Dynalene Inc.

Whitehall Township, PA, United States

Dynalene Inc.

Whitehall Township, PA, United States
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The global glycols market value is anticipated to exceed USD 47.2 billion by 2025 The rising HVAC demand for advanced and high quality heating and cooling systems is expected to be a key factor steering the growth in the coming years. Glycols include ethylene, propylene and its derivatives are predominately used in the automotive sector as engine antifreeze and coolant products with lower freezing points. The growing product demand in key end-use industries including food & beverage, textiles, medical, and aerospace are expected to increase the consumption globally.Heavy industrialization in countries such as Japan, China, and India have contributed significantly to the glycols demand over the recent past. Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) sector dominated the global consumption with demand exceeding 4,100 kilo tons in 2015. Textiles accounted for over 12% of global revenue in 2015. Stringent chemical disposal regulations in the North American and European region have contributed to this demand in the recent past and are expected to continue the trend over the forecast period. Growing R&D initiatives by key participants coupled with technological advancements to discover novel diol products with higher efficiency level and durability are expected to create new opportunities for the industrial applications. Further key findings from the report suggest: Key Topics Covered: 1. Methodology and Scope 2. Executive Summary 3. Glycols Industry Outlook 3.1. Market segmentation 3.2. Market size and growth prospects, 2014 - 2025 3.3. Value chain analysis 3.4. End-Use Trends 3.5. Ethylene glycol recycling industry: Current trends and future prospects 3.6. Regulatory framework 3.7. Technology Landscape 3.8. Price Trends analysis by key regional market 3.9. Market dynamics 5. Glycols Market: Application Outlook 5.1. Glycols market share by application, 2015 & 2025 5.2. Glycols demand by application, 2015 & 2025 (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.1. Automotive (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.2. HVAC (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.3. Textiles (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.4. Airline (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.5. Medical (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.6. Pipeline Maintenance (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.7. Polyester Fibers & resin (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.8. Food & Beverage Processing (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 5.2.9. Others (Kilo Tons) (USD Million) 8. Company Profiles - SABIC - Dow Chemical Company - Sinopec, Corp. - Royal Dutch Shell plc. - Reliance Industries Ltd. - Huntsman International LLC - BASF - Kuwait Petroleum Corporation - AkzoNobel N.V. - Clariant AG - Strategic initiative - Formosa Plastics Corporation - Strategic initiative - INEOS - Strategic initiative - Ultrapar Participacoes S.A. (Ultrapar) - LOTTE CHEMICAL CORPORATION - Strategic initiative - Archer Daniels Midland Company - Dupont Tate & Lyle Bio Products LLC - Temix International S.R.L. - Ashland, Inc. - Cargill Inc. - Strategic initiative - LyondellBasell Industries - Univar - MEGlobal - Safety-Kleen Systems, Inc. - Miles Chemical Company - Penta Manufacturing Company - H.B. Fuller - Vetoquinol USA - Indorama Ventures Public Company Limited - Force Chem Technologies - ORG Chem Group LLC - Sequoia Global, Inc. - Inland Technologies - Vinmar International - End-Use Landscape - Radco Industries, Inc. - Houghton Chemical Corporation - Pacific Fluids, LLC - Silver Fern Chemical, Inc. - Recochem, Inc. - Dynalene, Inc. - Thermal Fluids, Inc - Castrol - EET Corporation - Kost USA, Inc. - Ford Motor Company - Prestone Products Corporation - ExxonMobil - Amsoil, Inc. - Lytron, Inc. - Warren Oil Company, Inc. - DAK Americas LLC - Coolants Plus, Inc. - 10. Glycol Recyclers- Landscape - Clear Choice Antifreeze - Antifreeze Recycling, Inc. - Veolia North America, LLC - Jebro, Inc. - Solvents & Petroleum Service, Inc. - MidStates Oil Refining Co., LLC. - First Brands Corporation - Spirit Services, Inc. - Service benchmarking - Clean Green Environmental Services - Products benchmarking - Recyctec Holding AB For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/d7fl64/glycols_market Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-glycols-market-analysis-by-product-by-application-by-region-and-segment-forecasts-2014---2025---research-and-markets-300453307.html


Coscia K.,Dynalene Inc. | Elliott T.,Lehigh University | Mohapatra S.,Dynalene Inc. | Oztekin A.,Dynalene Inc. | Neti S.,Dynalene Inc.
Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, Transactions of the ASME | Year: 2013

