypercholesterolemia. Our goal is to determine if the treatment of steroidopenia with hormonorestorative therapy (HT) to youthful levels will normalize total cholesterol (TC) levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 43 hypercholesterolemic patients treated with HT. Laboratory workup included lipid profile, serum pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), progesterone, total estrogen, Cortisol, total testosterone, and vitamin D-3 levels at presentation with follow up ranging from 3 to 9 months. HT therapy included a combination of several agents such as pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), triestrogen, progesterone, testosterone, hydrocortisone, and vitamin D-3. RESULTS: HT lowered mean TC from 228.8mg/dL to 183.7mg/dL (19.7%) (p<0.05) in all patients. In 12 men of mean age 58, HT statistically significantly lowered TC from 227.9 mg/dL to 177.1 mg/dL (22.3%) (p<0.05). Apparently it did so mostly by lowering LDL and triglycerides (TRG) while HDL did not appreciably change. In 31 women, mean age 57, TC declined from 229.2 mg/dL to 186.3 mg/dL (19%) (p<0.05). HDL, LDL, and TRG are also decreased to a statistically significant degree. These results were associated with statistically significant elevations in pregnenolone, DHEA Sulfate, testosterone, progesterone but not total estrogen, Cortisol or vitamin D-3 changes in both men and women. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that correction of steroidopenia with the use of hormonorestorative therapy is an effective strategy for normalizing and maintaining cholesterol homeostasis. ©2011 Neuroendocrinology Letters.


PubMed | Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neuro endocrinology letters | Year: 2011

In 2002 we proposed a new hypothesis of the etiology and pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia. There is paucity of information in the literature regarding the association of steroidopenia and hypercholesterolemia. Our goal is to determine if the treatment of steroidopenia with hormonorestorative therapy (HT) to youthful levels will normalize total cholesterol (TC) levels.We retrospectively analyzed 43 hypercholesterolemic patients treated with HT. Laboratory workup included lipid profile, serum pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), progesterone, total estrogen, cortisol, total testosterone, and vitamin D-3 levels at presentation with follow up ranging from 3 to 9 months. HT therapy included a combination of several agents such as pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), triestrogen, progesterone, testosterone, hydrocortisone, and vitamin D-3.HT lowered mean TC from 228.8mg/dL to 183.7mg/dL (19.7%) (p<0.05) in all patients. In 12 men of mean age 58, HT statistically significantly lowered TC from 227.9mg/dL to 177.1mg/dL (22.3%) (p<0.05). Apparently it did so mostly by lowering LDL and triglycerides (TRG) while HDL did not appreciably change. In 31women, mean age 57, TC declined from 229.2mg/dL to 186.3mg/dL (19%) (p<0.05). HDL, LDL, and TRG are also decreased to a statistically significant degree. These results were associated with statistically significant elevations in pregnenolone, DHEA Sulfate, testosterone, progesterone but not total estrogen, cortisol or vitamin D-3 changes in both men and women.We conclude that correction of steroidopenia with the use of hormonorestorative therapy is an effective strategy for normalizing and maintaining cholesterol homeostasis.


PubMed | Hattiesburg Clinic and Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neuro endocrinology letters | Year: 2016

Osteoporosis related fractures pose a significant economic and healthcare problem. There is a growing concern about increased numbers of stress or low energy fractures after bisphosphonates therapy. A 65-year-old woman is presented with a stress fracture of the left femur. From our point of view, this fracture was associated with a long-term statin and bisphosphonate therapy. We did not find a similar presentation in medical literature.


PubMed | Dzugan Institute of Restorative Medicine
Type: Clinical Study | Journal: Neuro endocrinology letters | Year: 2016

In 2002 we suggested a new hypothesis of migraine. This hypothesis implies that migraine is a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity. The goal of this clinical analysis is to present the evaluation of the effect of a multimodal treatment program in migraine management.We evaluated 30 patients ages 16-66 with migraine who were treated with a multimodal treatment program. All patients received a complex program which included: hormonorestorative therapy (HT) with bio-identical hormones; correction of balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic systems and simultaneously calcium/magnesium balance; resetting the pineal gland; improvement of intestinal absorption through restoration of normal intestinal flora, and a cleanse from parasitic infestation (if necessary). Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), progesterone, total estrogen, and total testosterone were determined,All patients responded to this regimen. We do not have patients who still have migraine after they started to use this program. Laboratory finding prior to HT showed the significant deficiency in production of all basic steroid hormones (progesterone and pregnenolone production declined the most). Concurrent symptoms such as fibromyalgia, insomnia, depression, gastrointestinal disorders, and fatigue had disappeared. Total cholesterol completely normalized in 22 (91.7%) patients. No adverse effects or complications related to this program were registered.Our findings support the hypothesis that migraine is a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity, and that migraine can be managed by a multimodal approach.

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