Current heat transfer fluids for concentrated solar power applications are limited by their high temperature stability. Other fluids that are capable of operating at high temperatures have very high melting points. The present work is aimed at characterizing potential solar heat transfer fluid candidates that are likely to be thermally stable (up to 500 °C) with a lower melting point (∼100 °C). Binary and ternary mixtures of nitrates have the potential for being such heat transfer fluids. To characterize such eutectic media, both experimental measurements and analytical methods resulting in phase diagrams and other properties of the fluids are essential. Solidus and liquidus data have been determined using a differential scanning calorimeter over the range the compositions for each salt system and mathematical models have been derived using Gibbs Energy minimization. The Gibbs models presented in this paper sufficiently fit the experimental results as well as providing accurate predictions of the eutectic compositions and temperatures for each system. The methods developed here are expected to have broader implications in the identification of optimizing new heat transfer fluids for a wide range of applications, including solar thermal power systems. © 2013 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.


Yang Y.,Lehigh University | Oztekin A.,Lehigh University | Neti S.,Lehigh University | Mohapatra S.,Dynalene Inc.
Journal of Nanoparticle Research | Year: 2012

The present study demonstrates the importance of actual agglomerated particle size in the nanofluid and its effect on the fluid properties. The current work deals with 5 to 100 nm nanoparticles dispersed in fluids that resulted in 200 to 800 nm agglomerates. Particle size distributions for a range of nanofluids are measured by dynamic light scattering(DLS). Wet scanning electron microscopy method is used to visualize agglomerated particles in thedispersed state and to confirm particle size measurements by DLS. Our results show that a combination of base fluid chemistry and nanoparticle type is very important to create stable nanofluids. Several nanofluids resulted in stable state without any stabilizers, but n the long term had agglomerations of 250 % over a 2 month period. The effects of agglomeration on the thermal and rheological properties are presented forseveral types of nanoparticle and base fluid chemistries. Despite using nanodiamond particles with highthermal conductivity and a very sensitive laser flash thermal conductivity measurement technique, no anomalous increases of thermal conductivity was measured. The thermal conductivity increases of nanofluid with the particle concentration are as those predicted by Maxwell and Bruggeman models. The level of agglomeration of nanoparticles hardly influenced the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid. Theviscosity of nanofluids increased strongly as the concentration of particle is increased; it displays shear thinning and is a strong function of the level of agglomeration. The viscosity increase is significantly above of that predicted by the Einstein model even forvery small concentration of nanoparticles. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Garsany Y.,Excet Inc. | Garsany Y.,U.S. Navy | Dutta S.,Dynalene Inc. | Swider-Lyons K.E.,U.S. Navy
Journal of Power Sources | Year: 2012

We use cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry to study glycol-based coolant formulations to show that individual constituents have either negligible or significant poisoning effects on the nanoscale Pt/carbon catalysts used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The base fluid in all these coolants is glycol (1, 3 propanediol), commercially available in a BioGlycol coolant formulation with an ethoxylated nonylphenol surfactant, and azole- and polyol-based non-ionic corrosion inhibitors. Exposure of a Pt/Vulcan carbon electrode to glycol-water or glycol-water-surfactant mixtures causes the loss of Pt electrochemical surface area (ECSA), but the Pt ECSA is fully recovered in clean electrolyte. Only mixtures with the azole corrosion inhibitor cause irreversible losses to the Pt ECSA and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. The Pt ECSA and ORR activity can only be recovered to within 70% of its initial values after aggressive voltammetric cycling to 1.50 V after azole poisoning. When poisoned with a glycol mixture containing the polyol corrosion inhibitor instead, the Pt ECSA and ORR activity is completely recovered by exposure to a clean electrolyte. The results suggest that prior to incorporation in a fuel cell, voltammetric evaluation of the constituents of coolant formulations is worthwhile. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Krishna K.H.,Lehigh University | Neti S.,Lehigh University | Oztekin A.,Lehigh University | Mohapatra S.,Dynalene Inc.
Journal of Applied Physics | Year: 2015

Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed. © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is through the development of cost effective, high temperature molten salt heat transfer fluids for concentrated solar power plants that would make solar power an economical and viable source of renewable energy for mass consumption. With the worldwide growing need for energy, alternative sources of energy have been the primary focus of research over the past few decades. Molten salt heat transfer fluid used in concentrated solar power plants are one sub-area of such research. Molten salts have excellent stability at high temperature (>650C) and can be mined and easily manufactured into solar heat transfer fluids at a reasonable cost. Additionally, the developed molten salt heat transfer fluid would increase the efficiency of energy generation in solar power plants and provide potential cost savings by utilizing ubiquitous economical metals such as stainless steel. The heat transfer fluid could potentially bring the subsidy-free installed system price at the utility scale to a competitive price of 5-6 cents per kilowatt-hour. The technical objectives in this Phase I research project are to (i) develop a fundamental understanding of interfacial corrosion of 316L stainless steel in molten chloride salt compositions and (ii) inhibit this corrosion by utilizing suitable additives. It is known that chloride salts could potentially increase the operating temperatures (to 900 Celcius) and hence enhance the energy efficiency of solar power plants. However, the extreme corrosive behavior of molten chlorides towards the stainless steel pipes utilized in solar plants has prevented their usage for practical applications. With the fundamental corrosion insight gained through this research project, Dynalene intends to develop proprietary inhibitor compositions that can be added to the chloride salt in-situ during the operation of a solar power plant. These additives would minimize corrosion by forming a continuous and inert ceramic layer at the operating temperature on the stainless steel surface, and simultaneo usly strengthen the grain boundaries. Dynalene had some initial success in growing a few micron-thick inert, continuous ceramic layer on a stainless steel surface. In this project, Dynalene will develop a corrosion package that would reduce dechromatization in steel and restrict the corrosion rate of 316L stainless steel to 10 micro-meters/year


Dutta S.,Dynalene Inc. | Mohapatra S.,Dynalene Inc. | Coscia K.,Dynalene Inc.
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series | Year: 2013

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) provides an efficient way of converting solar energy to electricity and heat. Using expensive high alloy materials for piping in the solar field requires an immense capital cost, so it is beneficial to use less-expensive materials while still being able to circulate the fluid at high temperatures with minimal corrosion. Compared to the other melts, molten chloride salts provide operating temperatures higher than 600 °C which causes extensive corrosion of stainless steel. SEM, EDS and XRD studies showed that rare earth oxide (La2O3) was incorporated to the melt lead to the formation of La rich crystals on the lamellar oxide layer at temperatures above 600 °C after 100h heat treatment. The alkaline rare earth addition increased the basicity of the salt which reduced the corrosion attack and leaching of the Cr from the stainless steel UNS S31603. Addition of alkaline oxide (MgO) led to the formation of passivating Mg rich ferrite layer but La based perovskite was not achieved which is possibly due to the fact that the reaction kinetics of the Mg based layer was much faster than the La based perovskite crystals. © 2013 by NACE International.


Trademark
Dynalene Inc. | Date: 2014-09-05

Cleaning agents and preparations.


Trademark
Dynalene Inc. | Date: 2010-06-22

Coolant fluids used as a heat transfer media in Geothermal applications.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: STTR PHASE I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is through the development of cost effective, high temperature molten salt heat transfer fluids for concentrated solar power plants that would make solar power an economical and viable source of renewable energy for mass consumption. With the worldwide growing need for energy, alternative sources of energy have been the primary focus of research over the past few decades. Molten salt heat transfer fluid used in concentrated solar power plants are one sub-area of such research. Molten salts have excellent stability at high temperature (>650C) and can be mined and easily manufactured into solar heat transfer fluids at a reasonable cost. Additionally, the developed molten salt heat transfer fluid would increase the efficiency of energy generation in solar power plants and provide potential cost savings by utilizing ubiquitous economical metals such as stainless steel. The heat transfer fluid could potentially bring the subsidy-free installed system price at the utility scale to a competitive price of 5-6 cents per kilowatt-hour.

The technical objectives in this Phase I research project are to (i) develop a fundamental understanding of interfacial corrosion of 316L stainless steel in molten chloride salt compositions and (ii) inhibit this corrosion by utilizing suitable additives. It is known that chloride salts could potentially increase the operating temperatures (to 900 Celcius) and hence enhance the energy efficiency of solar power plants. However, the extreme corrosive behavior of molten chlorides towards the stainless steel pipes utilized in solar plants has prevented their usage for practical applications. With the fundamental corrosion insight gained through this research project, Dynalene intends to develop proprietary inhibitor compositions that can be added to the chloride salt in-situ during the operation of a solar power plant. These additives would minimize corrosion by forming a continuous and inert ceramic layer at the operating temperature on the stainless steel surface, and simultaneo usly strengthen the grain boundaries. Dynalene had some initial success in growing a few micron-thick inert, continuous ceramic layer on a stainless steel surface. In this project, Dynalene will develop a corrosion package that would reduce dechromatization in steel and restrict the corrosion rate of 316L stainless steel to 10 micro-meters/year

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